Humanities I: Year's End

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Humanities I: Year's End

  1. 1.
  2. 2. Birthdate: 11 July 1967<br />Birthplace: London, England<br />Hometown: Kingston, Rhode Island<br /><ul><li> a daughter of Bengali Indian immigrants</li></ul>father: worked as a librarian at the <br /> University of Rhode Island<br /> mother: taught her their Bengali heritage<br />- had moved from England to the U.S.A.<br />- had considered herself an American<br />
  3. 3. Educational Attainment<br />South Kingstown High School<br />Barnard College <br /> - B.A. English Literature<br />Boston University<br />- M.A. English<br />- M.A. Comparative Literature<br />- M.A. Creative Writing<br />- Ph.D. Renaissance Studies<br />
  4. 4. Works<br />addresses sensitive dilemmas in the live of Bengali Indian immigrants, disconnection between the first and second generation of US immigrants<br />"When I first started writing I was not conscious that my subject was the Indian-American experience. What drew me to my craft was the desire to force the two worlds I occupied to mingle on the page as I was not brave enough, or mature enough, to allow in life."<br />
  5. 5. Some Notable Works<br />Interpreter of Maladies (1999)<br />a collection of stories of Indian-American experiences (Pulitzer Prize for fiction and PEN award)<br />The Namesake (2003)<br />a novel, which later had a film adaptation, about generational gap (first and second generation immigrants)<br />Unaccustomed Earth (2008)<br />a collection of short stories (Pulitzer Prize) (includes second and third generations)<br />
  6. 6. Some Notable Works<br />Interpreter of Maladies (1999)<br />a collection of stories of Indian-American experiences (Pulitzer Prize for fiction and PEN award)<br />The Namesake (2003)<br />a novel, which later had a film adaptation, about generational gap (first and second generation immigrants)<br />Unaccustomed Earth (2008)<br />a collection of short stories (Pulitzer Prize) (includes second and third generations)<br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Kaushik<br />- narrator<br />- 21 years old<br />- born in 1965 at Cambridge, Massachusetts<br />- 9 years old: went to Bombay, India<br /><ul><li> 16 years old: went back to Cambridge, Massachusetts</li></ul> after his mother got sick<br />- 18 years old: his mother died<br />- studied at Swarthmore; lived in a dorm<br />
  9. 9. Kaushik’s Father<br />- 55 years old<br />- had his first job at Cambridge, Massachusetts<br />- first married in 1962 (arranged marriage)<br /><ul><li> after wife got sick, he would arrive home with flowers, </li></ul> and would go to work late<br /><ul><li> wrote Bengali poems and read them to his wife </li></ul> but stopped when she died<br /><ul><li> married Chitra, whom he met for just a few weeks </li></ul> and had only seen twice before their marriage<br /><ul><li> reason for remarrying: he was tired of coming home to </li></ul> an empty house<br />
  10. 10. Kaushik’s Mother<br /><ul><li> married in 1962 (arranged marriage) and </li></ul> moved to Massachusetts<br /><ul><li> would occasionally return to Calcutta to cheer up </li></ul> her parents<br /><ul><li> was fond of the ocean and swimming and </li></ul> modern architecture<br />- died at the age of 42 because of cancer<br />- her ashes were tossed from a boat off the Gloucester coast<br /><ul><li> her jewelries were distributed to the poor women in </li></ul> Calcutta who had worked for their extended family <br /> as ayahs or cooks or maids<br />
  11. 11. Chitra<br />- 35 years old (20 years younger than her 2nd husband)<br />- lost her spouse to encephalitis two years before <br />­ a schoolteacher<br />- traditional<br />- had two daughters: Rupa and Piu<br />- didn’t speak English well<br />- asked Kaushik to call her Mamoni<br />
  12. 12. Chitra’s Daughters<br />Rupa<br /><ul><li> 10 years old</li></ul>Piu<br />- 7 years old<br />
  13. 13. Kaushik’s Maternal Grandparents<br /><ul><li> didn’t believe when their grandchild, Kaushik, and </li></ul> his father told them that their daughter died<br /><ul><li> they were still hoping that their daughter would come</li></ul> back, boarding a plane once again<br />
  14. 14. Jessica<br /><ul><li>Kaushik’s girlfriend whom he met at Spanish class</li></ul>Mrs. Gharibian<br /><ul><li> middle-aged woman with short brown hair and </li></ul> a soft Southern accent<br /><ul><li>Kaushik’s mother’s nurse</li></ul>Zarin<br />- family cook at Bombay<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16. Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.<br />This was where the family of Kaushik moved after his mother got sick. Before moving, they had been living in Bombay, India.<br /><ul><li> Their house was a stark structure of concrete and glass that Kaushik’s mother preferred more than the shingled, shuttered homes typical of the towns
  17. 17. Modernist architecture, proximal to the ocean, somewhat isolated, enormous, “more befitting of an institution than a private home”
  18. 18. Where the new wife of Kaushik’s father and her children moved</li></li></ul><li>Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.<br />It was set during the Christmas Season<br /><ul><li> Probably in the 1980’s since Kaushik’s parents married in 1962 and Kaushik is 21 in the story.
  19. 19. Jimi Hendrix, Paul Strand – icons who were famous during Kaushik’s adolescent year; cassettes were famous in the 1980’s; Family Feud; Dunkin’ Donuts
  20. 20. Winter</li></li></ul><li>
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23. Introduction<br />Point of Attack<br />Complication<br />Climax<br />Resolution<br />
  24. 24.
  25. 25. Characters<br />Environment<br />
  26. 26. Kaushik<br />Father<br />
  27. 27. Kaushik<br />Chitra<br />
  28. 28. Kaushik<br />Stepsisters<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. THEME<br />
  31. 31. “Not easy. It’s not easy for me.”<br />- Kaushik<br />“We are both<br />moving forward, Kaushik.”<br /> - DaD<br />
  32. 32. “Things were<br />different now, of course.”<br />-Kaushik<br />I don’t ask you to care for her,<br />even to like her. I only ask<br />that you understand<br />my decision.<br />-Dad<br />“I did not know how to respond…”<br />The steps are slippery…<br />Why is there no railing?<br />-Chitra<br />The knowledge of death seemed<br />present in both sisters – it was something<br />about the way they carried themselves,<br />something that had broken too soon and had<br />not mended, marking them in spite of <br />their lightheartedness.<br />ADJUSTMENT<br />
  33. 33. “It would remain between the three of us, that in their SILENCE they continued both to protect and to punish me.”<br />SILENCE<br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35. <ul><li> DESCRIPTIVE
  36. 36. USE OF PLAIN LANGUAGE
  37. 37. AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL</li></ul>Characters are often Indian immigrants to America who must navigate between the cultural values of their birthplace and their adopted home<br />
  38. 38. Graphic Credits…<br />http://www.simpsoncrazy.com<br />

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