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Intro to Photography WebQuest

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Intro to Photography WebQuest Intro to Photography WebQuest Presentation Transcript

  • -Introduction to Photography- Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for Photo I Designed by Mr. Ryan J. Hollen [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] This WebQuest will serve as a means to push you, as a beginning photographer, head-first into the world of photo image making. Throughout this quest, you will become familiar with key compositional concepts that are essential to making a quality photograph.
  • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • This is what you’re going to compile for me on your quest into the world of photography. Below, you’ll see a list of terms that are generally used when composing a photograph. For each term, I’d like you to find an example photograph that illustrates the term. To help you in your quest, you may want to explore some of the online galleries I’ve provided links to in the “Process” section.
    • Alright then! Find a photograph that accurately describes each of the following:
    Title
    • Bug’s-Eye View
    • Aerial View
    • Texture
    • The “Rule of Thirds”
    • Line
      • -Diagonal Line
      • -Radial Lines
      • -Repeating Lines
    • Minimalism (Simplicity)
    • Abstraction
    • Framing
    • Merging (note- you’ll usually want to AVOID doing this)
    • Lighting
      • -Natural Lighting
      • -Side-Lighting
      • -Low Light
      • -Backlighting
    • Portraiture (Please, no kids with bunnies or babies in flower outfits. It angers me, and would make me feel sad for you.)
    Upon completion, your collection of photographs should include: A cover page with your little smiling face and name, and at least 16 photographic examples, one for each term (feel free to use more than one image for each term). The photographs can be color and/or black and white. If it’s been provided, include the artist’s name and the title of the piece. Finally, for each image, write a short explanation (1-2 sentences) for why the image(s) you selected illustrate the term. You will be presenting the findings from your quest to me. How you choose to do so is up to you- you may create a booklet, use a PowerPoint, etc. Be creative! I have to grade a lot of these, and you get points for keeping me awake. Probably.
  • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • If you’re finding yourself in a rut, fret not young grasshopper. What sort of quest would I send you on without the proper tools? These handy websites provided by Kodak can help explain what all these terms mean, and assist you in knowing what you’re looking for. Just remember, don’t use the photographs from the Kodak website for your example! Believe me- I’ll know if you did. I want you to find your own examples.
    • Kodak's Guidelines for Better Photographic Composition
    • Kodak's Photo Tips
    • Here’s how you go about getting those photographs off the magic internet computer box and onto paper or PowerPoint.
    • First, find a photograph that illustrates a key term. Place the mouse over the photograph, and right click. Select “Save Image As…” from the pop-up menu.
    • Once you select “Save Image As…” you’ll be prompted to save the file somewhere on your hard-drive. I suggest saving to a “My Pictures” folder, or creating a new folder specifically for this assignment.
    • Finally, once you have found and saved all your images, open Microsoft Word or PowerPoint, or whatever program you’ve chosen for your presentation. Getting the image onto a page in Word or a slide in PowerPoint should be as easy as clicking on the “Insert” option on the task bar, and selecting “Picture” from the drop-down menu. You’ll be taken to your “My Pictures” folder, where you should find all those pretty photographs you’ve saved!
    • How you choose to compile these images, you’ll remember, is entirely up to you. Be creative and have fun with it!
    -Resources- National Geographic Photography Masters of Photography Getty Images Gallery
  • Evaluation Example: Your Rubric! Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Image Accuracy Images chosen reflect little understanding of each term. Images don’t necessarily reflect term. Images chosen reflect a basic understanding of each term. Images are more or less examples of term. Images chosen reflect a good understanding of each term, and each image is thoughtfully chosen. Images chosen reflect a clear understanding of each term, and each image is thoughtfully chosen. Presentation Craftsmanship Presentation is basic. Layout is unclear and/or not thoughtfully composed. Presentation is basic. Layout is sometimes unclear or confused. Presentation is somewhat creative and interesting. Layout is clear and thoughtfully composed. Presentation is creative and interesting. Layout is clear and thoughtfully composed. Cover Page Presentation does not include a cover page. Presentation includes a cover page with student picture and name.
  • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] What will you have gained from this quest into photography? By exploring the works of artists who have effectively utilized the composition terms you’re questing for, you will become more familiar with the anatomy of a photograph. Knowing these terms and how they’re effectively carried out will be an invaluable asset to you as a photographer when composing an image, and they will help you on your search for that perfect photograph!
  • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Title Image by Ryan J. Hollen The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  • Put the Title of the Lesson Here (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for xth Grade (Put Subject Here) Designed by Put Your Name Here Put Your E-mail Address Here Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Begin with something that describes the origin of the lesson. For example: This lesson was developed as part of the San Diego Unified School District's Triton Project, a federally funded Technology Innovation Challenge Grant. In this second paragraph of the introduction, describe briefly what the lesson is about. Remember, the audience for this document is other teachers, not students. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Describe the grade level and course that the lesson is designed to cover. For example: "This lesson is anchored in seventh grade language arts and involves social studies and math to a lesser extent." If the lesson can easily be extended to additional grades and subjects, mention that briefly here as well. Describe what the learners will need to know prior to beginning this lesson. Limit this description to the most critical skills that could not be picked up on the fly as the lesson is given. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • What will students learn as a result of this lesson? Describe the outcomes succinctly. Use the language of existing standards. For example:
    • Social Studies Standards Addressed
      • Recognize the relationships among the various parts of a nation's cultural life.
      • Learn about the mythology, legends, values and beliefs of a people
      • .
    • Most lessons don't just teach a block of content; they also implicitly teach one or more types of thinking. In addition to describing learning outcomes within traditional subject areas, describe what kind of thinking and communications skills were encouraged by this lesson. Inference-making? Critical thinking? Creative production? Creative problem-solving? Observation and categorization? Comparison? Teamwork? Compromise?
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page You can paste in the process description given to students in the “student” process slide and then interleave the additional details that a teacher might need. Describe briefly how the lesson is organized. Does it involve more than one class? Is it all taught in one period per day, or is it part of several periods? How many days or weeks will it take? Is it single disciplinary, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary or what? If students are divided into groups, provide guidelines on how you might do that. If there are misconceptions or stumbling blocks that you anticipate, describe them here and suggest ways to get around them. What skills does a teacher need in order to pull this lesson off? Is it easy enough for a novice teacher? Does it require some experience with directing debates or role plays, for example? If you're designing for a one-computer classroom or for pre-readers and are creating a facilitated WebQuest in which the teacher or an aide controls the computer and guides discussion, you can link from here to the Teacher Script page which would contain a printable script for the facilitator to follow. Variations If you can think of ways to vary the way the lesson might be carried out in different situations (lab vs. in-class, for example), describe them here. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Describe what's needed to implement this lesson. Some of the possibilities:
      • Class sets of books
      • E-mail accounts for all students
      • Specific software (how many copies?)
      • Specific hardware (what kind? How many?)
      • Specific reference material in the classroom or school library
      • Video or audio materials
    • If the lesson makes extensive use of specific websites, it would be appropriate to list, describe and link them here.
    • Describe also the human resources needed. how many teachers are needed to implement the lesson. Is one enough? Is there a role for aides or parents in the room? Do you need to coordinate with a teacher at another school? With a partner in industry or a museum or other entity? Is a field trip designed in as part of the lesson?
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page How will you know that this lesson was successful? Describe what student products or performances you'll be looking at and how they'll be evaluated. This, of course, should be tightly related to the standards and objectives you cited above. You may want to just copy and paste the evaluation section of the student page ( Evaluation ) into this space and add any clarifications needed for another teacher to make use of this lesson. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • The WebQuest model is best suited for learners who can navigate the Web on their own and can read the kinds of material commonly found on the Web. We can stretch the format to reach primary-aged learners, developmental English Language Learners and special populations by creating a facilitated WebQuest, one that requires an adult or older peer to drive things.
    • Use this page to create a script for that facilitator. The facilitator would print this page out and use it to guide their progress through the WebQuest.
    • This page will include step by step directions to the facilitator, including:
      • What to say at each point in the process
      • What to click on
      • What questions and misconceptions to anticipate
      • How long to take at each point
      • When to direct learners to work away from the computer
    • To help the facilitator, you might want to include screen dumps of particular screens embedded with the directions of what to do at that point.
    • This page is linked to the Process segment off of the Teacher Page
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Make some kind of summary statement here about the worthiness of this lesson and the importance of what it will teach. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page List here the sources of any images, music or text that you're using. Provide links back to the original source. Say thanks to anyone who provided resources or help. List any books and other analog media that you used as information sources as well. Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion