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  • DEMO UPLOADING AN IMAGE
  • We sense – light comes into our eyes (no mental processes occurring)Select – focus on particular element in our visual plane or field of vision (reasons for this – cues, etc)Perceive – we make sense of what we select – process info, we bring past knowledge with us, all past experience of seeing impacts our interpretation of new images
  • Long term memoryImages are sent via two pathways to our brainsThrough parietal lobes passes to our amygdala – where we assign emotions to imagesthen sends it on to Hippocampi – where long term memory is stored and where we compare new visual messages to those previous for meaning and emotional value. The physiological explanation for how we form a subjective basis for interpreting visual data
  • By connecting a microelectrode to a nerve cell in the visual cortex of a catSpecific cells in the brain respond to 4 kinds of visual stimulation –
  • We look closely at each visual cue that our brains respond to gain insight into how to design compelling visual messages.
  • Color constancy – colors look different depending on lighting conditions When colors under bright conditions they retain their hue, when change when it is dark. (red in the dark looks blue)
  • Vanishing point
  • Vanishing point
  • Vanishing point
  • AFTER THIS, THEN

Transcript

  • 1. VISCOM
    COM 310 W7
  • 2. OUTLINE
    WELCOME
    SYLLABUS
    BLOG
    CHAPTER 1-3
    CHAPTER 4
    ACTIVITY
    PUBLIC SERVICE PRINT ADS
  • 3. SYLLABUS
    ATTENDANCE
    POSITIONING (hybrid, design for non designers, service)
    REQUIRED TEXTS
    ASSIGNMENTS
    WRITTEN
    CREATIVE (e.g.)
    COURSE SCHEDULE
  • 4. CLASS BLOG
  • 5. CHAPTER 1: How we see
    Two premisesfromour text VisCom – Images w/Messages
    Images have the most impact when they are remembered
    Images and text rely on one another,
    -and combined - they can provide compelling messages
  • 6. CHAPTER 1: How we see
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963)
    Seeing a multi-level process
    Sense
    Select
    Perceive
  • 7. CHAPTER 3: Eye, Retina, Brain (what happened to CH2?)
    Eyes and Retina
    Cones in the retina – can lead to color difficiency
    Eyes enters brain via optic nerve (chord of cells)
    Two eyes, slightly separated allow us to see depth
  • 8. CHAPTER 3: Eye, Retina, Brain
    The Brain
    Amygdala (Parietal lobes)
    Hippocampus (temporal lobes)
  • 9. CHAPTERS 4: What the brain sees
    David Hubel & Herbert Wiesel discovered that . . .
  • 10. Four visual cues
    Color
    Form
    Depth
    Movement
  • 11. Color
    Primary – red, green, blue
    Secondary – magenta, yellow, cyan
  • 12. Three ways of discussing color
    Objective
    chroma (hue),
    value (amount of concentration)
    brightness (amount of light emitted)
    Comparative - blood red, sky blue
    Subjective – range of emotional responses to color
    warm and cool colors (psychological distinctions)
    Light (soft and cheerful) and dark (harsh and moody)
  • 13. Color
    Sociological uses of color
    Cultural heritage
    Training
    Personal meaning
    We associate specific meanings with different colors
    Purple – dignity, sadness
    Blue – power to protect
    Green – versatility, ingenuity
    Yellow -health
    White - purity
  • 14. Color
  • 15. Form
    Dots
    Lines
    Shapes
  • 16. Form
    Dots – command attention, create tension
    Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Seurat, 1884)
  • 17. Form
    Lines – draw viewers attention
    Curvy lines are playful
    Straight lines – rigid
    Thick lines – strong
    Thin lines – delicate, timid
  • 18. Form
    Lines – horizon lines
    High lines – suffocation
    Low lines – space to grow
  • 19. Form
    Shapes -
    Parallelogram
    Circle
    Triangle
  • 20. Form
    Shapes – Parallelogram -4 sides, rectangles and squares
    Squares – sturdy, straightforward
    Rectangles – more sophisticated
  • 21. Form
    Shapes – Circle
    Can overpower
    Suggest brightness, wheel of life (eternity, infinite causality)
  • 22. Form
    Shapes – Triangle
    Equilateral – symmetrical balance, serenity
    Isosceles – point draws attention
    Technique - triangulation (made of objects)
  • 23. Form – dots, lines, shapes
  • 24. Depth – 8 depth cues
    Space
    Size
    Color
    Lighting
    Textural gradients (patterned lines)
    Interposition
    Time
    Perspective (illusionary, geometrical, conceptual)
  • 25. Depth – Perspective
  • 26. Depth – Perspective
    Woman Playing the Mandolin (Picasso, 1909)
  • 27. Depth – Movement
    Real
    Apparent (motion pictures)
    Graphic (rhythm)
    Implied (visual vibrations from high contrast lines)
  • 28. ACTIVITY -ANALYZING AN IMAGE
    make an inventory list of all objects in picture
    notice composition (center, periphery)
    study visual cues
  • 29. PUBLIC SERVICE PRINT ADS
    Why Bad Ads Happen to Good Causes
    Studied over 200 public service print ads 1990-2000
    Noted - % remembered seeing the ad
    Associated - % recalled name of advertiser or campaign
    Read Most - % read ½ or more of written material in ad
  • 30. PUBLIC SERVICE PRINT ADS
    7 DESIGN PRINCIPLES
    Capture reader’s attention like a stop sign, direct it like a road map
    Make an emotional connection before conveying info
    Write headlines that offer a reason to read
    Use pictures to attract and convince
    Make text legible
    Test, measure
    When everyone zigs, zag
  • 31. HWK by 9/15
    Read Chapters 2-4
    Due Journal #2
    Play with the blog