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”planning forsocial studiesteaching and  learning”
Planning for lessons and             activities―Receiving and responding phenomena‖    choosing the right /     learning o...
a. Planning ForLessons in Social    Studies
5 Tips For Creating Effective         Lesson Plans    *Think the lesson through in your head.Take time to think about what...
*Plan for distraction Think about questions that may comeup during class and be prepared toanswer them.
*Keep your eye on the clockTime yourself realistically so you know how longeach part of your lesson plan is likely to take...
*Have    three different end points built             into your lessonWhile its important to make sure yourmaterial will n...
* Plan   effective homeworkHome work should not be pure rotememorization. Instead, it shouldstretch the childs imagination...
b.) planning foractivities in social      studies
Preschooler’s :     * community studies Social studies at the preschool levelshould build the students awarenessof himself...
• hands-on activity – an activity intended for children  who are physical and visual learners. e.g. drawing activity- begi...
•Exercise - If you see several students dragging it is time to change activities. Before moving to the next topic it is a ...
•Imagine - After snack or playtime the students may benefit from this activity before moving on to the lesson. The student...
*Clean-up   time    -After an activity or playtime thestudents must clean-up before they canmove on to the next activity.
Teaching     concepts, skills       and valueshttp://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/multimedia/geographic-pers...
a.) Conceptbuilding blocks of knowledge since, it organizes vast amounts of information people encounter everyday.       ...
letting your pupils understand things in more than one way.using broad concepts in continuity and change gives a student...
Things to consider when        developing concept"You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free." I suppose ...
How do you begin to organize              Content?=Center around central concepts andgeneralizations, supported by selecte...
* An  important consideration when developing concept is to keep the language of the definition and the samples meaningful...
b.) skillsthe ability to do something well as a  result of a practice to carry out thebroader processes that promote in-d...
Intellectual skillsthe ability to think reasonably , rationally, logically, and reflectively is central to social studies...
 The social studies skills should be   build in every classroom so that,  students engage in the systematicapproach to le...
Classification of Social         Studies Skills:  thinking skills – ability to gather, interpret, organize, analyze, eval...
c.)Values- Many children are subjected to a lack of moraltraining due to the exigencies of meeting life’snecessities in a ...
4 Basic Approaches inteaching Values to Social         Studies
• inculcation- teaching values and providing  consistent reinforcement for desired behavior.• clarification- helping stude...
Primary grades: accdg to Piaget ―egocentric‖provide experiences that transforms the students.*Dr. Bob Kizlik (Updated Dece...
So I really didnt "teach" my studentshow to teach social studies. That isimpossible. What I did was to motivatethem to wan...
The reason for these understandings is theymay help students develop and nurture valuesthat will make it more likely that ...
UNIT PLANNING   Long term Plan      Planning And Developing UnitsUnit - unit plans are a series of day-to-daylessons relat...
―Abstract‖Unit planning is perhaps the most difficult of theteacher duties to execute well. This paper offerssuggestions f...
THE UNIT- must have a strong introduction, a body of lessonsthat build on each other, and a conclusion that tiesthe thread...
Kirman, 2002; Wright, 2001; Case, 1999)-the accomplished works of these authors shouldbe consulted by any teacher interest...
Units are opportunities to address citizenshipgoals — the knowledge, skills, attitudes andvalues that we as teachers, pare...
What Can We Do?- no teacher approaches theplanning of units in exactly thesame way and, to a certain extent,each teacher m...
Six Steps That Will increase unit focus  and Manageability while cuing students            to the “point of it all”      S...
Step 2: Identify Importance- may seem like strange, abstract questions at  first but the answers are critical for increasi...
Step 3: Create a “Big           Understanding”―Big Understanding‖ as the name forthese generalizations.*Big Understandings...
Step 4: Conclude the Unit- Allowing students to participate in decision-making processes is time consuming but asSchwartz ...
Step 5: Introduce the UnitTeachers need to tell students:1) how student learning will be assessed,2) the criteria by which...
Step 6:            Build the Body of the Unit                                 Create or adapt a lesson that is• Including ...
REFLECTIONS
 I choose the topic concern with planning lessons and activities in Social Studies, Teaching Concepts skills and Values, ...
 I had learn and realize from the presentation the vital yet crucial role of a teacher in a learning environment as a dec...
Being a hardworking teacher is a commitment to one’s profession. They do not count on the good things they have done for ...
Thank You TeacherRiza Joy M. Tabling
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  • Pink panther music in the background???? Or some other mystery music like Inspector Gadget or 007In order to crack the code, there are several tools you must have in your code breaking kit.
  • In order to develop fewer standards, which was our charge from the State Board, we consolidated the 10 thematic strands to the five conceptual strands shown here. Research of state standards across the nation indicates that many Departments of Education have begun writing standards to these five (5) primary strands as well. The organization of the new essential standards also provides a framework by which to organize critical content, concepts, and generalizations that are essential for understanding the disciplines of social studies. Writing standards that are specifically targeted to each conceptual strand ensures that students will receive a greater understanding of each discipline of social studies as well as the relationship among the disciplines. While we have elected to use five strands, students will still be able to draw upon the themes of social studies such as time, continuity, change, power, authority, global connections etc. because these themes are also concepts. As we crosswalk (click on each of the national strands) these five with the 10 Thematic Strands you will see that we have not eliminated anything, just combined. Global connections are embedded in all the strands. 
  • How many people have actually read the new standards? How many have actually had training on understanding the intent of the new standards?For 6th and 7th grades, this isn’t your grandpa’s world history class or your grandma’s world cultures class.. It actually is a world/global studies course that integrates the sub disciplines of social studiesIn sixth grade, students actually begin to study the roots of modern societies in historical context.
  • While this may seem like a large time span to “cover”, you are not necessarily teaching this as a world history class where you must follow lock step and barrel, thousands of years of history. The intent of this course is for students to “uncover” or “discover” how the Earth became populated, how economic, political, and social systems developed and changed over time, how this process occurred in some of the same ways as well as different ways in different civilizations and societies, and the connections to more modern times. They, will continue this study in 7th grade, but looking at more contemporary societies around the world.
  • How many people have actually read the new standards? How many have actually had training on understanding the intent of the new standards?For 6th and 7th grades, this isn’t your grandpa’s world history class or your grandma’s world cultures class.. It actually is a world/global studies course that integrates the sub disciplines of social studiesIn sixth grade, students actually begin to study the roots of modern societies in historical context.
  • While this may seem like a large time span to “cover”, you are not necessarily teaching this as a world history class where you must follow lock step and barrel, thousands of years of history. The intent of this course is for students to “uncover” or “discover” the every increasing connectedness of societies and regions and the complexity of the modern world. The emphasis here is not for student to understand the what and the why, but how understanding the world will lead to better decision-making in the present and future.
  • How many people have actually read the new standards? How many have actually had training on understanding the intent of the new standards?For 6th and 7th grades, this isn’t your grandpa’s world history class or your grandma’s world cultures class.. It actually is a world/global studies course that integrates the sub disciplines of social studiesIn sixth grade, students actually begin to study the roots of modern societies in historical context.
  • Suggestion is to perform this activity together as presenter and participants.As you begin to deconstruct or unpack the new standards, you may want to begin by identifying the concept in the standards such as the example you see here. Then, think about the relationship between and among the concepts. What do you want students to understand from this standard? You should arrive at a generalizations such as…. This may be a major paradigm shift for some in the way that teaches teach and students learn. A concept-based teacher is idea-centered rather than a topic-based teachers that is focused only on covering topics by checking off facts to be memorized. This is a very difficult process for some and will take some getting use to. So as you plan for what professional development is needed in your district, understanding the conceptual structure of the standards may be at the top of your list.Presenter will then guide the participants to the highlighted words (concepts) and ask questions to ensure that they understand why these words are considered concepts. Questions to ask them to consider:Are the words highlighted timeless, universal, abstract, etc.?Do these words transfer across time and space, situations and conditions?Then ask the participants to tell you how many concepts are needed to develop a generalization or what we are calling an understanding or understand statement in our unpacking documents. They should share with you the answer “two or more”.Ask the participants to use their concept sheet to help them share one or two concepts that could also be taught when providing instruction on this objective. Make sure to let them know that these are inferred concepts and that teachers may infer additional concepts that can be taught in addition to the concepts that are directly stated in the objective.Finally, discuss the generalization seen here.
  • To give you some practice, we would like for you to unpack this standard with your group. Use the chart paper to identify the concepts, then, write at least one generalization to support the standard.Follow the process that we just used in the one we unpacked together.
  • To give you some practice, we would like for you to unpack this standard with your group. Use the chart paper to identify the concepts, then, write at least one generalization to support the standard.Follow the process that we just used in the one we unpacked together.
  • Unpack the Standards to see the concepts to begin to formulate the big ideas of the course – some of these are found in the unpacking document – What students should understand
  • For example, if you want to use the five eras of World History as unit foundations, what topics would lend itself to a more in-depth study of each era that are supported by the concepts from the standards? What generalizations would students have to understand for each unit that are both tied to specific strands, but also show the integration of each strand?
  • Overview of the process to bring everyone up to speed on where we are since summer institute and unit development training Districts and charter schools are at different places. Some are at a beginning level and some are at a point where they are ready to begin a process of developing instructional support for teachers to follow.That point is where we begin organizing curriculum into Units of Instruction.This is a process! So as we look at the process we see that there are 5 basic steps in the process. Step 1 you can see asks you to start with a knowledge of the essential standards . This is where you select your course and the standards you will organize into units of instruction. You have already begun to learn the standards so if we were doing this today you would select course or grade.Step 2 is where you begin to organize your units for the year. This step we will look more closely at in a moment.Step 3, you have already done this with the practice you did with the unpacking activities.Step 4 you create a web where you can list and outline the topics and critical content you want to make sure you get in as well as the concepts you want to draw upon.Step 5 is the last step and can only be completed once you have satisfied yourself that you have done all that you need to do in steps 1 through 4.
  • Question: How many of you have your students to develop units?What is your definition of a unit?Brainstorming mechanism that helps connect to what you want and need to teach and focus on when you actually start the teaching of a course.This is really not condusive to doing and creating while you teach. The number of units is just a suggestion. Not a research based proactice. Once teachers and other curriculum designers have a firm understanding of the Essential Standards, the next step is to create a yearly or semester plan for your grade level or course. One way to begin brainstorming what those units will be is by thinking of the units you have already identified support the new Essential Standards based on the Crosswalk documents. Then, think of additional units you may need.
  • Transcript of "111"

    1. 1. ”planning forsocial studiesteaching and learning”
    2. 2. Planning for lessons and activities―Receiving and responding phenomena‖ choosing the right / learning outcomesappropriate topic in may emphasizeaccordance with the compliance in respon-interest of the learners. ding. (motivation)
    3. 3. a. Planning ForLessons in Social Studies
    4. 4. 5 Tips For Creating Effective Lesson Plans *Think the lesson through in your head.Take time to think about what would be the possibleresult of the things you want to accomplish withyour lesson plan and what your students shouldknow in the end.
    5. 5. *Plan for distraction Think about questions that may comeup during class and be prepared toanswer them.
    6. 6. *Keep your eye on the clockTime yourself realistically so you know how longeach part of your lesson plan is likely to take.Then add about 2-3 minutes to each section since,you are bound to have things happen to distract youin class, whether its the kid who shows up late andneeds to make a show out of it, or the kid who isbrainy and asks more complex questions than therest of the class is likely to understand or careabout.
    7. 7. *Have three different end points built into your lessonWhile its important to make sure yourmaterial will not overrun the clock, its equallyimportant not to end too early. This way, youcan keep an eye on the clock as youre actuallyteaching and youll be able to stop when youneed to or continue on if need be.
    8. 8. * Plan effective homeworkHome work should not be pure rotememorization. Instead, it shouldstretch the childs imagination andmake them really think about thelesson.
    9. 9. b.) planning foractivities in social studies
    10. 10. Preschooler’s : * community studies Social studies at the preschool levelshould build the students awarenessof himself, his home, his family, his community and his place.
    11. 11. • hands-on activity – an activity intended for children who are physical and visual learners. e.g. drawing activity- begin developing creative mindsand motor skills .
    12. 12. •Exercise - If you see several students dragging it is time to change activities. Before moving to the next topic it is a good idea to have the students do some exercises. Call on the leader of the day to pick a few exercises (jumping jacks etc.)
