Advancing Cloud Initiatives and Removing Barriers to Adoption

817 views
713 views

Published on

RightScale User Conference NYC 2011 -

Michael Crandell - CEO, RightScale
Brian Adler - Solutions Architect, RightScale

Cloud misconceptions and corporate inertia often surface as the greatest inhibitors of enterprise cloud adoption. In this session, we'll share successful enterprise use cases and give you practical tips on addressing legitimate concerns to accelerate cloud adoption within your organization. We'll discuss specific issues that enterprises often encounter when using cloud-based resource pools, such as managing security, visibility, and control through infrastructure audits.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
817
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Early AdoptersThey “buy into new product concepts very early in their life cycle, but unlike innovators, they are not technologists. Rather they are people who find it easy to imagine, understand, and appreciate the benefits of a new technology, and to relate these potential benefits to their other concerns. Because they rely on their own intuition and vision, they are key to opening up any high-tech market segment.”Change Agent “What the early adopter is buying [is a] change agent. By being the first to implement this change in their industry, the early adopters expect to get a jump on the competition… They are also prepared to bear with the inevitable bugs and glitches.”Early MajorityThey “share some of the early adopter’s ability to relate to technology, but ultimately they are driven by a strong sense of practicality. … They want to see well-established references before investing substantially. Because there are so many people in this segment—roughly one-third of the whole adoption life cycle—winning their business is key to any substantial profits and growth.”Productivity Improvement “By contrast, the early majority want to buy a productivity improvement for existing operations. … They want technology to enhance, not overthrow, the established ways of doing business.” And “they do not want to debug somebody else’s product.”
  • Early AdoptersThey “buy into new product concepts very early in their life cycle, but unlike innovators, they are not technologists. Rather they are people who find it easy to imagine, understand, and appreciate the benefits of a new technology, and to relate these potential benefits to their other concerns. Because they rely on their own intuition and vision, they are key to opening up any high-tech market segment.”Change Agent “What the early adopter is buying [is a] change agent. By being the first to implement this change in their industry, the early adopters expect to get a jump on the competition… They are also prepared to bear with the inevitable bugs and glitches.”Early MajorityThey “share some of the early adopter’s ability to relate to technology, but ultimately they are driven by a strong sense of practicality. … They want to see well-established references before investing substantially. Because there are so many people in this segment—roughly one-third of the whole adoption life cycle—winning their business is key to any substantial profits and growth.”Productivity Improvement “By contrast, the early majority want to buy a productivity improvement for existing operations. … They want technology to enhance, not overthrow, the established ways of doing business.” And “they do not want to debug somebody else’s product.”
  • Advancing Cloud Initiatives and Removing Barriers to Adoption

    1. 1. Advancing Cloud Initiatives and Removing Barriers to Adoption<br />Michael Crandell - CEO, RightScale<br />Brian Adler - Sr. Professional Services Architect, RightScale<br />June 8th, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Agenda<br />State of the Cloud in the Enterprise<br />Perceived Barriers to Adoption<br />Enterprise Use Cases<br />Pragmatic Path to Cloud Adoption<br />
    3. 3. Similar to the electrical grid, compute resources are becoming a commodity<br />Beginning of Tidal Shift<br />
    4. 4. Global Market<br />
    5. 5. New Reality<br />
    6. 6. Servicing 100,000,000+ users daily<br />RightScale platform usage 285% Year-Over-Year growth<br />Operating at Web Scale<br />
    7. 7. RightScale in Enterprise<br />
    8. 8. Agenda<br />State of the Cloud in the Enterprise<br />Perceived Barriers to Adoption<br />Enterprise Use Cases<br />Pragmatic Path to Cloud Adoption<br />
    9. 9. Who’s Driving Cloud Initiatives<br />
    10. 10. The VP of NO<br />
    11. 11. Challenges & Blockers<br />
    12. 12. Challenges & Blockers<br /> Security Reliability Lock-in<br />
    13. 13. Security<br /><ul><li>Myth: “The Cloud is not secure”
    14. 14. Reality: Multi-tiered approach required
    15. 15. Distinguish between
    16. 16. Security, compliance & trust
    17. 17. Security is shared responsibility
    18. 18. Certifications increase all the time
    19. 19. SAS 70 Type 2
    20. 20. PCI DSS
    21. 21. ISO 27001
    22. 22. FISMA Low
    23. 23. HIPAA solutions
    24. 24. Private cloud is a new answer
    25. 25. Security team at RightScale</li></li></ul><li>Reliability<br /><ul><li>Myth: “The Cloud is not reliable”
    26. 26. Reality: Everything fails
    27. 27. Operational excellence at scale is impressive
    28. 28. Compare to most enterprise data centers
    29. 29. But public cloud failures can be big
    30. 30. Business continuity = redundancy & failover
    31. 31. How much do you want to spend?
    32. 32. With multiple cloud options, costs are lower than ever!
    33. 33. Comes down to design, automation, management</li></li></ul><li>Lock-In<br /><ul><li>Myth: “The Cloud locks you in”
    34. 34. Reality: It’s up to you
    35. 35. Data has mass
    36. 36. Vendor contracts
    37. 37. Vendor features & APIs
    38. 38. What you can do
    39. 39. Preserve multiple choices for any service
    40. 40. Keep contracts to length you can predict
    41. 41. Avoid unique services & APIs
    42. 42. Anticipate moving – set up small footprints elsewhere
    43. 43. Pilot a private cloud
    44. 44. Design for portability: architecture choices matter</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br />State of the Cloud in the Enterprise<br />Perceived Barriers to Adoption<br />Enterprise Use Cases<br />Pragmatic Path to Cloud Adoption<br />
    45. 45. Enterprise Manager<br /><ul><li>Provides visibility and control of projects across the organization
    46. 46. Multiple accounts under the “umbrella” of the Enterprise account
    47. 47. Account groups, active servers, run-rate predictions, quotas, etc.
    48. 48. User information
    49. 49. All users within the Enterprise
    50. 50. Individual account memberships and permissions
    51. 51. Last access information
    52. 52. Audit entries of actions performed</li></li></ul><li>Enterprise Manager – Accounts<br />
    53. 53. Enterprise Manager – Users<br />
    54. 54. Infrastructure Audit<br /><ul><li>Review of all Security Groups or SSH Keys
    55. 55. Includes audit of all Regions
    56. 56. Security Group audit analyzes public ports, or all ports
    57. 57. SSH Key audit analyzes running servers, or all servers
    58. 58. Up to 10 audits can be stored, with one being marked as a baseline for comparison
    59. 59. Audits can be downloaded as text or JSON files</li></li></ul><li>Infrastructure Audit<br />
    60. 60. Infrastructure Audit – Security Groups<br />
    61. 61. Infrastructure Audit – SSH Keys<br />
    62. 62. Self-Service IT Portal<br />Goals<br />Self-service access … <br />… to multiple application stacks<br />… on multiple IT resource pools<br />Requirements<br />Use only compliant and certified builds<br />Access selected resource pools based on role & group membership<br />Consumption metering and tracking<br />Easily share best practices<br />
    63. 63. Self-Service IT Portal<br />
    64. 64. Dev & Test<br /><ul><li>Lifecycle Challenges</li></ul>Limited, shared resources<br />Lead time for procuring and provisioning equipment<br />Maintaining consistent environments throughout the lifecycle<br />Maintaining multiple environments in parallel<br />Distributed teams and team members<br />
    65. 65. Dev & Test<br />Available, Easily Provisioned Resources <br />
    66. 66. Batch Processing / Grid Computing<br />Challenges<br />For IT<br />High capital investment, typically low capacity utilization<br />Scheduling conflicts, constant provisioning<br />Specialized architectural and operational skills<br />Specialized software applications and unique datasets<br />For End Users<br />Wait for resources<br />Limited to resources available in the datacenter <br />
    67. 67. Grid Computing in the Cloud<br />Grid Computing in the Cloud<br />Cloud Computing Model<br />Resolves Scheduling Issues<br />Resources on Demand<br />Virtually Infinite Resources<br />Supports Faster Processing<br />Matches Costs to Demand <br />Pay as You Go <br />
    68. 68. Cloud-based Grid Computing Use Cases<br />Pharmaceutical Analysis – Researchers expected a protein analysis comparing 2.5 million compounds to take a week of processing on internal servers <br /> • Using hundreds of servers, the job was completed in one day<br />Insurance Claims Loss Control – Systems for detecting fraudulent, improper or duplicate claims in batches of millions of claims would have required months of processing time to run and millions of dollars in capital outlay to build in the data center <br /> • Batch runs finished in a few days at significantly lower cost <br />Web 2.0 – One customer transcodes images to render video on demand <br /> • Processing time was reduced from hours on internal resources to minutes<br />Financial Data Processing –Back testing environments that analyze data to test new trading strategies • Trading strategies analyzed faster and more cost-effectively by scaling out servers<br />
    69. 69. Scalable Web Applications<br />
    70. 70. Scalable Web Applications<br /><ul><li>Add capacity as demand dictates
    71. 71. Classic example of “pay as you go” utility computing
    72. 72. Enables the ability to react to viral and flash-crowd events without degradation of service
    73. 73. PaaS solutions exist that can leverage scalability benefits
    74. 74. Zend Solution Pack
    75. 75. VMware’s Cloud Foundry
    76. 76. Hybrid cloud environments can scale to take advantage of both public and private clouds
    77. 77. Zynga’s Z Cloud is currently the largest hybrid cloud in the world, all of which is managed through the RightScale platform</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br />State of the Cloud in the Enterprise<br />Perceived Barriers to Adoption<br />Enterprise Use Cases<br />Pragmatic Path to Cloud Adoption<br />
    78. 78. The VP of GO<br />
    79. 79. Start with Visibility<br />Inventory existing IaaS cloud usage<br />Get cloud accounts under unified management<br />Establish internal standards and processes for governance<br />Understand opportunities<br />Articulate needs & solutions<br />Demonstrate a solution<br />Education<br />References<br />Demo<br />Propose a project<br />
    80. 80. Leverage Available Accelerators<br /><ul><li>Documentation
    81. 81. Online documentation/video tutorials (support.rightscale.com)
    82. 82. Support
    83. 83. Technical Support
    84. 84. Education Services
    85. 85. JumpStart Training
    86. 86. Instructor-Led Training (ILT)
    87. 87. Professional Services
    88. 88. Virtual Onsites
    89. 89. Premium Onboarding
    90. 90. Deployment Reviews
    91. 91. Deployment Build-out / Custom ServerTemplate Development
    92. 92. High Availability (HA) Assessments</li></li></ul><li>
    93. 93. RightScale Resource Pools<br />Requirements Filter<br />Application Portfolio<br />Public Clouds<br />Performance<br />App 1<br />App 1<br />Private Clouds<br />Cost<br />App 2<br />App 2<br />AWS VPC<br />Security<br />App N<br />Compliance<br />App N<br />Resource Pools<br />Reliability<br />Data Center<br />Colocation<br />Assess Applications for Fit<br />
    94. 94. Demo<br />Create a demo<br />Address a specific problem or opportunity<br />Example:<br />Live demo to access a pre-configured deployment (in this case, the IBM middleware stack), make a modification and launch<br />You are demonstrating control, agility and rapid provisioning<br />Chins from the IBMers were on the floor when they saw a full IBM middleware stack provisioned in 6 minutes <br />Call us if you’d like help<br />
    95. 95. Propose a Project<br />Not an all-or-nothing, either/or discussion<br />Any given project may or may not be suited for cloud<br />10+ reasons to use cloud / 10+ reasons not to<br />Don't boil the ocean – go for low-hanging fruit<br />Use small, well-defined projects to kick off a POC<br />Once first application is operational, expand from there<br />Take advantage of “VIP accounts”<br />Cloud-ready Solution Packs<br />Develop & Test, ScalableWebsite<br />Grid, Gaming Editions<br />
    96. 96. Reference Customers<br />
    97. 97. Key Takeaways<br /><ul><li>Dynamic runtime configuration with control
    98. 98. Automation
    99. 99. Failure resilient designs
    100. 100. Easy on-ramp
    101. 101. Portability
    102. 102. Visibility – from resources to users to actions</li></li></ul><li>Questions?<br />Michael Crandell - CEO, RightScale<br />Brian Adler - Sr. Professional Services Architect, RightScale<br />June 8th, 2011<br />
    103. 103. We hope to see you at our next RightScale User Conference!<br />See all presentations and videos at RightScale.com/Conference.<br />

    ×