Elements
LEVEL 1
NOT ENGAGED
LEVEL 2
EXPERIMENTING
LEVEL 3
ENLIGHTENED
LEVEL 4
GOOD PRACTICE
LEVEL 5
BEST PRACTICE
Hierarc...
Elements
LEVEL 1
NOT ENGAGED
LEVEL 2
EXPERIMENTING
LEVEL 3
ENLIGHTENED
LEVEL 4
GOOD PRACTICE
LEVEL 5
BEST PRACTICE
Operati...
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Lubrication Maturity Matrix

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Do you know the current gaps in your lubrication program? If not use this maturity matrix to identify the gaps based on known best practices. This is one great tool anyone can use who are looking to optimize their lubrication program. Review the matrix with your maintenance staff and ask for their comments.(comments by a maintenance staff will give you an indication of their lubrication knowledge)

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Lubrication Maturity Matrix

  1. 1. Elements LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 3 ENLIGHTENED LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Hierarchy No functional hierarchy exists. Plant uses the asset list from accounting. No understanding of the difference between asset and equipment. Plant utilizes a smart CMMS identification number for hierarchy purposes. Machines, components, and parts exist on the same indenture levels. Plant has a hierarchy down to the system level. Some machines exist on their own indenture level. No real consistency. List not accurate. Plant has a hierarchy down to the machine level. Some components exist on their own indenture level. List is fairly consistent and at least 70% accurate. Hierarchy exists down to the component and/or lube point level. List is very consistent across different areas and +95% accurate. Data is validated on a frequent and regular interval. Asset Catalog No Component Attribute Library. Some component attributes recorded for a few pieces of critical equipment. Component attribute data contains basic lubrication information only. Information necessary for basic lubrication design (component mfg/model, size, speed, temp, environmental considerations, etc). Comprehensive library exists, inclusive of all lubrication-related attributes. Level 3 + lube types, equipment modifications for lube tasks, breathers, filtration, etc. Suitable for complete equipment BOM. Records can only be changed by Planner. Data validated on an as-needed basis. Level 4 considerations + All component attributes databased. Records are under document control. Data validated on regular and frequent intervals. Current Lubrication Program Design No formal program. Basic program design; looks at manufacturer recommendations and basic component attributes. Formally designed program that looks at specific operating and environmental characteristics to determine required tasks, intervals, and volumes. Formally designed program inclusive of Level 3 with tasks grouped into lubrication routes by area, task, and interval. Formally designed program inclusive of Levels 3 and 4, with lubrication routes and visual inspection data collection. Rounds logging application in place with integrated task management and reporting capabilities. Monitoring, Tracking, and Reporting No accounting for lubrication. Lubrication included in generic maintenance reporting with generic data and targets. Some specific reporting for lubrication with specific data sources and targets. Comprehensive systems set targets, monitor consumption, identify defects, quantify savings, and provide budget tracking. Level 4 capabilities + Integrated platform for monitoring and reporting capabilities. Internal Marketing No promotion of lubrication program. Informal contacts used to promote lubrication program and lubrication-related gains. Formal methods (email campaigns) to promote lubrication awareness to lubrication and maintenance staff. Program in place for staff awareness and regular publicity campaign. Marketing the value of lubrication program and the performance of lubrication management both within and outside the organization. Investment No investment in developing lubrication program. Only low-cost measures or short-term payback criteria considered. Investment decisions based on long-term paybacks for increased reliability; methodical implementation focused on criticality. Monies dedicated for the modification of existing facility assets for the maintenance of in use lubricants and proper storage of new lubricants. New asset investments required to be designed/equipped for the proper maintenance and handling of new and used lubricants. Lubrication Program Management Responsibilities No evidence of assignment of lubrication tasks and duties. Unwritten set of lubrication responsibility assignments. Lubrication function in place and managed at lower levels of organization to include oil analysis, regrease, and visual inspection. List of lubrication responsibilities and their assignment exists for key lubrication staff. Detailed lubrication RASCIs exist and are comprehensive and regularly reviewed. Dedicated staff for Lubrication Program. Lubrication Training and Awareness No lubrication training provided. Ad hoc training provided through lubricant or other service providers; product and process specific. Lubrication Awareness Training available to management and involved staff; focus on lubrication fundamentals. Fundamental lubrication and oil analysis training provided to those involved in lubrication program. Lubrication technicians have received training and are certified as MLT and/or MLA; Lubrication Awareness Training is available to all personnel involved in operations. Reporting Procedures No reporting. Reports