    13. 13. •Imagine - After snack or playtime the students may benefit from this activity before moving on to the lesson. The students sit at their tables close their eyes and imagine. The teacher then spends about one or two minutes describing something (like the beach). This has a calming effect on the students.
    14. 14. *Clean-up time -After an activity or playtime thestudents must clean-up before they canmove on to the next activity.
    15. 15. Teaching concepts, skills and valueshttp://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/multimedia/geographic-perspective/?ar_a=1
    16. 16. a.) Conceptbuilding blocks of knowledge since, it organizes vast amounts of information people encounter everyday. ―kabuuang pananaw‖
    17. 17. letting your pupils understand things in more than one way.using broad concepts in continuity and change gives a students a frame of reference for analyzing the human condition past and present.
    18. 18. Things to consider when developing concept"You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free." I suppose I never really understood those lines until I realized the implications of knowledge, of deep understanding, for the predictability and uniformity of behavior.
    19. 19. How do you begin to organize Content?=Center around central concepts andgeneralizations, supported by selectedfacts and information. = Promote student inquiry by usingessential or guiding questions to leadstudents to enduring understandings orgeneralizations.
    20. 20. * An important consideration when developing concept is to keep the language of the definition and the samples meaningful to the target students.
    21. 21. b.) skillsthe ability to do something well as a result of a practice to carry out thebroader processes that promote in-depth understanding of a topic or issue.―Skills are the tools of lifelong learning; they must be developed and practiced across grade levels‖
    22. 22. Intellectual skillsthe ability to think reasonably , rationally, logically, and reflectively is central to social studies. A teacher should use variety of intellectual skills to master content.Social studies classes should offer many opportunities for research activities.
    23. 23.  The social studies skills should be build in every classroom so that, students engage in the systematicapproach to learning and learned how to process information.
    24. 24. Classification of Social Studies Skills:  thinking skills – ability to gather, interpret, organize, analyze, evaluate and synthesize information.  thinking strategies – processing information as students engage inproblem-solving, decision making, inquiry and conceptualizing.
    25. 25. c.)Values- Many children are subjected to a lack of moraltraining due to the exigencies of meeting life’snecessities in a single parent home. Almost half ofpeople believe that it’s too late to teach values toteenagers. We need to start earlier, as soon as childcomes to school. Learning activities can be developedto help students evolve their values living in amulticultural society.
    26. 26. 4 Basic Approaches inteaching Values to Social Studies
    27. 27. • inculcation- teaching values and providing consistent reinforcement for desired behavior.• clarification- helping students to become aware of their own values.• moral reasoning- helping students to develop moral ethical principles for guiding their actions.• Values analysis- helping students develop careful, discriminating analysis to examine values questions.
    28. 28. Primary grades: accdg to Piaget ―egocentric‖provide experiences that transforms the students.*Dr. Bob Kizlik (Updated December 26, 2012)social studies is about understanding things, and notvery much about learning skills.=I think Albert Einstein put this idea best when hesaid that "scientific theories should be able to bedescribed so simply that a child could understandthem." In social studies, we have a long, long way togo.=
    29. 29. So I really didnt "teach" my studentshow to teach social studies. That isimpossible. What I did was to motivatethem to want to learn about social studiesand different ways of teaching it. Theycome to believe that they dont understandanything unless they understand it inmore than one way. I believe I wassuccessful at doing this, and it is a goodfeeling.
    30. 30. The reason for these understandings is theymay help students develop and nurture valuesthat will make it more likely that they will beable to determine for any situation what theright thing is and do it, especially when doingthe right thing is hard to do. It is aboutdecency, respect, courage and honor. This isnot a difficult idea to understand, but it cantake a lifetime to appreciate. "Anything notunderstood in more than one way is notunderstood at all"
    31. 31. UNIT PLANNING Long term Plan Planning And Developing UnitsUnit - unit plans are a series of day-to-daylessons related to a particular theme.-The unit can take anywhere from a weekto six weeks to complete (though term orsemester long efforts do occur).
    32. 32. ―Abstract‖Unit planning is perhaps the most difficult of theteacher duties to execute well. This paper offerssuggestions for improving focus and increasing themeaningfulness of thematic unit content for students. Return to ArticlesStressing the concept of a Big Understanding, it Abstractoutlines 6 sequential steps in the creation of unitswhich, when applied, not only establish a purpose forthe study of the material, but also foster the growthof citizens who are self-actualized, learned,contributing members of a global society.
