Visual Presentations and Graphical Data

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Visual Presentations and Graphical Data

  1. 1. V I S UA L P R E S E N TAT I O N S A picture is worth a thousand words
  2. 2. MEANING & DEFINITION “By a 'visual representation' I mean roughly an item that is both visible itself, and which purports to represent some actual subject, in such a way that the representing item is in some way similar to, or recognizable as, the purported actual subject; and which item has a representational content or subject matter that may or may not accurately characterize any actual subject. Pictorial representation is one species of visual representation.” – John Dilworth (varieties of visual presentation)
  3. 3. METHODS OF VISUAL PRESENTATIONS Tabulated data Maps Line Graphs Cartograms Bar Graphs Flow charts Gantt Charts Visual Planning Boards Pie Charts Computer Graphics Pictograms
  4. 4. TABULATED DATA Tabulated data is data that has been sorted, organized and represented in a tabular form. Use of tabulated data: Tabulated data is used when a heavy amount data needs to be accessed and analyzed at a glance.
  5. 5. EXAMPLE OF TABULATED DATA
  6. 6. LINE GRAPH Line graph is a type of graph, which displays information as a series of data points connected by straight line segments. Use of line graph: Line graphs are used to show the differenceprogress of something over time, like the sales of a CD, students attending a school, etc.
  7. 7. EXAMPLE OF A LINE GRAPH
  8. 8. BAR GRAPHS Use of Bar Graphs: Bar charts may be displayed as : Vertical Bars Comparisons Horizontal Bars Percentage Single Bars Ratio Multiple Bars
  9. 9. EXAMPLE OF BAR GRAPH Drunkards 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Tequila Shots Vodka Shots
  10. 10. GANTT CHART  A Gantt chart is a type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule.  Gantt charts illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Uses of Gantt Charts:  Comparison between a work that has been scheduled and work that has been accomplished.
  11. 11. EXAMPLE OF A GANTT CHART
  12. 12. PICTOGRAMS  Pictography is a form of writing which uses representational, pictorial drawings.  It conveys its meaning through its pictorial resemblance  They have a graphical nature and fairly realistic style  Ancient Chinese, Sumerian, and Egyptian civilizations began to use such symbols over 5000 years ago.
  13. 13. EXAMPLES OF PICTOGRAMS
  14. 14. MAPS Maps are effective visual aid. Consider the weather forecast maps shown on television. Maps are also sent to show company’s location.  Maps have obvious advantage over the written word.
  15. 15. EXAMPLE OF A MAP
  16. 16. FLOW CHARTS  A flow chart is a graphical or symbolic representation of a process .  The flow chart symbols are linked together with arrows showing the process flow direction. Use of Flow Charts:  To study a process for improvement.  When better communication is needed between people involved with the same process.
  17. 17. EXAMPLE OF A FLOWCHART
  18. 18. PIE CHARTS A pie chart (or a circle graph) is a circular chart divided into sectors, illustrating proportion.. Use of Pie charts: Pie charts are good at showing the comparative sizes of multiple objects.
  19. 19. EXAMPLE OF A PIE CHARTS
  20. 20. CARTOGRAMS  A cartogram is a map in which some thematic mapping variable – such as travel time or Gross National Product – is substituted for land area or distance.  Geometry or space of the map is distorted in order to convey the information of this alternate variable  Main types of cartograms: area and distance cartograms  A distance cartogram is used to show relative travel times and directions from vertices in a network.
  21. 21. EXAMPLE OF A CARTOGRAM
  22. 22. VISUAL PLANNING BOARD It is a virtual board which is built up to show any type of activities done or to be done over a specific period of time. There are simple paper and magnetic visual boards Uses of visual planning boards: It offers flexibility and ease of updating  It helps in realistic forward planning
  23. 23. EXAMPLE OF A VISUAL PLANNING BOARD
  24. 24. COMPUTER GRAPHICS  Mostly people find it difficult to read and remember information  They prefer to information in the form of graphics which is visually attractive and easily interpreted  Data can be quickly and easily interpreted through the medium of graphics  Most simplest form of graphic presentation are the graphs and pie charts  MNCs have started using Graphical software for better understanding and efficient working
  25. 25. EXAMPLE OF COMPUTER GRAPHICS
  26. 26. All presentation rooms are too to children Presenters and rehearsals are similarsmall, too and The most yougiven, blame anyyoufaint.most will be point Credit istoocriticalbetimeorareistoodoeverythingneed. WhateverAllTheytooforandtooon togracefullyor all to Allmicrophonesthey presentation over. beAll screensofarebudgetit, but it's . rarely forgotdark, are hot, too it it taken. will projectorswhattoobe to do right. bright,YOUalways say isexperttobroken. There is will homework:never the Visual Presentations Murphy’slarge, timethatbudgetsmall. cold Laws at least once.do mizpeled of these depending upon whom you ask.. done.
  27. 27. DEADLY SINS OF VISUAL PRESENTATIONS
  28. 28. RANSOM NOTE DESIGN Just because you have access to 350 fonts mean does not that that you arerequired use them.them. A mean you are required to to use A single single font throughout an entire presentation font throughout an entire presentation is usually is usually quite sufficient. Use quite sufficient. Use bold, italic, underline, quotations bold, italic, underline, quotations and/or and/or color changes to emphasize or subdue key colour changes to emphasize or subdue key points or words. points or words.
  29. 29. THE ILLEGIBLE IMAGE Images not clearly seen by the entire audience add confusion and distraction. If you have to say "I know you can't read this but.....," why include the visual at all? One popular rule of thumb is the "8H" rule of legibility. In a nutshell, if you can read an image from eight times its height, odds are your audience will be able to read it when projected
  30. 30. THE USELESS IMAGE Images should be designed to please the mind as well as the eye of the viewer. If an image has no specific place or purpose in a presentation other than "it is pretty", it should probably be removed.
  31. 31. And again A picture is worth a thousand words.
  32. 32. This presentation is the intellectual property of: Mehul Chandna- 11025 Nakul Singh- 11178 Mayank Punjabi- 11208 Vishesh Sharma- 11243 Amit Chaudhri- 11273 Rishi Taparia- 11332 Thank You

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