only issued if prompted by a business need, or when problem exists. Occasional reporting, verbal or hard copy, informal with timeline variability. Routine reporting within CMMS on a structured timeline. Routine reporting takes into account equipment criticality, failure modes and symptoms, primary and secondary detection techniques. All equipment considered. Integrated “Asset Health” reporting system in place inclusive of all applied CBM technologies as well as lubrication tasks. Existing Plant and Equipment Modification Equipment modifications to minimize downtime for lubrication servicing has not been considered. Some equipment may have manufacturer-installed components such as visual level gauges or sample valves, but additional modifications are not considered. Critical equipment components are modified with hardware to ease the burden of task completion (desiccant breathers, level gauges, grease lines). Critical equipment components are modified to include desiccant breathers, level gauges, sample valves, quick connects, grease lines, etc. Lubricated components are modified based on criticality, sump size, operating conditions. Status of Existing Plant and Equipment Equipment is not maintained; leaks are observed and not repaired; strictly Run-to-Failure mentality. Equipment is given basic care to keep it running until failure or plant shutdown. Basic preventive maintenance on calendar basis and repair as needed. Equipment is well maintained and functional. Preventive and condition based maintenance is performed. Repairs are performed as needed. Level 4 + Equipment modifications have been made to support associated lubrication tasks. Equipment is clean and labeled / lube positions identified. Plant and Equipment Replacement No consideration for ease of lubrication in selection process. Equipment is replaced with similar components; sealed bearings may be considered. Equipment is replaced with similarly designed components; aftermarket modifications are made. Equipment is selected to be the most appropriate to the application and is modified with appropriate lubrication hardware prior to being installed. Equipment utilizes lubricants that are already included in the lubrication program with minimal exceptions. Equipment is selected to be the most appropriate to the application with appropriate lubrication hardware installed by manufacturer. Equipment utilizes lubricants that are already included in the lubrication program. Lubrication / Maintenance Procedures No regular inspections or lubrication maintenance carried out. Procedures cover parts of plant and/or basic information available (machine and lubricant type). Procedures cover partial/critical plant with routine task details (machine, lubrication, points, lubricant grade(s), frequency, amount, etc.). Procedures cover all lubricated components with routine task details. Remedial action undertaken for most defects identified. Procedures cover all lubricated components with routine task details. Component condition information is documented and remedial action undertaken for all defects identified. Continued on back... RCLProgramElementsRCLProgramElementsTechnicalElementsTechnicalElements Ways to Measure Your Reliability Centered Lubrication (RCL) Maturity Matrix LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Helping companies build wealth and competitive advantage through world-class reliability across a global manufacturing network. 4200 Faber Place Drive • Charleston, SC 29405 • www.alliedreliability.com
  2. 2. Elements LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 3 ENLIGHTENED LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Operational Knowledge for Task Completion No consideration is given to completing lubrication-related tasks while equipment is operating. Lubrication-related tasks are completed while equipment is operating for assets that are accessible during operation. Inaccessible assets are maintained while equipment is down. Critical equipment is modified so lubrication tasks can be completed while component is running. Equipment directly involved with the production process is modified so lubrication tasks can be completed while component is running. When appropriate, all lubrication-related tasks are completed while equipment is running. Appropriate modifications are made to components to facilitate this. Program Documentation None available. Available standards and documentation are generic or poorly written. Difficult to apply as written. Some specific documents written; relevant documents are referenced on all tasks. Documents are comprehensive and cover most common tasks; relevant documents are referenced on all tasks. Documents are comprehensive and cover all common tasks and scenarios; relevant documents are provided with all tasks. Lubrication Storage No dedicated lubrication storage in place. Dedicated lubrication storage present. May not be centralized. Inadequately sized or located. Poorly ventilated or lit. Dirty, badly organized, or untidy. Centralized storage available. Adequately sized and located. Poorly ventilated or lit. Dirty, badly organized, or untidy. Level 3 + Well organized, clean, and tidy. Lubricants consolidated and well labeled. Level 4 + Dedicated lubrication storage room, dedicated bulk storage with filtration, desiccant breather, pressurized, climate control, bulk lubrication storage includes filtration with dedicated dispensing. Lubrication Dispensing No filtration or testing of new oil. Filtration included at some point in the handling/dispensing process. Not tested or not meeting cleanliness requirements. Filtered at a