UM Sylvester Student Orientation Self-Study Packet
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UM Sylvester Student Orientation Self-Study Packet UM Sylvester Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Document Transcript

  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 1 of 21 Welcome to the UM Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center MISSION, VISION, 2 AND VALUES 2 A LONG AND PRESTIGIOUS HISTORY 3 OVERVIEW OF FACILITY SERVICES 4 NURSING RESPONSIBILITIES IN CLINCIAL AREAS 11 MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION 12 INCIDENT REPORTING 12 GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES 13 CODE RED (FIRE) 14 CODE YELLOW (BOMB THREAT) 17 CODES 18 CODES 18 CODES 18 DRESS CODE 23 PARKING 23 HOURS OF OPERATION 24 VISITING HOURS 25 BREAKS, TELEPHONE, AND SICK CALL 25 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 25
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 2 of 21 MISSION, VISION, AND VALUES MISSION We seek to reduce the human burden from cancer and other serious illnesses through research, education, prevention, and the delivery of quality patient care. VISION UM/Sylvester will become a fully integrated program of patient care, education, and research with an international reputation for excellence. UM/Sylvester will provide new hope for cancer patients in our extended community, which includes South Florida, the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and South America. UM/Sylvester will promote efficient, community responsive health care, and generate resources to sustain and enhance innovative cancer programs. VALUES Excellence – to go beyond the limits in accomplishments and expectations. Compassion – to work and care for the welfare of others, along with a desire to alleviate suffering. Respect – to recognize the worth, quality and importance of others. Discovery – to embrace the never-ending quest for new knowledge and awareness.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 3 of 21 A LONG AND PRESTIGIOUS HISTORY • First established in 1937.  National Children’s Cardiac Hospital (NCCH). • Present building occupied in 1963.  Continued as a Children’s Cardiac Hospital. • Obtained by the University of Miami in 1965  Integrates adult focused care. • In 1971, the building was enlarged and renamed University of Miami Hospital and Clinics. • In 1992, after a generous donation from the Sylvester family, the Sylvester Cancer Center was opened. • Today, it serves as the hub for cancer-related research, diagnosis, and treatment at the University Of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. Since opening 15 years ago, UM/Sylvester has transformed cancer research and treatment in South Florida and beyond. • UM/Sylvester handles nearly 1,600 inpatient admissions annually, 175,000 outpatient visits, performs 2,600 surgical procedures, and treats 3,400 new cancer patients. All UM/Sylvester physicians are on the faculty of the Miller School of Medicine, South Florida's only academic medical center.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 4 of 21 OVERVIEW OF FACILITY SERVICES • UM/Sylvester employs approximately 600 people – over a third of which are nursing professionals. • 3 Nursing Units have a capacity for patient overnight stays: 1. Inpatient Unit2nd floor UMHC building Carol James, RN Acting Manager:  Operates 24/7  Maximum capacity = 38 beds  Mainly cancer related treatment and post-operative patients 2. Comprehensive Treatment Unit (CTU) 2nd floor SCCC building Dianne McKenzie, RN, MSN, AOCN® Director:  Consists of 7 private 24-hour overnight stay rooms that operate 24/4  Consists of 22 cubicles for outpatient chemotherapy administration that operate Monday thru Friday
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 5 of 21 3. Perioperative Services2nd floor SCCC building Maria Cabrera, RN, BA, MA Director: Outpatient and complicated surgical procedures  Operates 24/6 – Scope of service includes:  4 cubicles in Holding Unit for preoperative preparation  3 cubicle Acute PACU (Recovery Room)  4 stepdown/24-hour stay beds in recovery room  6 recliner spaces as stepdown/predischarge area  5 active Operating Suites  Pain Management Services  Surgeries include:  Oncological Head & Neck Surgery, General Surgery (e.g. Mastectomies), Urological Procedures, Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery, and many more … • Outpatient Clinic Areas include: 1. OPD-1 Clinic 1st floor UMHC building Kimberly McDuffie, RN Acting Manager: Services include:  Arthritis Clinic  Nephrology  Endocrinology  Orthopedics  Hepatology  Pulmonology  Infectious Diseases  General Surgery  Internal Medicine  Vascular Surgery 2. Spine Institute 1st floor UMHC building Kimberly McDuffie, RN Acting Manager:
