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The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
The importance of reading
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The importance of reading

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Audience: parents …

Audience: parents
objective :stimulate parents involvement
where :parents meeting at school

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Independent READING AND INDEPENDENT READING AND SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT<br />
  • 2. What is independent reading?<br />Reading students choose to do on their own<br />Reader personal choice of material to be read<br />Reader personal place and time to read<br />Voluntary reading<br />
  • 3. Why is it important?<br />This affirms the predictability of a success cycle: we become more proficient at what we practice. (Cullinam 1992)<br />Reading achievement correlate with success in school and the amount of independent reading they do(Greaney 1980;Anderson,Fielding and wilson 1988)<br />
  • 4. EFFECTS OF READING ON LEARNERS<br />Children who learn to read before school entrance are those who are read to, who have someone to answer their question.(1% of the population)(Durkin 1986)<br />Proficient middle-grade readers spend more time doing recreational reading.(Watkins and Edwards,1992)<br />Age level shapes why people read, what they read, how much they read, and what they do with what they read.<br />
  • 5. Promote independent readingfor preschool and kindergarten<br />Story hours<br />Parents and child programs<br />Public library reading program<br />Book related activity<br />
  • 6. Promote independent readingfor Primary and Elementary<br />Parents and children read together from brief, highly predictable text and engaged in language development activities such as sentence-building activities. (Rasinski 1994)<br />Tutoring program involving cooperative learning, early reading instruction, writing, and family support in inner city schools. (Ross and Smith 1994)<br />Parents and children visit the library as often as they visit the playground. <br />
  • 7. Promote independent readingfor middle school and young adults<br />Create discussion groups organized around books children choose to read.(Morris and Kaplan, 1994)<br />Sustained silent reading program at school.(Ozburn,1995)<br />Provide media resources and up to date collections.<br />
  • 8. Conclusion<br />Effective programs designed to promote reading in schools, homes, and libraries include access to varied material that appeal to all ages and tastes, active parent involvement, partnerships among community institutions, and collaboration among significant adults in students’ lives.<br />

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