single delivery point. Meets target cleanliness prior to dispensing. Proper transportation methods or containers not considered. Filtered at the delivery point. Meets target cleanliness prior to dispensing. Proper transportation methods and containers utilized. Level 4 + Established procedures developed and adhered to for proper lubrication handling practices. Lubrication Selection / Type / Application No formal documentation of required lubricants. Current lubricants are based on a combination of manufacturer recommendations, lubricants that have always been used, and the supplier’s flavor of the month. Supplier-developed lubricant list based on general needs throughout the plant, some consolidation in order to fit need to available product. Available lubricants are based on an engineered approach that takes into account operating and environmental variables for critical equipment only. Available lubricants are based on an engineered approach that takes into account operating and environmental variables for all equipment and the available number optimized to meet specific needs. Oil Analysis Program Oil analysis currently not used. No consistent analysis performed, only utilized when there is a problem. Routine testing of critical compartments only (no regards for compartment size). Plant-wide routine testing. Some tailoring of frequency and test slate to meet equipment needs. Analysis strategy takes into account equipment criticality, failure modes and symptoms, primary and secondary detection techniques, and test effectiveness. All equipment considered. Integrated Asset Health program management and reporting capabilities. Lubrication Program Tracking No identifiable lubrication aspect tracked. Lubrication tasks tracked on paper, includes date completed and next due date. Lubrication tasks tracked within spreadsheet, includes date completed, new due date, and past due alert. Lubrication tasks tracked within scheduling or work order system, follow-up tasks are scheduled as required. Lubrication tasks tracked within integrated condition monitoring reporting system, scheduling, follow-up work etc. is tracked, as well as Asset Health and component condition assessed based on applied lubrication tasks and physical inspections. Data Sources No measurements taken and no records kept. Data is available in paper format for completed tasks/inspections/ oil analysis. Oil analysis results for critical components are tracked in standalone system; completed task/inspection information available in paper format or other database. Oil analysis results are migrated into CMMS system; completed task/inspection information is available in paper format or other database (possibly migrated into CMMS). Visual inspection data, including top off volumes, and quantified component conditions are collected during inspection tasks and stored in condition monitoring system, Oil analysis results are also included in the CBM database. Lubricant Usage Tracking No lubricant usage analysis prepared. Lubricant usage is tracked as a running total for all lubricants with limited identification of individual products. Lubricant usage analysis by type is monitored based on amount added/subtracted from inventory. Lubricant usage is monitored with respect to lubricant type and component type, amount purchased is compared to running total of amount dispensed by component type. Lubricant usage monitored with respect to lubricant type and component, amount of lubricant purchased is compared to running total of amount dispensed by specific component. Dispensed amounts are also compared to total waste oil disposed of. Report Outputs No management reports prepared. Reports prepared and provided to managers incorporating both technical and financial data when prompted by business need or when problem exists. Reports prepared and provided to managers incorporating both technical and financial data together with deviations from budget and comparisons with previous period. Reports prepared and provided to managers in a concise form, allowing both technical and financial data to be effectively utilized, with deviations from budget and comparisons with previous period. Reports prepared and provided to managers in a concise form, allowing both technical and financial data to be effectively utilized. Data normalized for ease of comparison. Impact of any uncertainties defined. KPIs No lubrication KPIs. Lubrication included in generic maintenance KPIs. Basic lubrication KPIs (Work Management, QA/QC). Suite of KPIs covering all facets of lubrication that are regularly reviewed and updated (Work Management, Plant Performance, QA/QC, Storage and Handling, Health, Safety and Environment). Suite of KPIs covering all facets of lubrication that are regularly reviewed and updated (Work Management, Plant Performance, QA/QC, Storage and Handling, Health, Safety and Environment). KPIs communicated and understood by all stakeholders. Results/ScorecardElementsResults/ScorecardElements LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 1 NOT ENGAGED LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 2 EXPERIMENTING LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 4 GOOD PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE LEVEL 5 BEST PRACTICE Ways to Measure Your Reliability Centered Lubrication (RCL) Maturity Matrix Helping companies build wealth and competitive advantage through world-class reliability across a global manufacturing network. 4200 Faber Place Drive • Charleston, SC 29405 • www.alliedreliability.com TechnicalElementsTechnicalElements

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