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The School Bully

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Colleagues partnered on this Power Point on School Bullying

Colleagues partnered on this Power Point on School Bullying

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  • Bullying has always been a tremendous concern for me takes all kinds of forms-sometimes it can be hard to recognize it. That is why we parents are here to safeguard and help our children against bullying by creating an environment that helps your child build friendships towards others. As a way of helping everyone especially the parents, who find it quite hard to manage time, I found this great application which featured a safety app which gets me connected to a Safety Network or escalate my call to the nearest 911 when needed, it has other cool features that are helpful for your kids with just a press of a Panic Button. Check it here: http://www.SafeKidZone.com/
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    The School Bully The School Bully Presentation Transcript

    • Our School District
    • Staff Development 2009 Session One
    • THE BULLY
    • Have you witnessed BULLYING behavior?
    • There are several types of BULLYING Relationships
    • Student to Student
    • Teacher to Student
    • Student to Teacher
    • Workplace
    • CYBER BULLYING is g r o w i n g
    • B The National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center Reports
    • 5.7 million students are involved as a BULLY or target of BULLYING
    • In a recent national survey of students grade 6-10
    • 13% reported being a target of BULLYING
    • Y BULLYING is most likely to occur
    • In schools that lack adult supervision during breaks
    • Y Where rules against BULLYING are not consistently enforced
    • ING And where teachers and students are indifferent to BULLYING behavior
    • The 3rd highest rate of school BULLYING in the U.S.
    • ILLINOIS
    • The American Justice Department reports this month
    • Y 1 out of every 4 youth
    • Y Will be abused by another student
    • 1 of 5 students
    • Admit to being a BULLY
    • 8% of students
    • Y Deal with their fear of BULLIES
    • ING By missing 1 day of class per month
    • BULLYING isn’t a problem
    • That one TEACHER can resolve
    • That one SCHOOL can resolve
    • An integrated effort by SCHOOL and COMMUNITY is required for results
    • BULLYING is a worldwide problem
    • We can learn from the WORLD Community but our LOCAL Community must work with us
    • 4 Let’s work TOGETHER to UNDERSTAND and ELIMINATE this problem in our school district
    • Y THE BULLY
    • Professional Development Planning Bullying in our School
    • Group Work
        •  
      •  
      •  
      • See the handout in your binder
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      •  
      •  
      • Bullying is not confined to country, religion, ethno-cultural groups
      •  
      • It is a world-wide predicament
      •  
      •   
      •  
      • (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
    • Research Student to Student
      • Some general stats :
        • 1 in 4 are bullied monthly by peers
      •  
        • 160,000 students skipped school for fear of being bullied
        • Teasing, being bullied, and rejection tops the list of triggers in childhood attemps at suicide
      •  
      • (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • General descriptions:
      •  
        • The Bully- Individual who commits the act
      •  
        • The Bullied- The person on the receiving end of the bullying
      •  
        • The Bystander- The person who sees the act and decides to act or not
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • Why do they do what they do?
      •  
        • Research shows that they do what they do because of how they were treated
      •  
      • (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • What are the three types?
      •  
        • Verbal (Precursor)
      • -Accounts for 70%
      • -Acts: name calling, taunting, teasing, belittling, racist slurs, sexually abusive remarks
      •   
      • (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • What are the three types?
      • 2. Physical bullying (Most visible)
      •        -Accounts for less than 30%
      •         -Acts: punching, biting, kicking, choking, scratching, spitting
      •  
      • This type of bullying is the most troublesome of them all because it may lead to the bully becoming an adult criminal 
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • What are the three types?
      • 3. Relational Aggression
            • Objective is to destroy the self-esteem of the bullied
            • Ignore, isolate, exclude, taunt, gossip, writing notes, rumors
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      • Studies have shown that anyone can be a target and that over time those targeted change:
      • Emotionally
      • Physically
      • - Will become frail and insecure or bullies
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
    • Research Student to Student
      •    
      • Bullycide
      •  
      • Columbine
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •   
    • Research Student to Student
      •  
      • The Bystander
      • Ommission and commision
      •  
      • These individuals have abandonded ethical and moral resposiblity
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      • Olweus Model
      • Four Step Approach
      • Our Professional Development Plan uses this framework
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      •   Olweus Model
      • Step One:  
      • Create an environment in which children and adults feel secure to help both the bullied and bully by telling
      •  
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      •   Olweus Model
      • Step Two:  
      • Replace the age old mentality of fight them or ignore them with new dialogue that engages the bully and forces the individual to deal with his interpersonal behaviors and skills in a meaningful way
      •  
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      • Olweus Model
      • Step Three:  
      • Teach effective self managing/ anger management techniques to children and adults
      •  
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      • Olweus Model
      • Step Four:  
      • Provide empathy training for children and adults
      •  
      •   (Levinson & Levinson, 2005)
      •  
      •  
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      •   Positive Behavior Intervention Supports
      •  
      • Respect Education
      • Respect Environment
      • Respect Everyone
      • Creating cool tools
      •  
      •   (PBIS, 2008)
    • Best Practices Student to Student
      • Character Counts
        • Trustworthiness
        • Respect
        • Responsibility
        • Fairness
        • Caring 
        • Citizenship
      •  
      •  
