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Country Paper Fish
 

Country Paper Fish

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    Country Paper Fish Country Paper Fish Presentation Transcript

    • COUNTRY PAPER MALAYSIA PREPARED BY : MALAYSIAN TEAM MOHD KHAIRI BIN MOHD HADZIR RIDZALUDDIN BIN ABD WAHID
    • INTRODUCTION
      • Name : Mohd Khairi Bin Mohd Hadzir
      • Name of Agency : Farmer’s Organization Authority Of Terengganu
      • ( FOA )
      • Position : Assistant Director Of FOA Terengganu
      • Name : Ridzaludin Bin Abd Wahid
      • Name of Agency : Farmer’s Organization Area Of Mersing Selatan
      • Johor
      • Position : General Manager
    • FOA ORGANIZATION CHART SUPERVISORY DIVISION HUMAN CAPITAL DEV DIVISION ORGANISATION & ENFORCEMENT AUDIT DIVISION DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL OF DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DIVISION MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL OF OPERATION DIRECTOR GENERAL FARMER’S MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE PERLIS ENGINEERING DIVISION FINANCE DIVISION LEGAL BRANCH CORPORATE AFFAIRS DIVISION FARMERS ENTREPRENEUR DIVISION AGRO BUSINESS DIVISION FARM PRODUCTION DIVISION PLANNING & ASESSMENT DIVISION PULAU PINANG KEDAH JOHOR MELAKA WILAYAH PERSEKUTUAN LABUAN KELANTAN SELANGOR SABAH TERENGGANU PAHANG PERAK INTERNAL AUDIT BRANCH
    • FARMER’S ORGANIZATION AUTORITY ( FOA )
      • Vision
      • Farmers’ Organization Authority (FOA) as a leading agency promoting the development of professionally-managed Farmers Organizations.
      •   Mission
      • To develop Farmers’ Organization as an effective services provider towards the creation of commercial farmers
    • FUNCTIONS OF FOA
      • The functions of the FOA as laid down in the Act are as follows:-
      • To boost, encourage and endeavor economic and social progress of farmers’ organizations
      • To register, control and supervise Farmers’ Organizations and making provision for related matters.
      • If a declaration was made through announcement under section 10, to design and implement any agricultural development in Farmers' Organization of those area: and
      • To control and coordinate the implementation of the activities
      • FOA implement all these activities that can be collated within three main functions as follow : functions as Registrar: functions as Management Agent : and functions as Development Agent.
    • GENERAL INFORMATION OF MALAYSIA
      • CAPITAL : Kuala Lumpur
      • OFFICIAL LANGUAGE ( S ) : Malay
      • OFFICIAL SCRIPTS : Malay alphabet
      • ETHNIC GROUPS   : 54% Malay , 25% Chinese , 7.5%
      • Indian ,11.8% other Bumiputera , 1.7% Other ,
      • GOVERMENT : Federal constitutional elective monarchy and Parliamentary democracy  
      • TOTAL AREA   : 329,845 km 2  / 127,354  sq mi   
      • POPULATION : 28.31 Million ( 2009 )
    • GENERAL INFORMATION OF MALAYSIA
      • Gross Domestic Product : 4.5% in 4th Quarter 2009
      • Consumer Price Index : 1.3% in January 2010
      • Producer Price Index : 4.2% in January 2010
      • Exports : 37% in January 2010
      • Imports : 31% in January 2010
      • Balance of Trade : 59.5% in January 2010
      • Unemployment Rate : 3.5% in 4th Quarter 2009
    • GENERAL INFORMATION OF MALAYSIA Source : Department Of Statistics , Malaysia POPULATION 2007 2008 2009 Population ( Million ) 27.17 27.73 28.31
    • OVERVIEW OF AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION IN MALAYSIA
    • FISHERIES DISTRICTS, MALAYSIA (PENINSULAR MALAYSIA)
    • FISHERIES DISTRICTS, MALAYSIA (EAST MALAYSIA)
      • In 2008, the fisheries sub-sector produced 1,731,988 tonnes of fish valued at approximately RM7,115 million. This total was an increase of 5.0% in terms of quantity as compared to the year 2007. The capture fisheries and aquaculture contributed 1,377,623 and 354,365 tonnes respectively to the national fisheries production.
