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Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple
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Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple

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Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple for people like me. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

Reliability Centered Maintenance Made Simple for people like me. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

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  • 1. RCMBlitzTM RCM Made SimpleIntroduction to RCM Blitz™Presented by:Doug PlucknetteWorld-Wide RCM Discipline Leader What would you do with more free time?GPAllied Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 2. RCMBlitzTM Welcome to our RCM Blitz™!“When it comes to building a complete maintenancestrategy that will achieve and maintain the inherentdesigned reliability of an asset, there is no other toolavailable that has the success record of traditional RCM.” Doug Plucknette Reliability Centered Maintenance Using… RCM Blitz Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 3. RCMBlitzTMSpecific Benefits of Applying the RCM toYour ProcessY PYour Company will be able to develop a complete maintenance strategy for your equipment that includes clearly written and precise preventive and predictive maintenance tasksYour Company will be able to put into place failure-finding tasks that will reduce the g probability of catastrophic HSE (Health, Safety, Environmental) failures Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 4. RCMBlitzTMSpecific Benefits of Applying the RCMMethod to Your Process, cont’dM th d t Y P t’dYour Company will learn how to reduce MTTR (Mean Time To Restore) through the use of Consequence Reduction TasksYour Company will be able to determine the spare parts that need to be stored on site and the parts that can stored by a vendorYour Company will learn how to identify where to apply the RCM Blitz™ process based on pp y p Reliability Measures Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 5. RCMBlitzTMSpecific Benefits of Applying the RCMMethod to Your Process, cont’dM th d t Y P t’d• Reduce Emergency/Demand maintenance work• Reduce maintenance costs by reducing secondary equipment damage• Reduce unit cost of product by lowering maintenance costs and improving Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) q p ( )• Increase the understanding of how your equipment is supposed to work for both operations and maintenance people ti d i t l Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 6. RCMBlitzTMSpecific Benefits of Applying the RCMMethod to Your Process, cont’dM th d t Y P t’dDevelop a detailed and effective troubleshooting guide based on actual failure alarms, effects and symptomsDevelop detailed operations checklists to ensure proper set-up and operation of equipment - (What would the reliability of the airline industry be without checklists?)Learn how to apply the RCM process to new pp y p equipment designs Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 7. RCMBlitzTMWhy Does the RCM Method Work?• RCM adds the right amount of structure and discipline to the expert knowledge of your people• The finished product is a complete maintenance strategy based on predicting, preventing and eliminating specific Failure Modes• The airline industry has a proven record of reliability and safety yet their maintenance cost per replacement value is lower than most manufacturing maintenance l i l th t f t i i t• The big difference is leadership, structure and discipline Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 8. RCMBlitzTMSection 1 RCM HistoryRCMBlitzTM What would you do with more free time? Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 9. RCMBlitzTMThe History of RCM• US DOD and United Airlines• Utilities Industry• Manufacturing• Commercial Standards for RCM – SAE J1011 – PASS55 Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 10. RCMBlitzTMVarious Approaches to RCM• Traditional – SAE J1011 – 7 Steps p• Streamlined• PMO Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 11. RCMBlitzTMSection 4 RCM MaintenanceSt ateg esStrategiesRCMBlitzTM What would you do with more free time? Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 12. RCMBlitzTMMaintenance Tasks• The key to ensuring the designed reliability of your process is selecting the correct y g maintenance task to address a specific failure mode or cause of failure Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 13. RCMBlitzTMMaintenance Tasks, cont’dIn RCM we have 5 types of maintenance tasks1. On-condition Maintenance2.2 Preventive Maintenance3. Failure Finding4.4 Redesign5. Run to Failure Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 14. RCMBlitzTMOn-Condition Maintenance A maintenance task that is put into place to detect failure resistance to a specific failure mode The detection of failure is based on a known potential failure condition Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 15. RCMBlitzTMTraditional Types of On-ConditionMaintenanceM i t• Vibration Analysis• Thermography• g Ultrasonic Testing• Tribology• g Non-Destructive Testing• Motor Current Analysis• Process Verification Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 16. RCMBlitzTMNon-Traditional Types of On-ConditionMaintenanceM i t• Human Senses Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 17. RCMBlitzTMHow PdM Works – Early Identification ofDefectsD f t P F Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 18. RCMBlitzTMCompleting the P-F Curve • RCM Reliability Centered Maintenance • Precision Alignment • FMEA • Precision Balancing • Design RCM Blitz • Installation Standards • Five Rights of Reliability • Torque Specifications • Precision Tools • Select S S l t Supplier Agreements li A t • Requirements Documents • Design Standards Reactive Proactive Maintenance/Reliability Tasks PdM Tasks Maintenance sistance to Failure I Installation t P Potential Failure F Functional Res I-P Interval Failure P-F Interval T - Time The Modified P-F Curve and I-P Interval are intellectual property of Reliability Solutions, Inc. (Patent Pending) Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 19. RCMBlitzTMPreventive Maintenance (PM) Tasks• Preventive maintenance is time based, it is performed on equipment that has a known age or useful life f l lif• These tasks should be set up to prevent failures on components that fit age based failure patterns (A-C)• Scheduled Inspection, Scheduled Rework p , and Scheduled Discard are preventive maintenance tasks Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 20. RCMBlitzTMFailure Finding Tasks Scheduled inspections of a hidden function item, intended to find functional failures that have already occurred but are not evident to the operating crew The objective of a failure finding task is to ensure adequate availability of a hidden function Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 21. RCMBlitzTMRedesign Any change in equipment, process, or procedures In order for a redesign to be considered applicable and effective it must: – Eliminate the failure – Be cost effective – Reduce the conditional probability of failure to an acceptable level – Change the function of an item from hidden to evident Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 22. RCMBlitzTMNo Scheduled Maintenance This becomes the maintenance strategy when there is no applicable or effective task, or no applicable or effective redesign *When “No Scheduled Maintenance” is your maintenance strategy, you must put in place a consequence reduction strategy Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 23. RCMBlitzTMConsequence Reduction Strategy When no schedule maintenance is the only remaining strategy, it becomes important to g gy make sure you have the proper spare parts, resources and procedures in place to reduce the th consequence of th failure f the f il Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 24. RCMBlitzTMPulling It All TogetherSo how is all of this accomplished? Apply the RCMBlitz™ process to your equipment! Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 25. RCMBlitzTMSection 5 The RCM ProcessRCMBlitzTM What would you do with more free time? Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 26. RCMBlitzTMThe 7 Steps of Reliability Centered MaintenanceTraditional RCM Methodologies fit this 7-step process defined bySAE standard JA1011:1. What are the functions of the asset?2. In what way can the asset fail to fulfill its functions?3. What causes each functional failure?4. What happens when each failure occurs?5. What are the consequences of each failure?6. What should be done to prevent or predict the failure?7. What should be done if a suitable proactive task cannot be found? Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 27. RCMBlitzTMThe RCM Process1. List the Process Functions2. List the Functional Failures3. List the Failure Modes and Probability of Failure4. Describe the Failure Effects5. Determine Consequence Category6. Run the Failure Mode through the RCM Decision Process7. Select a Maintenance Task and assess spare parts p p Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 28. RCMBlitzTMListing Functions• Function – The normal or characteristic actions of an item, defined in terms of performance capabilities – Point at which you actually begin your RCM analysis – Listing the system and component functions is a key step in the RCM process y p p – The first function we list will be the System Function or Main Function – The System Function will clearly state what the intent of the process is, and the performance standards it is expected to maintain p Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 29. RCMBlitzTMMain FunctionThe Main Function or System Function The reason the asset or process exists including p g the expectation of the process and performance standards we need to maintain Example Main Function If you were about to analyze a process that made #2 pencils, your main function would be: 1.To b bl to 1 T be able t make #2 pencils at a rate of 1200 units per k il t t f it hour, while meeting all quality, safety, health, and environmental standards Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 30. RCMBlitzTMMain Function, cont’d• Once you have listed the Main Function and determined the performance standards, you y will move on to list all of the support functions Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 31. RCMBlitzTMSupport FunctionsDescribe the functionality of each component within the system – The support function for fuel piping would be: • To be able to contain and transport fuel – The support function for a gear box would be: • To be able to reduce RPM by a 4 to 1 ratio – The support function for a E-Stop button would be: • To be capable of shutting down the system in the event of an emergency – A support function for equipment structure would be: • To be able to support the vessel Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 32. RCMBlitzTMHidden Functions• Functions that will not be evident to the operating crew under performance of their g normal duties In a high level probe a hidden function would be: To be capable of shuting down tank supply when it reaches a set level The function of this device during normal operations of the system is not evident to the operator Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 33. RCMBlitzTMFunctional Failure• Failure of an item to perform its normal actions within specified performance standards• The functional failure is phrased as the inverse of the function Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 34. RCMBlitzTMFunctional Failure, cont’dThere may be one or more functional failures for every function y Main Function 1. To be able to make # 2 pencils at a rate of 1200 units per hour while meeting quality, health, quality health safety and Environmental standards Functional Failure 1. 1. Unable to make #2 pencils at all 1. 2. Unable to make pencils at a rate of 1200 per hr 1. 3. Unable t 1 3 U bl to meet quality standards t lit t d d 1. 