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 6 of 21 Services include:  Neurospinal Injury and Disease 3. Radiation Oncology Department Ground floor SCCC building (RadOnc) Cynthia Bradley, RN, BSN, OCN® Manager: Services include:  Clinic area for pre and post treatment assessments  Radiation therapy treatment suites 4. Hematology Oncology Clinic 2nd floor SCCC building (HemOnc) Lisette Zelaya, RN Manager: Services include:  Hematology Oncology  Medical Oncology  Bone Marrow Procedures 5. Gynecology Oncology Clinic Ground floor SCCC building (GYO) Lisette Zelaya, RN Manager: Services include:  Gynecology health assessments  Gynecologic oncology
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 7 of 21 6. Surgical Oncology Clinic (SurgOnc) 2nd floor SCCC building Joan Brewer, RN Manager: Services include:  Sinus & Voice Clinic  General/Surgical Oncology Physicians  Thoracic Surgery  Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery 7. Head and Neck Clinic 1st floor SCCC building Lisette Zelaya, RN Acting Manager: Services include:  Head and Neck Cancer Screening  Surgical Evaluation and Follow-Up 8. Mohs Clinic2nd floor UMHC (across from inpatient) building Maria Cabrera, RN, BA, MA Director: Dr. Mohs invented procedure Services include:  Cutaneous Surgery for Basal Cell, Squamous Cell Carcinomas Melanoma and other skin cancers 9. GI/Special Procedures 1st floor SCCC building Jean Tyson, RN Manager Special Procedures; Alex Medina, RN, BSN Acting Manager GI Procedures: Services include:  GI/Colorectal Clinic Area  GI Procedure Area (e.g. Colonoscopy, Sigmoidoscopy) 10. General Medicine Clinic 3rd floor UMHC building Carmen Enfante, RN, MSN Manager: Services include:
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 8 of 21  Treatment of various general/internal medicine illness (e.g. UTI’s, Back Pain, Hypertension) 11. Cardiology Clinic 3rd floor UMHC building Nicolle Doel, RN Acting Manager: Services include:  Pediatric & Adult Cardiac Assessment and Care 12. Cardiology Non Invasive Lab Clinic 3rd floor UMHC building Maria Cabrera, RN, BA, MA Director: Services include:  Pediatric & Adult Non-Invasive Diagnostics  Stress Testing  Tilt Table Testing – Syncope History  EKG  Dobutamine Stress Test  Stress Echocardiogram  Pacemaker Evaluation  Metabolic Stress Test • Ancillary Departments: 1. Radiology Services including 1st floor UMHC building:  Mammography, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc. 2. Interventional Radiology Services1st floor UMHC building:  Arteriogram  Venogram  Biliary Catheter Placement  Cardiac Catheterization  Port/Hickman Catheter Placement 3. Full Service Laboratory 2nd floor SCCC building:  Phlebotomy and Diagnostics 4. Respiratory Therapy/Pulmonary Lab2nd floor SCCC building:
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 9 of 21  Hospital wide Respiratory Care  Pulmonary Treatments (Pentamadine)  Pulmonary Function Testing 5. Patient relations 2nd floor SCCC building 6. Pharmacy 2nd floor SCCC building NURSING: KEY PERSONNEL Name Title Phone Number Anne Smith Chief Nursing Officer 305-243-4388 Elizabeth Smith Director of Nursing 305-243-4388 Director of Education Dianne McKenzie Director, Comprehensive 305-243-5234 Treatment Unit Maria Cabrera Director Per-Op Services 305-243-5210 Carol James Acting Manager Inpatient Unit 305-243-6894 Deborah O’Connor Director Ambulatory Services 305-325-4519 Tony Astles Staff Educator 305-243-9192 Eileen Butler Oncology Educator 305-243-9192 Margaret Suppa Administrative Assistant Clinical 305-243-4388
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 10 of 21 Nursing Services Brenda Lee Education Office Coordinator 305-243-9192 Maggie Kane Infection Control 305-325-5620
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 11 of 21 NURSING RESPONSIBILITIES IN CLINCIAL AREAS • Outpatient Clinics  New patient evaluation  Follow up patients post diagnostics/surgery  Duties similar to physician office  Nurses check in patients, take drug and allergy history as well as weight and vital signs; – record on Patient Discharge Form; Complete medication reconciliation form  Schedule diagnostics, such as lab, x-ray, mammography, etc.  Assist physicians with treatments and procedures  Schedule appointments for consults and return visits  Provide patient education for discharge • Over Night Stay Units: 24 hours  CTU – Perform infusion therapy, including blood products, chemotherapy, and various intravenous medication therapies – Also has an outpatient treatment area, Prived pateint education  PACU – Post surgical observation and critical monitoring • Inpatient Unit: Extended stay treatment and monitoring:  Post surgical care  Multiple dose chemotherapy infusions  Blood support – replacement therapy  Radiation therapy – radioactive implants  Tracheostomy care/ Ostomy care  Palliative and hospice care  Pain management  Patient education/Discharge planning
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 12 of 21  Documentation of nursing process on forms – Progress Notes, Graphic record, flow records, MAR MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION In orientation, you will review nursing medication administration medication policy #132 • Pyxis Medication Distribution System:  Stock medication appropriate to various patient care areas kept in Pyxis System  Includes stock Intravenous Solutions, all controlled drugs, and some intravenous, parenteral, and oral medications Note: NO Potassium or Dilantin is kept in Pyxis • Physician order medications:  Orders faxed to Pharmacy when received  Pharmacy fill immediate dose requirements  Pharmacy provides pre mixed bags of IV medication solutions  Medication carts with individual patient cassettes for prescribed medications not included in Pyxis profile • Prescription Medications:  We have a full service Outpatient Retail Pharmacy area 2ndl floor SCCC building INCIDENT REPORTING • Incident is an occurrence that has caused, or has the potential to cause, injury to a patient, employee, physician or visitor.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 13 of 21  For incidents involving a registered patient we record on the Patient Safety Report  For incidents involving any other person (not a registered patient) we record on the UM Injury/ Accident Report • For any reportable incident you MUST inform your preceptor and nursing instructor immediately:  You will be involved in completing the appropriate incident report  Never make mention of incident report in Nurse’s Notes on Patient’s Medical Record  Forward all incident reports to Risk Management A sentinel event occurs as a result of an unanticipated death or major permanent loss of function, not related to the expected course of the patient illness or underlying condition  Suicide of a patient in a setting where the patient receives around-the- clock care (e.g., hospital, residential nursing or treatment centers, crisis rehabilitation center)  Infant abduction or discharge to the wrong family  Rape  Hemolytic transfusion reaction involving administration of blood and blood products having major blood group incompatibilities  Surgery on the wrong patient or wrong body part  Within 24 hours of their occurrence the sentinel event needs to be reported to the Risk manager. GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES As part of minimizing or preventing potential safety hazards, the following guidelines are established: • Never block aisles or exits with boxes, chairs, stretchers, etc., even temporarily. • Positively NO RUNNING! Traffic passes to the right. • Approach corners and corridor intersections cautiously, using the overhead mirrors to avoid collisions.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 14 of 21 • Push vehicles, carts, stretchers, etc. SLOWLY. See your way ahead. • Push vehicles, carts, stretchers, etc. from the end (not the sides) to avoid smashing your fingers. Keep patient hands inside bed rails and wheelchairs. • Discard disposable items in the proper containers. • DO NOT eat or drink in the work area. • Wipe up spills immediately. • Observe NO SMOKING rules. Smoking is allowed in designated areas ONLY.  Sylvester courtyard area – the cubicles at the end of each side  UMHC area – outside in front of trailer • Be alert to potential safety hazards and report them to your instructor/preceptor. REMEMBER: It is everyone’s responsibility to maintain a safe work environment for our patients, visitors, and co-workers. Prevention and/or prompt recognition of potential safety hazards are key. When in doubt, check it out! Bring all identified potential safety hazards to the attention of your instructor/preceptor. In case of emergencies, take prompt action. Do not delay taking appropriate action. CODE RED (FIRE) • Treat all fire alarms as the ‘real thing’ until informed otherwise. NEVER BECOME COMPLACENT • When fire alarm sounds proceed to close all unit doors – reassure all patients that they are not in danger and will be attended to if necessary.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 15 of 21 •Do not leave your unit – report to your preceptor/instructor for further instructions. •Upon arrival to your assigned unit familiarize yourself to location of fire pull-stations and fire extinguishing equipment. • Ask your preceptor the correct evacuation route for patients and personnel, locate emergency exits, and ask about procedures used in that unit. • Know location of Oxygen Shut Off Valve. • If you discover a fire on your unit, we use the acronym: R – remove patients from danger A – activate pull station alarm and call 6-6000 C – confine fire by closing doors and windows E – extinguish or evacuate • We have ABC fire extinguishers for use on Electrical, Paper and Chemical fires. To use a fire extinguisher remember PASS: P - pull the pin A - aim at the base of the fire S - squeeze the trigger S - sweep from side to side
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 16 of 21 • If fire is small and confined to a small area:  Fight it!  Always leave yourself an exit!  Stay calm – Don’t panic CODE BLUE (CARDIOPULMONARY ARREST) • Nursing Services Policy and Procedure Manual, Inpatient • Section, Policy #110 “CODE BLUE” •Code Blue Procedure:  Establish unresponsiveness.  Call out for help – “Code Blue” and location  Initiate BLS protocols as per AHA/BLS.  Activate Code Blue system by: a. Dial 6-6565 (code blue phone will ring in Inpatient Nurses’ Station). b. State “Code Blue” give location of arrest (indicate unit/area room number and floor). If it is a pediatric arrest, it should be indicated at this time.  Crash Cart/Defibrillator will be delivered to scene.  Code Team to arrive within 3-5 minutes.
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 17 of 21 AEDs located #1 entrance UMHC building 1 floor by st security desk and #2 main information desk SCCC building ground floor by radiation oncology  Students to observe and help only as directed by preceptor and nursing instructor. CODE YELLOW (BOMB THREAT) •Bomb threat called in… Refer to Quick Guide Bomb Threat Checklist On Inside Cover • Notify your preceptor immediately!
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 18 of 21 CODES AND OTHER SAFETY REMINDERS REFER TO ORANGE QUICK REFERENCE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROCEDURE BOOK PROCEDURE DEFINITION Dial 6-6000 to notify Security and report situation Code Yellow Bomb Threat Dial 6-6565 and announce Code Blue Code Blue Cardiopulmonary Arrest Notify Administrator or designee who will then notify Code D Internal Disaster security to activate procedure Code Red Dial 6-6000 to notify Security and report situation Fire NEUTROPENIC PRECAUTIONS Nursing Policy #185 Neutropenia is the single most important Infections that develop in a patient who is neutropenic can be life factor associated with infection in threatening immunocompromised patient Neutropenia is defined as Less than 1000cells/mm3 circulating neutrophils. Normal counts range from 2500 to 6000cells/mm3 ANC = absolute neutrophil count important determining patients risk for infections The most important thing you can do to WASH YOUR HANDS! prevent most infections: Use of Alcohol based products in between Helps prevent the spread of disease and infection patients care and washing hands with soap/water: All IV sites and central venous catheters Adherence to policies for aseptic technique for CVC care and peripheral site and tube changes per policy Insertion medication No rectal temperature taken nor any suppositories or enemas to be administered to these patients Temperature equal to above 100.5°F; vitals Fever may be the only sign of infection signs at least every four hours System assessment every shift Protective isolation In hospital when neutrophil count less an 1000cell/mm3 patient placed in private room, no fresh cut flowers, no visitors or staff to care for patient with transmittable diseases Patient and family education Essential for most patients experience neutropenia while at home
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 19 of 21 Infection Control INFECTION CONTROL Nursing Policy #162 A thorough infection control program can: Help shorten the patient’s stay/decrease hospital cost Decrease nosocomial infections Standard precautions means: Wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The most important thing you can do to WASH YOUR HANDS! prevent most infections: Use of Alcohol based products in between Helps prevent the spread of disease and infection patients care and washing hands with soap/water: Remove all personal protective equipment THIS IS A MUST! (PPE) before leaving a patient care area: You must consider that all patients may carry KEEP THIS IN MIND AT ALL TIMES! HIV or Hepatitis B infection: Other important Key Points: It is not acceptable to eat/drink in the work area You must wear eye protection/mask if splashing or spraying of body fluid is anticipated. If you come in contact with blood or other body fluids, you should wash your skin immediately. You must clean equipment and work surfaces at the end of your shift or when they are visibly contaminated? DO NOT recap needles. List of Disposal Containers: • CLEAR plastic bag – paper, cups, etc. • RED plastic bag – biohazard waste, any material saturated with blood • Puncture resistant container – needle/sharps Transmission-based precautions: • Droplet - transmitted by large particle droplets containing microorganism. Droplets can be generated from coughing, sneezing, talking, during suctioning or bronchoscopy. (ex: meningitis, pneumonia, mumps, rubella) Precaution: Gloves, gown, surgical mask, protective eyewear, private room • Airborne = transmitted by airborne droplet nuclei. (ex: measles, chickenpox, tuberculosis) Precaution: N95 particulate respirator mask, gloves, private room with negative pressure. Care giver & visitors must have immunity Pt’s room door must remain closed • Contact - transmitted by direct patient contact or by contact with items in the patient’s environment. (ex: VRE, MRSA, scabies, conjunctivitis) Precaution: Gloves, gown, strict handwashing
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 20 of 21 PAIN MANAGEMENT Nursing Policy #190 1. An assessment of Pain will be completed at Document on designated form for pain assessment. beginning of each clinic visit, for each pre and post procedure and upon admission. 2. An ongoing assessment of pain and management Standardized Pain Scale from 1 to 10. Document on Pain will continue throughout the patient’s hospital stay Assessment Tool following this format: Pain is whatever the perceiver states it is. 3. Patients response to pain following intervention Refer to specified guidelines on Pain Assessment Tool, based must be documented as follows: upon route of administration. Time frame for reassessment of pain is based on the intervention. PATIENT SAFETY/FALL RISK Administrative Policy #285 1. Nursing staff will assess the patient for safety/fall Place patient at risk for falls on Fall precautions. Place a risk at the time of admission, Purple armband. every shift and as change in condition: 1. The following reporting system is used for all Patient Safety Report. patient falls: PATIENT SAFETY ALERT ARMBANDS Patient safety alert armbands: White In-patient ID band YELLOW ALLERGY Red RED Rr BLOOD Purple FALL IV THERAPY 1.Periopheral IV SITE CARE /SITE Q96 hours and PRN. CHANGE per policy is: 2.Central venous catheter Port change needle every 7 days Occlusive dressing change every 7 days Gauze dressing change every other day 3. IV tubing change per policy is: IV tubing Q 72 hrs, TPN/Lipids is 24 hours 4. IV fluids are documented as follows: Signed off on MAR, any IV flow sheets,
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 21 of 21
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 22 of 21 RESTRAINTS Administrative Policy #143 It is the policy of the university of Miami Hospital and Clinics and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer center to decrease restraint use through effective, preventative strategies or use of innovative alternative measures. If alternative measures are ineffective, the less restrictive method of restrain impossible is used and applied and removed by qualified staff. The restraint must be discontinued at the earliest possible time. All patients have the right to the safe implementation of restraint by trained personnel. Patient population (s) or risk factors of Patients who are confused, disoriented, have an unsteady gait and those prone to the use of restraints: are prone to wandering with a risk for injury, pose a danger to self or others, and which have not responded to alternatives attempted. Alternatives must be attempted prior to  Quiet area  Nutrition/hygiene  Change area restraint use  Diversional activity  Bed alarm  Reassurance  Family interaction  Pain management  Commode  Orientation  Reposition  Medications  Close to nursing station  Sitter  Music/TV Criteria for the use of restraints:  Non-behavioral reasons – patient is unable to follow directions to refrain actions that can injure self, impulsivedisconnecting/removing therapeutic devices, medically unsafe attempts at mobility  Behavioral reasons – Combative, danger to self and others Monitoring/Documentation The following will be assessed, monitored and documented:  Alternatives attempted  Behavior  Respiratory status  Compromised circulation  Restraint device  Vital signs (BP, HR, RR)  Removal and reapplication appropriately to provide care  Whether less restrictive methods of restraint are possible  Patient rights, dignity maintained  Hydration and nutrition needs  Elimination and hygiene needs  Skin integrity  Skin care and repositioning  Signs of injury  Range of motion/Exercise of limbs
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 23 of 21 DRESS CODE • Uniform as per School’s policy:  Uniforms must be neat, clean, and wrinkle-free. • Hair must be clean and neat. It should be confined up and off shoulders. • Nails must be clean and trimmed.  No artificial nails permitted.  Nail polish, if worn, must be conservative and remain intact without chipping, no appliqué, or peeling. • Jewelry that does not create a safety hazard may be worn.  No dangling earrings.  Watch with a second hand is a required part of the complete uniform.  Dangling or bangle bracelets are not permitted. • Hosiery must cover all exposed areas of the legs. No socks or knee-highs with skirts or dresses. • Shoes must be clean.  No sandals or canvas shoes. • ID badge must be worn at all times in a visibly acceptable area. PARKING • Students may park in any of parking garages on UM medical campus. Sylvester parking requires valet charge of $20.00. BREAKS • You may take breaks as per your instructor’s approval • Please notify your preceptor that you will be taking a break
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 24 of 21 SICK CALL • Notify your individual instructor HOURS OF OPERATION Cardiology Clinic.................................................8:00a.m.-6:00p.m. Cardiology Lab....................................................8:00a.m.-6:00p.m. Nursing Administration.......................................8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. CTU (Mon., Tues., Thurs.)..................................24 hours (Wed &Fri.)................................................7:00a.m.-7:30p.m. Cafeteria..............................................................7:15a.m.-9:00p.m. Employee Health.................................................7:30a.m.-4:00p.m. General Medicine.................................................8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. GYO....................................................................8:00a.m.-4:30p.m. Head & Neck Clinic.............................................8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. HemOnc...............................................................8:00a.m.-4:30p.m. Infection Control..................................................8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Inpatient...............................................................24 hours Laboratory...........................................................24 hours Medical Records..................................................7:00a.m.-11:30p.m. OPD-1..................................................................8:00a.m.-9:30p.m. Periop Services....................................................24 hours (Except Sat/Sun) GI................................................................8:00a.m.-5:30p.m. Special Procedures......................................7:30a.m.-5:00p.m. Mohs Clinic.................................................8:30a.m.-5:00p.m. Pharmacy Inpatient.......................................................24 hours Observation & Surgical...............................24 hours Outpatient Clinics........................................8:00a.m.-5:30p.m. Take Home Prescriptions............................9:00a.m.-5:00p.m. RadOnc................................................................8:00a.m.-5:30p.m. Radiology............................................................6:30a.m.-8:00p.m. Respiratory Therapy............................................6:30a.m.-11:00p.m. Risk Management................................................24 hours
  • Student Orientation Self-Study Packet Page 25 of 21 SurgOnc Clinic....................................................8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. Transportation......................................................24 hours VISITING HOURS • Inpatient Nursing Units: 11:00am–9:00pm BREAKS, TELEPHONE, AND SICK CALL TELEPHONE • For an outside line, dial 9 + 305 + phone number • To dial in-house, dial 6 + extension ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS • A computer based learning module program in, ULearn, will be assigned to you for your review and completion. You will receive instructions in orientation as to how to access this system. It requires a login with sign in which will be your C Number and password. Each student must read the material in the modules, complete the testing for each module and present the certificate of completion prior to beginning your clinical rotation on the unit. Failure to complete this process will result in your inability to begin clinical rotation on the units at UMSylvester