    33. 33. THE UNIT- must have a strong introduction, a body of lessonsthat build on each other, and a conclusion that tiesthe threads together and leads to summativeassessment.To meet different learning styles, a variety ofengaging student activities some of which demandcritical thinking and compound it all with anobligation to meet the requirements of the coursecurriculum and you get a sense of how difficult thistask can be!
    34. 34. Kirman, 2002; Wright, 2001; Case, 1999)-the accomplished works of these authors shouldbe consulted by any teacher interested ingaining an expertise in unit plan development.-we should center our attention on thematicunit plans offering suggestions for improvingfocus and increasing the meaningfulness ofunit content for students.
    35. 35. Units are opportunities to address citizenshipgoals — the knowledge, skills, attitudes andvalues that we as teachers, parents, schools,communities and provincial and nationalleaders believe are important for children tolearn to be ―educated‖ citizens as well ascontributing members of society. As such, wemust develop thoughtful units that are coherentand focused as well as meaningful to students.
    36. 36. What Can We Do?- no teacher approaches theplanning of units in exactly thesame way and, to a certain extent,each teacher must find their ownstyle.
    37. 37. Six Steps That Will increase unit focus and Manageability while cuing students to the “point of it all” Step 1: Limit the Scope of the UnitIf adapting a pre-made unit which races from topicto topic within the theme, consider excising somelessons and expanding others or incorporating thepossibility of student choice (i.e., students mustcomplete activities related to two of the six thematictopics and demonstrate their learning to the class insome manner).
    38. 38. Step 2: Identify Importance- may seem like strange, abstract questions at first but the answers are critical for increasing focus and developing meaning for students.- Simply by answering the question ―what is the point of teaching this topic to students‖ or ―what makes this topic important‖ teachers are on their way to developing units that have increased focus and meaningfulness for students.
    39. 39. Step 3: Create a “Big Understanding”―Big Understanding‖ as the name forthese generalizations.*Big Understandings are the significantand hopefully enduring points we, asteachers, want students to know,understand and appreciate by the end ofthe unit.
    40. 40. Step 4: Conclude the Unit- Allowing students to participate in decision-making processes is time consuming but asSchwartz and Pollishuke (2002) suggest it alsoinfuses them with a sense of empowerment andcontrol over their educational destiny whilealso helping to achieve educative goals such asthe teaching of responsibility and criticalthinking.
    41. 41. Step 5: Introduce the UnitTeachers need to tell students:1) how student learning will be assessed,2) the criteria by which student demonstration oflearning will be evaluated or judged, and3) the Big Understanding statement.
    42. 42. Step 6: Build the Body of the Unit Create or adapt a lesson that is• Including lessons and fun and enhances learning activities into a unit whose about the Big Understanding. primary feature is their the unit unfolds teachers entertainment value explicitly relate individual distracts from student lessons and activities to the Big appreciation and Understanding. consideration of the overall message.
    43. 43. REFLECTIONS
    44. 44.  I choose the topic concern with planning lessons and activities in Social Studies, Teaching Concepts skills and Values, and planning and developing Units because, it would serve as a framework for a teacher’s daily routine in classroom teaching. A teacher’s effectiveness in teaching lies on the correct sequence and rightful decisions made by them in planning for a short-tem or long-term plan. And we should be guided with the necessary steps systematically for this would direct us in the teaching process.
    45. 45.  I had learn and realize from the presentation the vital yet crucial role of a teacher in a learning environment as a decision maker, facilitator and collaborator and this can only be fulfilled best if the teacher would be familiar or aware with the necessary things that they need to consider in planning. Being a good lesson planner would be your edge as a teacher with the others if we would find time to develop our ability in formulating a good plan.
    46. 46. Being a hardworking teacher is a commitment to one’s profession. They do not count on the good things they have done for the school instead, they would find for better ways to influence the lives of their learners by formulating a good or even the best plan. This would be the chance for a teacher to provide their students a long-term learning by touching their hearts, minds and life through a good plan that leads to effective teaching.
    47. 47. Thank You TeacherRiza Joy M. Tabling
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