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Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
Dambach aisle changing whitepaper
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Dambach aisle changing whitepaper

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Comparision of fixed aisle vs. aisle changing s/r machine technology.

Comparision of fixed aisle vs. aisle changing s/r machine technology.

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  • 1. Solution ProfileAn Unbiased Comparison of Captive-Aisle & Aisle- Changing AS/RS Technologies
  • 2. DAMBACH Lagersysteme manufactures Automatic Storage /Retrieval Machines of all shapes, sizes, types, and performance– including “aisle-changing” and “aisle-bound”.Customer requirements will dictate the best technology andmaterial flow for the application.Aisle-changing Automated Storage and Retrieval Systems(AS/RS) involve the utilization of fewer Storage and RetrievalMachines (SRMs) than there are aisles of storage.The following factors are considered when planning any AS/RS,including both aisle-bound and aisle-changing:1. Throughput2. Inventory management3. Asset utilization4. Reactivity5. Investment6. System sizing7. Technical complexity8. Vulnerability9. Storage capacity1. ThroughputThroughput is a function of system layout and machineperformance. Aisle-changing systems (when changing at therear) work best when machines can perform multipletransactions before changing aisles (i.e. “wave based” systems).Aisle-changing machines have equal performance to aisle-bound machines in terms of speed, acceleration, andpositioning.Example calculation (loads in/out per machine): System 80ft tall x 300ft long. Pick-up / drop-off at front-end of system. Aisle change at rear (1) machine, (2) aisles. Single-deep. Both technologies capable of multiple-deep storage. For the aisle change machine it changes aisles every 10 double cycles. If aisle-bound then 34.7 combined cycles / hour / machine. If aisle-changing then 32.7 combined cycles / hour / machine. This means the aisle-changing machine sacrifices 5.7% in performance to change aisles.
  • 3. Aisle-bound systems generally tune machine performance tominimize the number of aisles, with limited ability increaseperformance in the future without expanding the completesystem.Aisle-changing systems performance can be increased withoutchanging the complete system (adding rack and building) bysimply adding additional machines.2. Inventory ManagementIncoming loads are balanced across all aisles in both aisle-changing and aisle-bound systems.Warehouse control software will dictate frequency of aisle-change to optimize material flow, shipping / receivingrequirements, and equipment utilization.Contrary to aisle-bound systems, any aisle-changing machinecan access any aisle. This means that even if a machine is outof service, 100% of storage locations are accessible by theremaining machines.3. Asset UtilizationAisle-changing systems can be single-ended or double-ended.It depends on the application.In many scenarios, the aisle-changing occurs at the front of thesystem. This has the advantage that only (1) set of input /output points is required for each machine (as opposed to eachaisle, for an aisle-bound system).For example, in a system with (2) machines in (6) aisles – theaisle-changing system can be designed with (2) pairs ofinputs/outputs as opposed to (6) pairs. Of course, there aremany other design possibilities. It depends on the application.As with aisle-bound systems, aisle-changing systems usually“velocity zone” the rack.4. ReactivityReactivity of the aisle-changing system depends on systemdesign. Particularly, whether the system uses front or rearaisle-changing.
  • 4. Using the previous application (80ft tall x 300ft long). In theaisle-bound system, the “average” single-cycle (hot pick) is 62.3seconds. In an aisle-changing system with rear-aisle change,where the machine is in the “wrong aisle” a single-cycle will take126.7 seconds.On the other hand – the system design should not be configuredaround a very small percentage of “hot picks”. If there are high-percentages of “hot picks” throughout the day, other factorsshould be considered in the design of your material handlingsystem.Periodic “hot picks” will not significantly affect total systemperformance.5. InvestmentTotal cost of ownership (and original capital cost) should beevaluated on a case-by-case basis for each customer. In manycases, choice of technology