      •   (charactercounts.org/sixpillars.html, 2008)
      •  
      •  
    • THE FACULTY BULLY Research Teacher to Student
        • What
        • Why
        • Cost to Student
      Research Teacher to Student
        • What
        • Why
        • Cost to Student
        • Climate Assessment
        • Solution Finding
      Research Teacher to Student
      • TARGET?
      • (2005 Atlanta National Bullying Prevention Conference)
        • ½ student reported teacher bullied whole class
        • ½ students reported teacher bullied 1-2 students
      • Whole class= crazy teacher
      • Sole Target= something wrong w/ me
      Research Teacher to Student
    • Negative Pedagogy . . . Areas: Coercive misuse of power 1. discipline and student relationships 2. evaluation 3. student grouping 4. classroom/school procedures & rules 5. instructional practices 6. physical plant/resources PAUL & SMITH (2002) Research Teacher to Student
    • Devine, (1996), has pointed out that some teachers use the “code of the streets” (tough language, four letter words, intimidation, tough demeanor, and tough posturing), as a way to exert power and authority. Often children and even other teachers and principals praise such teachers as being effective. They are respected because they are people not to be messed with. FEAR IMPAIRS THE CAPACITY TO LEARN Research Teacher to Student
      • SOLUTION?
        • CODE OF CONDUCT FOR STAFF
        • REPORTING SYSTEM NO REPRISALS
        • PEER GUIDANCE CODE PHRASE
        • PERIODIC CLIMATE SURVEYS
      Research Teacher to Student
      • http://www.endbullyingnow.blogspot.com
        • Open source solution finding: WORLDWIDE
        • Platform for Local Discussion
        • Reference List
        • Weblinks
        • Surveys
        • Local Research Results
      Research Teacher to Student
    • THE STUDENT TO TEACHER BULLY Research Student to Teacher
    • Research and Best Practice Student to Teacher Bullying
      • Under reported with little research base
      • Often misrepresented as threatening behavior or other student discipline issues
      • Teacher victims are mostly inexperienced and female
      •  
      • Usually results from the following:
        • Uncomfortable in the teacher leadership role
        • Unprepared for the challenges of student discipline
        • Unreported because it is professionally threatening
        • Sometimes linked to a culture of school violence
      Research and Best Practice Student to Teacher Bullying
        • 36% of teachers reported being bullied by students
        • (Ontario Secondary Teachers)
      •  
        • Blogging, posting, tweeting, cyberbullying
      •  
        • Video recording and Internet posting
      Research and Best Practice Student to Teacher Bullying
        • Establish support systems for new, inexperienced teachers.
        • Mentors, frequent classroom visits, open culture can help young teachers
        • Student discipline training must be a priority
        • Help young teachers grow and establish themselves as classroom leaders 
      •  
      Research and Best Practice Student to Teacher Bullying
    • Sid Citrus, Bully-Asshole Boss http://www.sidcitrus.com/Site/Episode_1.html Research Workplace Bullying
    • Research Workplace Bullying
      •  
      •   75% of all employees had been affected by workplace bullying (Blando,2008)
      •   13% of U.S. emplyees currently being bullied, 24% have been bullied in the past (WBI-Zogby)
      • Women appear to be at a greater risk  57%
      • Men are more likely to be bullies- 60%
      • Women bullies target other women- 71%
      • (Workplace Bullying Institute, 2007)
      Research Workplace Bullying
      • Race plays a role
      • Hispanics (52.1%)
      • African-Americans (46%)
      • Whites (33.5%)
      • Asian-Americans (30.6%)
      • Workplace Bullying Institute (2007)
      Research Workplace Bullying
      • Health Effects
      • Stress
      • Poor Mental Health
      • Poor Physical Health
      • Increase of use of sick days
      • The Project for Wellness and Work-Life
      • Arizona State University
      Research Workplace Bullying
      • Witnesses of bullying suffer from:
            • Fear
            • Stress
            • Emotional exhaustion
      •  
      •  
        • The Project for Wellness and Work-Life
        • Arizona State University
      Research Workplace Bullying
      • Financial impact:
      • $19 Billion loss of employment due to mental illness, $3 Billion drop in productivity (National Institute of Occupational Safety Health)
      • $1.2 Million per every 1,000 employees to replace those bullied or witnesses to bullying
      • (Rayner and Keashly, 2004)
      Research Workplace Bullying
      • False accusations
      • Nonverbal intimidation
      • Presumably uncontrollable mood swings
      • Making up own rules then not following them
      • Harsh and constant criticism
      • Rumors or gossip
      • Singling out one person
      • Public displays of gross, undignified behavior
      • Yelling, screaming, throwing tantrums
      • Lying about performances
      • Workplace Bullying Institute (2007)
      Research Workplace Bullying
    • Components of the Plan - Phase 1
      • Professional Development Planning
      • (Friend and Cook, 2007)
        •   You are the plan!
          •   Staff experience and expertise
          •   We all benefit from the solution
          •   Implementation, application, and monitoring
          • Your data pointed to the problem and will help guide our solution
          • SMART Goals
    • Components of the Plan - Phase 2
      • Professional Development Planning
        • However...."best practice" is important
        • Content expertise brings additional knowledge and experience
        • Use of research to determine what works
        • Learn from others who have experienced similar issues
    • Components of the Plan - Phase 3
      • Professional Development Planning
        • Post speaker small group work
          • Application in the school and classroom
          • Support teachers as colleagues
          • Monitor our work
          • Rachet up accountability
          • Begin to change the culture
      •  
    • Components of the Plan - Phase 4
      • Professional Development Planning
        •   Guiding taskforce with representatives from small groups
          •   Review data, report small group work, identify ongoing issues, monitor progress
          •   Continue to communicate vision, encourage new cultural expectations 
    • Components of the Plan - Phase 5
      • Professional Development Planning
        • Evaluate our work
      •  
        • Revise and review goals and strategies
      •  
        • Lead the effort to establish new culture
      •  
        • Establish new priorities
      •  
    • Additional Resources
      •  
      • The following information is included in the binder:
      •  
      • References
      • Copies of Articles
      • Internet Resources
      • Bob's Blog
    • Thank You!