4. Unable to maintain health, safety and environmental standards Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 35. RCMBlitzTMFailure Modes The specific manner of failure; the circumstances or sequence of events which leads to functional failure Should be written in a way that describes the Part, Problem, and the Specific Cause of failure • Fuel Pump Bearing (Part) • Seized (Problem) • Fails due to lack of lubrication (specific cause) ( p ) Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 36. RCMBlitzTMFailure Modes, cont’d When listing Failure Modes you should remember to include: – All failure modes that have occurred – All dominant failure modes – Failure modes that are likely to occur – Failure modes that have occurred on similar equipment Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 37. RCMBlitzTMFailure Modes, cont’dDo Not List: Failure modes that are highly unlikely to occur! Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 38. RCMBlitzTMFailure Modes, cont’d• When listing failure modes, be sure to write them at root cause level• Failure modes should be written at the level of which you maintain the equipment Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 39. RCMBlitzTMFailure Effects The immediate physical effects of a functional failure on surrounding items and g on the functional capability of the equipment Failure Effects are the principal determinant of failure consequences Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 40. RCMBlitzTMFailure Effects, cont’dFailure Effect statements should include: – Events that lead up to the failure p – The first sign of evidence by which the operating crew will recognize the failure has occurred ill i h f il h d – All of the secondary effects that resulted from the failure – Events required to bring the process back to normal operating condition Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 41. RCMBlitzTMExample Failure Effect StatementFailure Mode – Fuel pump bearing seized due to lack of lubricationFailure Effect Statement –Without proper lubrication, the pump bearing will heat up, vibrate and if left to its own devices eventually seize ( y (events leading up g p to the failure) When the bearing fails the pump shuts down, the flow switch will alarm the operators when the flow falls below 75 gpm for more than one minute (operators first sign of evidence)The operator will attempt to restart the pump and it will again shut down Operator will call maintenance to trouble shoot, repair and replace (events required to bring process to normal operating condition) Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 42. RCMBlitzTMThe RCM Decision ProcessUses a series of questions to determine: – The consequence category of the failure q g y – A maintenance task to predict the failure – A maintenance task to prevent the failure – A redesign task to eliminate the failure – A failure finding task to reduce the probability of hidden failures – An inspection that reduces the probability of failure to an acceptable level – A consequence reduction task to reduce MTTR for run to failure decisions Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 43. RCMBlitzTMFailure Consequences The first step in the RCM decision process is to locate the correct category for the failure consequence f il Each Failure Mode will fall into one of these Fail re ill four categories: – Hidden Failure Consequences – Health, Safety, or Environmental Consequences – Operational Consequences – Non-Operational Consequences Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 44. RCMBlitzTMHidden Failure Consequences• Consequences that result from the failure of a Hidden Function• The failure of this device will not be evident to the operating crew during the performance of their normal duties Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 45. RCMBlitzTMHidden Failures Examples of components with Hidden Functions: – Emergency Stop Switches – High Level Switches – Relief Valves – Rupture Discs – Pressure S it h P Switches – Redundant Devices Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 46. RCMBlitzTMHealth, Safety, and EnvironmentalConsequences Consequences resulting from a functional failure that could have a direct adverse effect on health, safety, or environment Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 47. RCMBlitzTMOperational Consequences The economic consequences of a failure that interferes with the planned use of operating g equipment Examples of Operational Consequences: • Cost of lost production • Cost f C t of maintenance i t • Cost of replacement parts • Cost of waste Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 48. RCMBlitzTMNon-Operational Consequences• The economic consequences of a failure that does not affect safety or the operational y capability of the equipment• Typically these are non-significant items that have no hidden functions Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 49. RCMBlitzTMThe RCM Decision Process• Once the correct consequence category has been selected, RCM then asks a series of questions to identify the correct maintenance task Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 50. RCMBlitzTMSpare Parts• No maintenance strategy is complete without assessing spare parts g – Having the correct spares in place is critical in reducing failure consequences• We use a risk based flow diagram to make spare parts decisions Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 51. RCMBlitzTMSection 6 RCM ImplementationRCMBlitzTM What would you do with more free time? Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 52. RCMBlitzTMRCM Implementation• Your RCM analysis is not complete until all tasks have been implemented• Each Task should be assigned to a specific g p person and assigned a due date• Implementation can be tracked in the database Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 53. RCMBlitzTMRCM Management Review Meetings• Communication is critical to successful implementation• Report implementation progress• Develop future path for critical assets• C Communicate success i t Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 54. RCMBlitzTMBarriers to Successful Implementation• Failure to prioritize tasks• Unrealistic due dates• Analysis/Task ownership• Resource allocation Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.
  • 55. RCMBlitzTM Questions?rsmith@gpallied.com ith@ lli d Copyright 2008 Allied Reliability, Inc.

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