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Day 1
 

Day 1

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  • The deep structure of the problem is so well represented in their memory that they immediately saw that structure when they read the problem. We can teach students maxims about how to think. Cognitive scientists refer to these maxims as metacognitive strategies. They are little chunks of knowledge – like look for a problem’s deep structure or consider both sides of an issue – that students can learn and then use to steer their thoughts in more productive directions. These strategies are great, but they only get us part of the way there. Students still need the knowledge necessary to implement the strategy.
  • How students come to forgo naïve conceptions of motion and replace them with an understanding of physics
  • Knowing that you need to control a variable is not the same as knowing which variable to control. Knowing which variable will matter and which ones won’t requires, domain knowledge.
  • You can generate multiple hypotheses for any given situation. Car A gets better gas mileage than Car B. There are many differences between the cars, so which will you investigate first? Engine size? Tire pressure? A key determinant of the hypothesis you select is plausibility. You won’t choose to investigate something that you don’t think contributes to the difference in gas mileage. One’s judgement about the plausibility of a factor being important is based on one’s knowledge of domains.
  • Processes of Thinking intertwined with the content of thought (domain knowlede)

Day 1 Day 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to the
    Fleet Inquiry Institute
    at the
    Reuben H. Fleet Science Center
  • Who We Are
  • Housekeeping
  • Why are we here this week?
  • TEACHERS
  • San Diego Science Project Opportunities
    Networking
    Connection between UCSD, Fleet, and Classroom
    Sharing Best Practices
    Plugging into a Larger Community of Practitioners
    Collaboration
    Support for Classroom Lessons
    Leadership
    Sitting at the Table
    Professional Growth
  • California Science Project
    Our network provides high quality, standards-based professional development in science to ensure that every student achieves the highest standards of academic performance. We do this by:
    Developing teachers’ content knowledge and expanding their teaching strategies
    Supporting teachers in the effective use of state frameworks, content standards, and instructional materials
    Focusing on academic English language development
    Creating a pool of expert teacher leaders and university scholars to conduct programs that translate California’s educational policies into sound classroom practices
    Linking universities, schools/districts together in partnerships  
  • California Science Project
  • California Science Project
    San Diego
    Science Project
  • Agenda
    Process Skill Exploration: Geometry Playground
    The Craft and Process of Scientific Explanation
    Lunch
    The Role of Evidence in the
    Hands-On Science Classroom
  • Process Skills
  • Process and Critical Thinking Skills
  • A treasure hunter is going to explore a cave up on a hill near a beach. He suspected that there may be many paths inside the cave so he was afraid he might get lost. Obviously, he did not have a map of the cave; all he had with him were some common items such as a flashlight and a bag. What could he do to make sure he did not get lost trying to get back out of the cave later?
  • A treasure hunter is going to explore a cave up on a hill near a beach. He suspected that there may be many paths inside the cave so he was afraid he might get lost. Obviously, he did not have a map of the cave; all he had with him were some common items such as a flashlight and a bag. What could he do to make sure he did not get lost trying to get back out of the cave later?
  • It was a chief’s custom every year to go down river to the next village to collect taxes. To assess the amount of taxes, the chief would bring a stone statue and ask for the statue’s weight in gold coins. His method of measuring the amount was to put the statue in a large tub at one end of a hanging balance scale and hook the other end of the scale to another large tub to be filled with gold coins until the scale balanced the weight of the statue. During a recent trip to collect taxes, the chief forgot to bring his scale. How can he figure out how much gold to take to match the statue’s weight without:
    a balance scale,
    a pulley system, or
    a conventional scale?
  • It was a chief’s custom every year to go down river to the next village to collect taxes. To assess the amount of taxes, the chief would bring a stone statue and ask for the statue’s weight in gold coins. His method of measuring the amount was to put the statue in a large tub at one end of a hanging balance scale and hook the other end of the scale to another large tub to be filled with gold coins until the scale balanced the weight of the statue. During a recent trip to collect taxes, the chief forgot to bring his scale. How can he figure out how much gold to take to match the statue’s weight without:
    a balance scale,
    a pulley system, or
    a conventional scale?
  • Process and Critical Thinking Skills in Science
    • Thought processes are intertwined with what is being thought about
    • Thinking scientifically is dependent on domain knowledge and practice
  • Thinking Like a Scientist
    How students acquire scientific concepts
    Thinking Scientifically
    • Developing a model
    • Designing an experiment
    • Gathering data from an experiment
    • Interpreting data in light of model
  • I need to create a control group of grasshoppers that are isolated and do not come into physical contact with anyone or anything.
    I know that by rubbing the back legs of the grasshopper will induce gregarious behavior.
    I need a control group to conduct a fair experiment.
  • I know that there is a change in the size of the X gland in the brains of grasshoppers exhibiting gregarious behavior in comparison to the control group of grasshoppers.
    How does the size of the X gland directly affect specific grasshopper behaviors during gregarious phases.
    I need to ask an investigable question.
  • Background knowledge is necessary to reason scientifically.
  • Insert VTS Image Here to introduce CER Framework
  • Insert slides here to introduce the CER with examples and how to introduce it in class
  • Critical Thinking Skills
    and Process Skills
  • Critical Thinking Skills
    and Process Skills
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