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Best Practices in Maintenance and Reliability

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Maintenance and Reliability Best Practices are known practices which are applied by the best companies in the world.

Maintenance and Reliability Best Practices are known practices which are applied by the best companies in the world.

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    Best Practices in Maintenance and Reliability Best Practices in Maintenance and Reliability Presentation Transcript

    • Best Practices in Maintenance and Reliability Presented by: Ricky Smith, CMRP May 19, 2010 Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • It isn’t what you know that will kill you, It is what you don’t know that will Vibration Analysis and Infrared Thermography 156.9°F 118.9°F 140 110 119.1°F 120 100 153.1°F 100 90 80 80 74.5°F 75.3°F SHM - 150 Hp Vertical Turbine Pump 150 Hp VT -M1V Motor #1 Bear ing - Vert 1.4 Route S pectrum RMS Acceleratio n in G -s 1.2 25-Jun-03 09:05:36 OV ERALL= .3255 V-DG 1.0 RMS = .4796 LOAD = 100.0 0.8 RPM = 1800. (30.00 Hz) 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 Frequency in Hz 10 Route W av eform 25-Jun-03 09:05:36 Acceleratio n in G-s 5 RMS = .4763 P K(+/-) = 1.85/1.60 CRES TF= 3.88 P K ALARM CF ALARM 0 CF ALARM P K ALARM -5 -10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Time in mSecs Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • “A Proactive Reliability Process is a supply chain. If a step in the process is skipped or performed at a substandard level, the process creates defects known as failures. The output of a healthy reliability process is optimal asset reliability at optimal cost.” Source: Ron Thomas, Reliability Director, Dofasco Steel Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Nowlan and Heap Study stated… “…Without a precise definition of what condition represents a failure, there is no way to assess its consequences or to define the physical evidence for which to inspect. The term failure must, in fact, be given a far more explicit definition than “an inability to function” in order to clarify the basis of Reliability-Centered Maintenance.” Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Nowlan and Heap Study further stated… “…A failure is an unsatisfactory condition. In other words, a failure is an identifiable deviation from the original condition which is unsatisfactory to a particular user.” Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is a Failure? • “A functional failure is the inability of an item (or the equipment containing it) to meet a specified performance standard and is usually identified by an operator”. Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is a Failure? • “A potential failure is an identifiable physical condition which indicates a functional failure is imminent and is usually identified by a Maintenance Technician using predictive or quantitative preventive maintenance” Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Potential Failures – Where to Detect them? Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • PF Curve Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Potential Failures Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Functional Failure Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Our Goal Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is Maintenance? • To Maintain an Asset – Keep in existing condition – Keep, preserve, protect Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Problems Maintenance – Most Companies • Direct work is low (wrench time is less than 25%) • Lack of effective Planning – Planning is not defined • Lack of effective Scheduling – Delays are common Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Self Induced Failures • 70-80 % of equipment failures are Self-Induced – Reliability • