KPI Users Group- Failure Reports, Session 2_Dec09 Ajc[1]

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These are the slides from the December session from the KPI Users Group - Session 2 of Failure Reporting. Check these awesome slides out.

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KPI Users Group- Failure Reports, Session 2_Dec09 Ajc[1]

  1. 1. KPI Users Group “Failure Reports” Reports” Session 2 Presented by: Ricky Smith CMRP December 16, 2009 Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied “It Isn’t What You Know That Will Kill You, It Is What You Don’t Know That Will” Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 1
  2. 2. The PF Curve – Objective: Identify “P” as Early as Possible Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied The I-PF Curve – Objective: To Eliminate Causes of Failures at Point “I” Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 2
  3. 3. What Do You Need to Know About Failures? • What equipment is giving me the biggest losses and why? • What component is failing the most and why? • Where should you focus your RCA efforts? • Frequency of a failure mode – decrease? “Part”: Bearing – 27x “Defect”: Misalignment “Cause”: No Alignment Specs Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied What Is Root Cause Analysis (RCA)? • It’s a systematic, analytical work process that: – Alters manufacturing work environment to focus on eliminating defects rather than repairing failures g p g – Engages operations workforce to incrementally and continuously improve plant and business performance – Enhances connections between operations improvements and technologies – Increases safety , environmental performance and business profits Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 3
  4. 4. What Is Root Cause Analysis (RCA)? • Proactive – Performed on processes and systems prior to a failure – Looks to identify actions that will prevent specific undesirable conditions or situations from ever happening – When performed on equipment (versus processes and systems), it’s called Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied What Is Root Cause Failure Analysis (RCFA)? • Reactive – A failure or incident has occurred in a process, a system or a machine t hi – In the case of chronic problems, many similar failures have occurred – Looks to identify the causes and implement solutions that will prevent, or at least reduce, recurrences Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 4
  5. 5. Why Do RCA? • To Eliminate Defects – Any undesirable condition • Defects in manufacturing processes create: – Underperforming machines – Broken machines – Operations bottlenecks – Frustration ust at o – Lower morale Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Why Do RCA?, cont’d • Defects lead to: – Lost production opportunities – Product waste – Lower revenues – Injuries – Environmental incidents Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 5
  6. 6. 6 Sources Of Defects • Defects Come into Processes from 6 Sources 1. Equipment operation 2. 2 Equipment design 3. Spare/Repair parts 4. Maintenance workmanship 5. Marginal (sub-optimal) equipment 6. Raw materials Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Three Common Causes 1. Not Measuring the Right Thing 2. RCAs are executed on the “problem of the day day” 3. RCA results are not implemented Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 6
  7. 7. Not Measuring the Right Thing • What is the value of the RCA? • Did you achieve the expected results from RCA? – MTBF – Rework – Defect elimination Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied RCAs are Executed on the “Problem of the Day” Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 7
  8. 8. Triggers • There are at least 5 key areas for consideration when deciding to use RCA – Safety (an incident or a trend) – Environmental (an incident or trend) – Manufacturing (yields, throughput, availability, etc.) – Cost (unit cost, overshot budget, etc.) – Customer satisfaction (quality, delivery, value, etc.) – Other? Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Reactive or Proactive Triggers • Triggers can be either proactive or reactive • Proactive triggers might include responding to leading indicators or conducting FMEAs Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 8
  9. 9. Reactive Triggers • Reactive triggers can show up in metrics such as: – Personnel metrics • Recordable injury rate exceeds a predefined target • Lost workday injury – Environmental metrics • Environmental incident score exceeds a target number – Production metrics • Availability throughput or yields fall below target Availability, • Planning or scheduling effectiveness is below goal • A significant downtime incident occurs Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Proactive Triggers • Leading indicators – Investigate minor injuries to uncover underlying dangerous behavior patterns y g g p – Document and investigate ‘near misses’ – Monitor and respond to trends in equipment availability, throughput and yields – Monitor and respond to trends in % emergency work, schedule compliance or rework rate Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 9
  10. 10. Proactive Triggers, cont’d • Conduct FMEAs – Determine the effects of “hidden” chronic equipment failures q p – Identify and prevent what could go wrong but hasn’t yet Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied RCA Results Not Implemented • Changes to Maintenance Strategy? • Changes to Operating Strategy? • Training? • Procedures? Why is it so hard? Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 10
  11. 11. Simple Steps to Success 1. Establish quantifiable triggers • Potential Loss of production throughput at a cost $100,000 – $1,000,000 – One Reliability Engineer to lead effort, Predictive Maintenance Technician, Maintenance Technician, Operator, and others as needed • Potential Loss of throughput at a cost $1,000,000 – $5,000,000 – Two Reliability Engineers, Predictive Maintenance Technician, two Maintenance Technicians, Operator or Operators as needed • Potential Loss of production throughput at a cost $5,000,000 plus – Two Senior Reliability Engineers Fulltime, Predictive Maintenance Expert (possibly a consultant), RCM Expert (possibly a consultant) Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Triggers • There are at least 5 key areas for consideration when deciding to use RCA – Safety (an incident or a trend) – Environmental (an incident or trend) – Manufacturing (yields, throughput, availability, etc.) – Cost (unit cost, overshot budget, etc.) – Customer satisfaction (quality, delivery, value, etc.) – Other? Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 11
  12. 12. Ensuring Success? 2. Defining roles and responsibilities in the Root Cause Analysis Process Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied Develop a Tracking System • Develop Leading Indicators – Execute RCA before a failure occurs • Ensure measuring success of RCA Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 12
  13. 13. Questions? Copyright 2009 GPAllied GPAllied 13

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