Humanities I: Year's End
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Humanities I: Year's End Presentation Transcript

  • 1.
  • 2. Birthdate: 11 July 1967
    Birthplace: London, England
    Hometown: Kingston, Rhode Island
    • a daughter of Bengali Indian immigrants
    father: worked as a librarian at the
    University of Rhode Island
    mother: taught her their Bengali heritage
    - had moved from England to the U.S.A.
    - had considered herself an American
  • 3. Educational Attainment
    South Kingstown High School
    Barnard College
    - B.A. English Literature
    Boston University
    - M.A. English
    - M.A. Comparative Literature
    - M.A. Creative Writing
    - Ph.D. Renaissance Studies
  • 4. Works
    addresses sensitive dilemmas in the live of Bengali Indian immigrants, disconnection between the first and second generation of US immigrants
    "When I first started writing I was not conscious that my subject was the Indian-American experience. What drew me to my craft was the desire to force the two worlds I occupied to mingle on the page as I was not brave enough, or mature enough, to allow in life."
  • 5. Some Notable Works
    Interpreter of Maladies (1999)
    a collection of stories of Indian-American experiences (Pulitzer Prize for fiction and PEN award)
    The Namesake (2003)
    a novel, which later had a film adaptation, about generational gap (first and second generation immigrants)
    Unaccustomed Earth (2008)
    a collection of short stories (Pulitzer Prize) (includes second and third generations)
  • 6. Some Notable Works
    Interpreter of Maladies (1999)
    a collection of stories of Indian-American experiences (Pulitzer Prize for fiction and PEN award)
    The Namesake (2003)
    a novel, which later had a film adaptation, about generational gap (first and second generation immigrants)
    Unaccustomed Earth (2008)
    a collection of short stories (Pulitzer Prize) (includes second and third generations)
  • 7.
  • 8. Kaushik
    - narrator
    - 21 years old
    - born in 1965 at Cambridge, Massachusetts
    - 9 years old: went to Bombay, India
    • 16 years old: went back to Cambridge, Massachusetts
    after his mother got sick
    - 18 years old: his mother died
    - studied at Swarthmore; lived in a dorm
  • 9. Kaushik’s Father
    - 55 years old
    - had his first job at Cambridge, Massachusetts
    - first married in 1962 (arranged marriage)
    • after wife got sick, he would arrive home with flowers,
    and would go to work late
    • wrote Bengali poems and read them to his wife
    but stopped when she died
    • married Chitra, whom he met for just a few weeks
    and had only seen twice before their marriage
    • reason for remarrying: he was tired of coming home to
    an empty house
  • 10. Kaushik’s Mother
    • married in 1962 (arranged marriage) and
    moved to Massachusetts
    • would occasionally return to Calcutta to cheer up
    her parents
    • was fond of the ocean and swimming and
    modern architecture
    - died at the age of 42 because of cancer
    - her ashes were tossed from a boat off the Gloucester coast
    • her jewelries were distributed to the poor women in
    Calcutta who had worked for their extended family
    as ayahs or cooks or maids
  • 11. Chitra
    - 35 years old (20 years younger than her 2nd husband)
    - lost her spouse to encephalitis two years before
    ­ a schoolteacher
    - traditional
    - had two daughters: Rupa and Piu
    - didn’t speak English well
    - asked Kaushik to call her Mamoni
  • 12. Chitra’s Daughters
    Rupa
    • 10 years old
    Piu
    - 7 years old
  • 13. Kaushik’s Maternal Grandparents
    • didn’t believe when their grandchild, Kaushik, and
    his father told them that their daughter died
    • they were still hoping that their daughter would come
    back, boarding a plane once again
  • 14. Jessica
    • Kaushik’s girlfriend whom he met at Spanish class
    Mrs. Gharibian
    • middle-aged woman with short brown hair and
    a soft Southern accent
    • Kaushik’s mother’s nurse
    Zarin
    - family cook at Bombay
  • 15.
  • 16. Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    This was where the family of Kaushik moved after his mother got sick. Before moving, they had been living in Bombay, India.
    • Their house was a stark structure of concrete and glass that Kaushik’s mother preferred more than the shingled, shuttered homes typical of the towns
    • 17. Modernist architecture, proximal to the ocean, somewhat isolated, enormous, “more befitting of an institution than a private home”
    • 18. Where the new wife of Kaushik’s father and her children moved
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    It was set during the Christmas Season
    • Probably in the 1980’s since Kaushik’s parents married in 1962 and Kaushik is 21 in the story.
    • 19. Jimi Hendrix, Paul Strand – icons who were famous during Kaushik’s adolescent year; cassettes were famous in the 1980’s; Family Feud; Dunkin’ Donuts
    • 20. Winter
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23. Introduction
    Point of Attack
    Complication
    Climax
    Resolution
  • 24.
  • 25. Characters
    Environment
  • 26. Kaushik
    Father
  • 27. Kaushik
    Chitra
  • 28. Kaushik
    Stepsisters
  • 29.
  • 30. THEME
  • 31. “Not easy. It’s not easy for me.”
    - Kaushik
    “We are both
    moving forward, Kaushik.”
    - DaD
  • 32. “Things were
    different now, of course.”
    -Kaushik
    I don’t ask you to care for her,
    even to like her. I only ask
    that you understand
    my decision.
    -Dad
    “I did not know how to respond…”
    The steps are slippery…
    Why is there no railing?
    -Chitra
    The knowledge of death seemed
    present in both sisters – it was something
    about the way they carried themselves,
    something that had broken too soon and had
    not mended, marking them in spite of
    their lightheartedness.
    ADJUSTMENT
  • 33. “It would remain between the three of us, that in their SILENCE they continued both to protect and to punish me.”
    SILENCE
  • 34.
  • 35.
    • DESCRIPTIVE
    • 36. USE OF PLAIN LANGUAGE
    • 37. AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL
    Characters are often Indian immigrants to America who must navigate between the cultural values of their birthplace and their adopted home
  • 38. Graphic Credits…
    http://www.simpsoncrazy.com