Flicker gopu

2,368 views
2,269 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,368
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
445
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Flicker gopu

  1. 1. WIND TURBINE SHADOW FLICKER Prof. Gopu R. Potty, Ph.D. Department of Ocean Engineering University of Rhode Island Narragansett, RI 02882 potty@egr.uri.edu
  2. 2. Shadow Flicker• occurs when the sun passes behind the rotors of  and casts a shadow over neighboring properties. • As the blades rotate, the shadow flicks on and off,  an effect known as shadow flicker.
  3. 3. Shadow FlickerThe likelihood and duration of the effect depends upon: • Direction of the property relative to the turbine • Wind speed and direction • Distance from turbine • Turbine height and rotor diameter  • Time of year and day • Weather conditions (i.e. cloudy days) http://www.currentresults.com/Weather/Rhode‐Island/annual‐weather‐averages.php
  4. 4. Shadow flicker is most pronounced in northern latitudes during winter months because of the lower angle of the sun in the winter sky. Shadows cast close to a turbine will be more intense, distinct and focused.
  5. 5. Shadow Plots1 Day 1 year
  6. 6. Health Concerns• Epileptic seizures  • typically by light flashes 5 to 30 Hz;  Wind turbine flicker if less than 1 Hz• Eye strain, headaches, nausea and  disorientation • mostly anecdotal evidence• Nuisance ‐ intrusive and annoying
  7. 7. EXISTING GUIDELINES AND REGULATIONS Guideline or Regulation Germany 30 hr/year or 30 min/day Denmark 10 hr/year Netherlands 17 days/year or 20 min/day Massachusetts No Limit “minimize flicker” Maine No Limit “avoid unreasonable shadow flicker” New Hampshire 30 hr/year Ohio 30 hr/year Wisconsin 30 hr/year (mitigation required if greater than 20 hrs/year)
  8. 8. Signal Interference• Signal blocking: – behind the turbine for a limited distance creating a  shadow zone – Shadow zone depends on  • material, geometry (height and width) of turbine• Signal Reflection – Reflection when structure is in line of sight to a  transmitter – Reflection depends on  • material, rotational speed of turbine, geometry and  orientation of blades relative to transmitter
  9. 9. Technologies Affected• Television (ghosting) – Lower problem for digital signals • Satellite Television – Rarely a problem since signals are received from  very high• FM and DBA radio:  – Interference possible only within few 10’s of  meters• Scanning telemetry systems:  – Work in the UHF band and hence susceptible to  multi‐path effects from reflecting blades. • Fixed radio links:   – Public safety radio systems work using microwave  wavelengths can be affected when the wind  turbine is placed within the line of sight between  the transponder and a receiver 
  10. 10. Cellular Phones• EM noise from turbines – insignificant – created is outside the cell phone band• Near field zone of transmitting and  receiving antennas is approx. 20 m.  – Objects within this zone can conduct or  absorb radio waves.• Diffraction: Partial or total blockage of  signal resulting in lower signal  strength.  – Problem when any object is within the first  Fresnel zone • Reflection: Caused when an object reflects  the waves.  – Less of a problem for blades made of glass  reinforced plastic and when the turbine is  separated from the tower by more than  325 ft.  
  11. 11. Existing Guidelines• Setback distances are  generally not provided• Some guidelines requires  interference to be  considered and minimized.

×