is “operationally based” or “materialflow” based. Capital cost is only one part of the equation.Each system is unique, but generally speaking an aisle-changing system requires fewer SRMs, thereby minimizingmaintenance and spare-parts requirements. Track switches arevery reliable and only require 15 minutes of preventativemaintenance 3x per year each aisle.Aisle-changing machines by DAMBACH Lagersysteme do notrequire batteries to change aisles. The machines are inconstant contact with 480VAC buss-bar.6. System SizingBoth aisle-changing and aisle-bound systems are sized for theapplication by adjusting design elements such as: machineperformance, rack length and height.Both aisle-changing and aisle-bound machines are capable ofthe same machine performance (speed / acceleration) in allaxis’. Both technologies are capable of single, double, triple-deep and deep-lane storage.Both technologies allow system heights in excess of 120ft. Infact, DAMBACH Lagersysteme built an aisle-changing machinein 1982 (27 years ago!) that was 117ft tall. We’ve been buildingaisle-changing machines that height and taller ever since.
  • 5. 7. Technical ComplexityAisle-changing machines have been used in the industry forover 30 years. They utilize time-proven designs, are reliableand easy to maintain.DAMBACH aisle-changing machines do not use batteries; nocontrols or electronics on upper guide rail (all “intelligence” atfloor level); “firmware” changes are automatic across allmachines simultaneously through the “Master Controller” in theevent of changes to the rack or system layout.Both aisle-changing and aisle-bound machines require similarpreventative maintenance and spare parts inventories.Maintenance hours and cost depends on number of machinesand aisles.8. VulnerabilityBoth aisle-changing and aisle-bound SRMs by DAMBACHLagersysteme provide an availability rating of 99%. However,with aisle-changing machines access to inventory is virtually100%.In an aisle-bound system, if the machine is out of service – theinventory in that aisle is completely unavailable. With an aisle-changing machine, the out of service machine can be moved toa maintenance area and the remaining machines can service allaisles.9. Storage Capacity / Building SizeAisle-changing machines require very compact run-outdimensions. For example:Aisle-bound machine with GMA pallet, 80ft tall: Front runout: 106” Rear runout: 204” Total runout (front + rear): 310”Aisle-changing machine with GMA pallet, 80ft tall: Front runout: 106” Rear aisle change (cross-aisle): 193” Total runout (front + rear aisle change): 299”The required building footprint with both technologies is verysimilar. All else is equal in terms of clearances, storage depths,heights, etc.
  • 6. Example System Designs Aisle Change at Back CRANE Aisle Change at Front CRANE Aisle-change at back increases throughput when machines stay in aisle for multiple cycles. Aisle changing at front minimizes front end conveyor complexity. Aisle changing at front allows additional storage for “staged” loads and “A” movers.For more information regarding DAMBACH Lagersysteme,call (616) 334-9969 or visit www.dambach-usa.com.
  • 7. Example System Designs Aisle Change at Back CRANE Aisle Change at Front CRANE Aisle-change at back increases throughput when machines stay in aisle for multiple cycles. Aisle changing at front minimizes front end conveyor complexity. Aisle changing at front allows additional storage for “staged” loads and “A” movers.For more information regarding DAMBACH Lagersysteme,call (616) 334-9969 or visit www.dambach-usa.com.
  • 8. Example System Designs Aisle Change at Back CRANE Aisle Change at Front CRANE Aisle-change at back increases throughput when machines stay in aisle for multiple cycles. Aisle changing at front minimizes front end conveyor complexity. Aisle changing at front allows additional storage for “staged” loads and “A” movers.For more information regarding DAMBACH Lagersysteme,call (616) 334-9969 or visit www.dambach-usa.com.
  • 9. Example System Designs Aisle Change at Back CRANE Aisle Change at Front CRANE Aisle-change at back increases throughput when machines stay in aisle for multiple cycles. Aisle changing at front minimizes front end conveyor complexity. Aisle changing at front allows additional storage for “staged” loads and “A” movers.For more information regarding DAMBACH Lagersysteme,call (616) 334-9969 or visit www.dambach-usa.com.

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