      SCENARIO OF THE MALAYSIA FISHERIES INDUSTRY Source: Department of Fisheries Malaysia
    • AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION BY CULTURE SYSTEMS, 2007
    • ESTIMATED PRODUCTION AND AQUCULTURE VALUE FROM ALL AQUACULTURE SYSTEM, 1998-2007 MALAYSIA VALUE ( RM MILLION ) QUANTITY (TONNES )
    • ESTIMATED PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF FRESHWATER FISH FROM ALL FRESHWATER AQUACULTURE SYSTEM, 1998-2007 MALAYSIA VALUE ( RM MILLION ) QUANTITY (TONNES )
    • ESTIMATED PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF AQUACULTURE FROM ALL BRACKWISHWATER AQUACULTURE SYSTEM, 1998-2007 MALAYSIA VALUE ( RM MILLION ) QUANTITY (TONNES )
    • QUALITY CONTROL
      • Malaysian Aquaculture Farm Certification Scheme (SPLAM)
        • is a voluntary scheme with the purpose to encourage Good Aquaculture Practice (GAqP), including responsible and environmental friendly practices at the farm level. It is to ensure the products from the farm are safe for human consumption, of high quality, consistent and competitive.
    • QUALITY CONTROL Type : 2 types of box - 200 liter / 100 kg of fish - 60 liter / 30 kg of fish Benefit : a) The boxes, equipped with a microchip, will help Customs officers identify the contents and points of origin. b) aimed at streamlining the import process while improving food security features.
      • Macro planning for Sectoral Development (Aquaculture Industrial Zones)
      • Provide infrastructure/common facilities for cluster development projects
      • 3. Investment incentives (fiscal and non fiscal)
      • 4. Research & Development (R&D) supports
      • 5. Training and Human Resource Development
      • 6. Market Access (International promotions)
      • 7. Aquaculture Farm Certification Program ( SPLAM & SAAB )
      • 8. Credit facilities (Malaysian Agriculture Bank / FOArea)
      • 9. Technical support services
      GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS
    • SHRIMP PONDS MAIN MARINE CULTURED SYSTEM COCKLE CULTURE (BOTTOM CULTURE) CAGES RACK SYSTEM
    • FARMER’S ORGANIZATION AREA
    • FARMER’S ORGANIZATION AREA
      • PP, registered under the Farmers’ Organisation Act (Act 109) is a legal corporate entity and has Board of Directors elected by its members. PP is structured according to three levels – district, state and national. PP at state level is at second level whilst PP at national level is at third level. According to Act 109, the existence of PP is to increase social and economic status of its members though direct involvement in carrying out required activities to achieve its objectives, The activities include:
      • Make available expansion services and training facilities to prepare farmers with technology geared towards development of agriculture, horticulture, livestock, home economics, farm business and other commercial efforts.
      • Increase agriculture production amongst farmers and small scale farmer in order to encourage development and to commercialise farming and to enhance the agribusiness.
    • FARMER’S ORGANIZATION AREA
      • Provide farm requirement services. Farm machineries, credit facility and increase investment in agriculture and economy, rural funding, marketing, storage, drying, transportation and farm’s produce processing services.
      • Provide initial capital facility and increase investment amongst farmers through equity participation and exploration into the farming business and commercialization
      • Assist members in land acquisition in project development implementation.
      • Encourage and stimulate action group through community projects and assist in leadership development.
      • Provides social services, education and recreation facilities in order to increase social development and welfare of farmers’ families.
    • SEABASS ( Lates calcarifer ) MANGROVE RED SNAPPER ( Lutjanus argentimaculatus ) MARINE FINFISH CULTURED IN MALAYSIA GROUPER ( Epinephelus coioides ) SNAPPER ( Lutjanus malabaricus)
    • SHRIMP CULTURE
      • In Malaysia, breeding of tiger prawn has become one important economic activity since success produce seed largely and modern livestock technology usage. Prawn fishery majority or 70% prawn produced in areas of eastern. From the beginning 1980 ' and middle 1990 ', livestock prawn production has increased as much as sevenfold.
      • In year 2009, equal approximately 25,000 MT aquaculture prawn (>85% vinameai) worth RM600 million were released of 6,000 eh. Brackish water pool areas which involves about 950 farmer. Production of representative aquaculture prawn fishery only 10% of 111,900 MT of catch prawn.
      • Prawn industry for various species will continue to be encouraged where estimated at the cost of 150,000 metric tonnes RM2.7 's worth prawn billion able to be produced in year 2010 .
    • SHRIMP CULTURE White shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei ) Black tiger Shrimp ( Penaeus monodon )
      • The Asian sea bass ( Lates calcarifer ) is one of the most economically important species among our native Malaysian fishes. Most Asian sea bass are produced by commercial aquaculture in many Asian countries such as Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand and Indonesia.
      • Mature wild sea bass can only be captured during certain mating season and this also depends on the weather. Severe declines in landing Asian sea bass supplies throughout the year have led farms to grow this species intensively to meet consumer’s demand.
      • The increase was mainly due to the intensive culture in cages, land based systems using recirculation water systems, open cement (breeding) and earthen ponds. For decades the culture of the marine fish in coastal cages have faced sporadic occurrences of diseases, sometimes with production losses of 50%.
      SEA BASS CULTURE
    • ESTIMATED SEA BASS PRODUCTION 2008-2010
    • SEAWEEDS PRODUCTION
      • The production of seaweeds recorded an increase of 18.9%, that was, 111,298 tonnes compared to 90,268 tonnes in 2007. Its value was also increased by 23.3% to RM22.3 million compared to RM18.1 million the year before.
    • In year 2007 freshwater fish breeding contribute as much as 70,064.29 metric tonnes worth RM349.42 million namely 26.09% and 25.08% respectively from total and output value total sub-sector aquaculture. Production and value show improvement 13.64% and 19.53% compared 2006 namely 61,652.48 metric tonnes and RM292.34 value million. Fish livestock in pool contribute as much as 48,532.15 metric tonnes or 69.27% from total production freshwater fish. This figure grew by 17.58% compared production in year 2006 namely as much as 41,275.43 metric tonnes. It value also rising to RM239.69 million of RM195.95 million in year previous, namely increase as much as 22.32%. The major bred is catfish (21,406.09 metric tonnes worth RM63.37 million), red talapia (15,960.05 metric tonnes worth RM92.75 million) and Patin (3,190.75 metric tonnes worth RM17.56 million). FRESHWATER AQUACULTURE
    • RED TILAPIA ( Oreochromis sp. RIVERINE CATFISH ( Pangasius sp.) CATFISH ( Clarias sp.) GIANT FRESHWATER PRAWN ( Macrobachium rosenbergii )
    • JAVANESE CARP ( Puntius gonionotus ) GRASS CARP ( Ctenopharyngodon idellus ) CATFISH ( Mystus sp .) RIVERINE CARP ( Leptobarbus hoevenii )
    • MARKETING ISSUES
      • Inconsistence in Pricing and Marketing
      • High Cost of Production
      • Lack of Marketing Infrastructure .
      • Wholesomenes of the product.
    • CONSTRAINTS IN AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION
      • Economic
        • Other industry
      • Technology
        • Quality fry/broodstock
        • Production cost
      • Infrastructural and Institutional Support
      • Marketing
      • Skilled workers
      • Seasonal monsoon
    • CONCLUSION
      • Malaysia offers good potential for investment due to good infrastructures, government support, political stability, and availability of abundant natural resources e.g. water bodies and land.
    • THANK YOU….