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Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj
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  • White evangelical 3-way:56% path to citizenship11% permanent legal residents30% identity and deport3% DK/Ref
  • Both WEP and WC are 8 points above GP on economic threat
  • A strong majority (59%) of Americans believe that immigrants today see themselves as part of the American community, much like immigrants from previous eras, while 36% disagree. WEP 58% say threaten traditional American valuesWC similar to GP
  • A strong majority (59%) of Americans believe that immigrants today see themselves as part of the American community, much like immigrants from previous eras, while 36% disagree.
  • White evangelical 3-way:56% path to citizenship11% permanent legal residents30% identity and deport3% DK/RefNote that only 9% of white evangelicals in the seldom/never category.
  • Even fewer Americans favor a policy colloquially known as “self-deportation,” in which conditions are made so difficult for illegal immigrants that they return to their home country on their own. More than one-third (34%) of Americans agree that this is the best way to solve the country’s illegal immigration problem, while nearly two-thirds (64%) disagree. The largest difference between Democrats and Republicans, for example, is 13 percentage points. Republicans rank the pragmatic-legal values of promoting national security, enforcing the rule of law, and ensuring fairness to taxpayers consistently higher than Democrats by double-digit margins. The largest (13 points) pragmatic-legal values gaps occur on the values of promoting national security (Republicans 94%, Democrats 81%) and enforcing the rule of law (Republicans 86%, Democrats 73%)Democrats, by contrast, rate many of the cultural-religious values higher (12-13 points) than Republicans. The largest cultural-religious values gaps occur on the values of following the Golden Rule (Democrats 75%, Republicans 62%) and continuing America’s heritage as a nation of immigrants (Democrats 59%, Republicans 47%).
  • WEP on welcoming the stranger: 25% extremely important, 40% very important.WC on welcoming the stranger: 13% extremely important, 27% very important.
  • White evangelical 3-way:56% path to citizenship11% permanent legal residents30% identity and deport3% DK/Ref
  • Other controls included:*male*low income (<$30k)*high income ($100k+)*unemployed (significant at p<0.1)*attend seldom or neverOther controls tried and dropped:*region*urban/rural
  • Social contact drops out hereUnemployed drops out here.Attendance drops out
  • The following are significant at p<0.1:Low income
  • At p<0.1, the following are significant:MaleTea Party
  • Transcript

    • 1. Public Religion Research Institute Dr. Robert P. Jones, CEO Daniel Cox, Director of Research Juhem Navarro-Rivera, Research Associate THREATS AND VALUES: FACTORS INFLUENCING SUPPORT FOR A PATH TO CITIZENSHIP How Economic Threat, Cultural Threat, Social Contact, and Religiosity Influence Support for a Path to Citizenship
    • 2. Context: Immigration Debate in the United States • Major issue in 2012 campaign. • Two racial/ethnic groups with large numbers of immigrants overwhelmingly supported Barack Obama over Mitt Romney. • Hispanic American vote: 71% Obama; 27% Romney • Asian American vote: 73% Obama; 26% Romney • Major policy issue of 2013. Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill introduced by a bipartisan group of senators: • Includes a path to citizenship for immigrants living in the country illegally; • Pending debated in the U.S. House of Representatives. • Strong involvement of two religious groups: Catholics and white evangelical Protestants. • Religious messaging heavily focused on “welcoming the stranger.” • Data in this presentation comes from the PRRI/Brookings’ Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465). PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 2
    • 3. Dependent Variable: Support for Path to Citizenship 63 14 21 2 Which statement comes closest to your view about how the immigration system should deal with immigrants who are currently living in the U.S. illegally? Allow them a way to become citizens provided they meet certain requirements Allow them to become permanent legal residents, but not citizens Identify and deport them None of these/Don't know/Refused PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 3
    • 4. Support for Path to Citizenship White Evangelicals and White Catholics PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 4 74 71 70 67 64 63 62 61 56 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Hispanic Catholic Hispanic Protestant Black Protestant Jewish Unaffiliated Mormon White Catholic White Mainline White Evangelical Support for Path to Citizenship By Religious Affiliation
    • 5. FACTORS INFLUENCING SUPPORT FOR PATH TO CITIZENSHIP 1. Economic Threat 2. Cultural Threat 3. Social Contact 4. Religious Attendance 5. Welcoming the Stranger PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 5
    • 6. Hypotheses PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 6 Hypothesis Relationship to Support for Path to Citizenship 1. Economic Threat Thinking that immigrants are taking jobs away from American citizens Negative 2. Culture Threat Thinking that newcomers from other countries threaten American values Negative 3. Social Contact Having a friend or family member born outside the U.S. Positive 4. Religious Attendance Attending religious services weekly or more Positive 5. Religious Values Believing that biblical message of “welcoming the stranger” is an extremely important value Positive
    • 7. Economic Threat: Immigrants take jobs away from American citizens PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 7 64 27 4 5 Immigrants coming to this country today mostly... Take jobs Americans don't want Take jobs away from American citizens Both Don't know/Refused
    • 8. Support for Path to Citizenship by Perception of Economic Threat PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 8 34 32 34 68 61 70 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Immigrants coming to the country today mostly… Take jobs away from Americans Take unwanted jobs
    • 9. Cultural Threat: Newcomers from Other Countries Threaten American Values PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 9 40 54 3 3 Growing Number of Newcomers from Other Countries… Threatens traditional American customs and values Strenghten American society Neither/Both equally Don't know/Refused
