Developed By: Barbara (Bobbi) Clarke, PhD,RD
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Developed By: Barbara (Bobbi) Clarke, PhD,RD

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  • Note to Presenter: This is the third section of the “Protect Your Family’s Health with Immunizations” PowerPoint presentation series. Role of Immunizations in Protecting Your Health and Your Child’s Health (General Information) Immunizations for Children and Teens Immunizations for Adults Get the Flu Shot… NOT the Flu! August is National Immunization Awareness month, sponsored by National Partners for Immunizations (NIAM). Consider offering this presentation to your clientele to increase awareness about immunizations across the life span as parents and children prepare to return to school and the health community begins preparations for the up coming flu season. To obtain a free copy of the NIAM Promotional kit or download the materials, visit their web site: http://www.partnersforimmunization.org/niam_prkit.html This kit provides community educators with suggested activities, recommendations and immunization information involving parents/caregivers, public health professionals, employers, and health care providers. Refer to the National Extension Website on Immunizations for additional information on immunizations including updates on bioterrorism. Note to Instructor: Distribute a copy of the Centers for Disease Control’s brochure, An Adult Immunizations , which summarizes the need for vaccines in adulthood and which vaccines adults should receive. The website address is http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/default.htm
  • Just like kids, adults need immunizations too. Many adults become ill, are disabled, and even die each year from diseases that could easily be prevented by vaccines. Note to Presenter: Distribute a copy of the Adult Immunization brochure from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Immunization Program (NIP) website: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/default.htm This brochure summarizes the need for vaccines in adulthood and which vaccines adults should receive. This address takes you directly to the PDF color brochure: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/brochures/adult_immz_engl_print.pdf
  • Note to Presenter: Find out if pharmacists in your state are certified to administer these vaccines.
  • You need to check with your health insurance company to find out if these vaccines are covered by your insurance.
  • It is difficult to remember when a person has had a certain immunization. For example, if you had gotten a deep puncture wound while working in the yard, you could be susceptible to infection from tetanus. Your doctor would want to know when was the last time you had a tetanus shot. Could you tell him/her? So keep a record with the date and the type of vaccine given to each adult member of your family. This will prevent needless revaccination during a health emergency or when you change health care providers (doctors). Helpful to bring a copy of your immunizations record when having your annual physical. Note to Presenter: Hand copies of the Immunization Record for Adults available at http://fcs.tamu.edu/health/health_record/adult2.htm This immunization record is also located on page 6 of the Texas Cooperative Extension Family Health and Medical Record packet: http://fcs.tamu.edu/health/health_record/b1377.pdf
  • The flu shot has limited immunity protection which is why you must get the this vaccine once a year. Flu (influenza) is a highly contagious virus. An annual flu shot in the fall protects you against the flu. You can get the flu shot at a variety of places in addition to your doctor’s office. Can you name some of these places? (Answers include: pharmacies, businesses, health departments, clinics, health fairs, senior centers.) Watch for promotional ads in your newspaper.
  • The Diphtheria vaccine has limited immunity protection which is why you must get this vaccine every ten years. Diphtheria is a serious infection of the throat, mouth and nose which lead to suffocation, pneumonia, heart failure, and paralysis. It is spread by coughing and sneezing.
  • The Tetanus vaccine has limited immunity protection which is why you must get this vaccine every ten years. Tetanus is a disease of the nervous system causing muscle spasms of the jaw (lockjaw), stiffness of the neck and stomach, and difficulty swallowing. Death occurs in one-third of the people infected, especially individuals over 50 years of age. Tetanus is a bacteria that enters the body through a cut in the skin.
  • Pneumonia and influenza combined rank as the sixth leading causes of death. These are very serious diseases especially among the elderly, because their immune systems are weakened by age and other chronic conditions. Pneumonia is a serious infection of the lungs. The air sacs of the lungs fill with pus and other liquid. Oxygen has trouble reaching your blood. If there is too little oxygen in your blood, your body cells can not work properly. Because of this and the spreading infection through the body, pneumonia can cause death. Because pneumonia is a common complication of the flu, getting a flu shot every fall is how you avoid getting pneumonia. In addition to the flu shot, persons 65 years of age and older should also get the pneumococcal vaccine. This vaccine is usually only given once. Seniors can get this shot when they get their flu shot. Other people at greatest risk for getting bacterial pneumonia are those who: Have chronic illnesses such as asthma or other lung diseases, heart disease, kidney disorders, sickle cell anemia, or diabetes. Are recovering from severe illness Are in nursing homes or other chronic care facilities
  • Hepatitis refers to diseases of the liver. The most common means of contracting Hepatitis A infection is by swallowing food or water that contains the virus. Other means of spreading Hepatitis A is by household contact among families or roommates, sexual contact, or inoculation from persons sharing illicit drugs. Children often have unrecognized infections and can pass the virus through ordinary play, unknown to parents, who may later become infected from contact with their children. Ask your doctor if you need this vaccine. There may be other vaccines you may need as well. Note to Presenter: Hepatitis A virus is a common cause of inflammation of the liver. In many parts of the world, hepatitis A is so common that almost every adult has been infected at some point in his or her life. There are certain areas in the United States with higher than average rates of hepatitis A disease. The hepatitis A vaccine currently is recommended for persons in the following states where the prevalence of hepatitis A is greater than twice the national average: Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah and Washington. Routine vaccination also can be considered in six states where the prevalence of hepatitis A is less than twice but greater than the national average: Arkansas, Colorado, Texas, Missouri, Montana and Wyoming. Hepatitis A vaccine is recommended for anyone traveling to countries where the disease is highly prevalent. This includes all countries other than Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Scandinavia and those in Western Europe. Persons with chronic liver disease or blood-clotting disorders should receive the hepatitis A vaccine.
  • This virus leads to acute and chronic liver disease as well as liver cancer. Hepatitis B is spread through contact with blood of an infected person or by having sex with an infected person. High risk people such as health care workers, kidney dialysis patients, overseas travelers, sexual partners of hepatitis B carriers, people with multiple sex partners, and/or users of IV drugs should get the this vaccine. Ask your doctor if you need this vaccine. There may be other vaccines you may need as well.
  • You may want to complete this form to help you self-screen which vaccines you need. Note to Presenter: Distribute copies of the Adult Vaccination Screening Form to participants: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/recs/adult-schedule.htm or use the direct link to the PDF form: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/recs/adult_vac_scrn_gen.pdf
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention maintains a Web site for people who are planning to travel outside the United States. This site gives you information on immunizations and other health precautions that may be needed for travel to other countries.
  • Pregnant women should consult with their doctor who will consider a vaccination on the basis of risks versus benefits for the individual and her pregnancy – what is safe or unsafe for the mother and the baby.

Developed By: Barbara (Bobbi) Clarke, PhD,RD Developed By: Barbara (Bobbi) Clarke, PhD,RD Presentation Transcript

  • Developed By: Barbara (Bobbi) Clarke, PhD,RD Professor, Extension Health Specialist and Co-director for The University of Tennessee Center for Community-based Health Initiatives Protect Your Family’s Health With Immunizations Immunizations for Adults ~ Updated 12/03 ~
  • Immunizations are NOT just for kids!
  • Where Do You Get These Immunizations?
    • Doctor’s office
    • Health Department
    • Pharmacies (Flu and Pneumococcal shots)
    • Local hospitals or clinics
    • Health fairs
  • What do These Shots Cost?
    • Costs vary depending on your insurance coverage
    • Medicare Part B pays for flu and pneumonia shots
  • Keep Records of Immunizations
    • Keep an immunization record for each adult member of your family
    • Ask your doctor for a record to use
    • Keep these important records in a place where you can easily find them
  • Adult Immunizations Record
  • Vital Vaccines for Adults
    • Flu shot – Protects against the influenza virus (the flu)
      • Especially important for adults age 50 and older, pregnant women and adults with chronic diseases
      • Get the flu shot every year in the fall
  • Vital Vaccines for Adults
    • Diphtheria – Protects against diphtheria (severe infection of the throat and respiratory tract)
      • Get the diphtheria vaccine every 10 years
    (continued)
  • Vital Vaccines for Adults
    • Tetanus vaccine – Protects against tetanus (a serious neurological disorder that may occur from a contaminated wound, also called lockjaw)
      • Get the tetanus vaccine every 10 years
    (continued)
  • Vital Vaccines for Some Adults
    • Pneumococcal vaccine – Protects against bacterial pneumococcal (a serious infection of the lungs)
      • High risk people who should get the pneumococcal vaccine: those who are age 65 or older , have chronic illnesses (such as lung diseases, heart disease, kidney disorders, sickle cell anemia, or diabetes), are recovering from severe illness , or are in nursing homes or other chronic-care facilities
      • You can get the pneumococcal vaccine when you get the flu shot
      • Getting the flu shot may prevent pneumonia because this infection is a common complication of the flu
  • Vital Vaccines for Some Adults
    • Hep A – Protects against Hepatitis A (liver infection)
      • Recommended for anyone traveling to countries where the disease is highly prevalent
      • Highly recommended for persons with chronic liver disease or blood-clotting disorders
    (continued)
  • Vital Vaccines for Some Adults
    • Hep B – Protects against Hepatitis B (liver infection)
      • High risk people that should get the Hep B vaccine: health care workers, kidney dialysis patients, overseas travelers, sexual partners of hepatitis B carriers, people with multiple sex partners, or users of IV drugs
    (continued)
  •  
  • Immunizations for International Travelers
    • Check with your doctor about necessary vaccines
      • Need to get them in advance before the trip in order to build-up immunity against the disease
    • View the CDC’s Travelers Health Web site for more information about vaccinations before traveling to a foreign country: http://www.cdc.gov/travel
  • Should Pregnant Women Get Immunizations?
    • Women that are pregnant should talk with their doctor about their individual level of risk for vaccine-preventable diseases.
    • The flu shot is recommended for women who will be beyond the first trimester of pregnancy during the influenza season.
    • Women with medical conditions that increase their risk for complications of the flu should be vaccinated.
    • Questions?