    • 10. Support for Path to Citizenship by Perception of Cultural Threat PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 10 50 47 52 73 68 73 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Growing number of newcomers to the country... Threatens American Values Strenghtens American society
    • 11. Social Contact: Foreign-Born Close Friends or Relatives PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 11 61 39 Do you have any close friends or relatives who were born outside the U.S.? Yes No
    • 12. Support for Path to Citizenship by Social Contact PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 12 59 53 61 66 59 67 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Do you have any close friends or relatives who were born outside the U.S.? No Yes
    • 13. Support for Path to Citizenship By Religious Attendance PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 13 63 41 65 62 58 6564 58 66 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Support for Path to Citizenship By Religious Attendance Seldom or never A few times a month/year Weekly or more
    • 14. Welcoming the Stranger, Values as Important Guides to Immigration Reform PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 14 50 52 69 77 77 82 84 84 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Following the biblical example of welcoming the stranger Continuing America's heritage as a nation of immigrants Following the Golden Rule, providing immigrants the same opportunities I would want if my family was immigrating to the… Enforcing the rule of law Enuring fairness to taxpayers Protecting the dignity of every person Keeping families together Promoting national security Source: PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) Values as Moral Guides to Immigration Reform Extremely important Very important
    • 15. Welcoming the Stranger PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 15 17 25 13 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Following the biblical example of welcoming the stranger as guide to immigration policy Percent saying Extremely Important
    • 16. Support for Path to Citizenship By Importance of “welcoming the stranger” PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 16 64 55 66 59 66 58 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 All Americans White Evangelicals White Catholics Importance of biblical value of "welcoming the stranger" as guide to immigration policy Less Important Extremely Important
    • 17. INFLUENCES ON SUPPORT FOR A PATH TO CITIZENSHIP PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 17
    • 18. Model #1: General Population with Religious Attendance PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 18 Among General Population Variable Coefficient Significance Odds Ratio Hispanic 0.379 0.000 1.462 Tea Party -0.585 0.000 0.557 Democrat 0.296 0.000 1.345 Republican -0.366 0.000 0.693 College education 0.265 0.001 1.303 Millennial (18-33) 0.244 0.003 1.277 Senior (65+) 0.203 0.024 1.225 Attend weekly or more 0.161 0.037 1.174
    • 19. Model #5: GP with Economic Threat, Cultural Threat, and Social Contact PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 19 Among General Population Variable Coefficient Significance Odds Ratio Hispanic 0.397 0.007 1.487 Tea Party -0.510 0.003 0.601 Democrat 0.298 0.007 1.348 Republican -0.278 0.024 0.757 Millennial (18-33) 0.265 0.026 1.303 Senior (65+) 0.362 0.006 1.436 Newcomers are a threat -0.875 0.000 0.417 Immigrants take U.S. jobs -0.936 0.000 0.392
    • 20. Model #7: White Evangelicals with Economic Threat, Cultural Threat, Social Contact, Attendance, Welcoming Stranger PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 20 Among White Evangelicals Variable Coefficient Significance Odds Ratio Millennial (18-33) .886 .014 2.425 Attend seldom or never -1.178 .009 .308 Newcomers are a threat -1.355 .000 .258 Immigrants take U.S. jobs -.894 .000 .409 Welcoming the stranger 1.091 .000 2.978
    • 21. Model #9: White Catholics with Economic Threat, Cultural Threat, Social Contact, & Welcoming the Stranger PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 21 Among White Catholics Variable Coefficient Significance Odds Ratio Senior (65+) .617 .049 1.853 Newcomers are a threat -1.148 .000 .317 Immigrants take U.S. jobs -1.209 .000 .317
    • 22. Conclusion I: Economic Threat, Cultural Threat, Social Contact • Hypotheses that economic threat and cultural threat are negatively associated with support for a path to citizenship were confirmed. • Among the general population and among white Catholics, perceptions of economic threat have slightly stronger negative associations with a path to citizenship than perceptions of cultural threat do. • However, among white evangelical Protestants, perceptions of economic threat hold weaker negative associations with a path to citizenship, compared to perceptions of cultural threat. • Our expectations that close social contact with immigrants would have a positive association with support for a path to citizenship was not confirmed. PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 22
    • 23. Conclusion II: Religious Attendance and Religious Values • Our expectation that higher levels of religious attendance would be associated with positive support for a path to citizenship was conditionally confirmed. • Among white evangelical Protestants, when controlling for economic and cultural threat (Model 7) attending religious services infrequently (seldom or never) was negatively associated with support for a path to citizenship. • Finally, our expectation that thinking that the biblical concept of “welcoming the stranger” is an extremely important moral guide to immigration reform would be positively associated with support for a path to citizenship was not confirmed among either the general population or among white Catholics, but it was confirmed among white evangelical Protestants. PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 23
    • 24. Survey Methodology 2013 Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey • Designed and conducted by Public Religion Research Institute in partnership with The Brookings Institution • One of largest surveys ever conducted on immigration (N=4,465 Americans) • MOE = +/- 1.7 percentage points at the 95% confidence interval for total sample • Conducted by telephone (1,774 contacted by cell phone) between January 28 and February 24, 2013 • Bilingual (English and Spanish) interviews • Funded by The Ford Foundation, with additional support from The Nathan Cummings Foundation and Four Freedoms Fund/Public Interest Projects PRRI/Brookings, Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey, March 2013 (N=4,465) 24

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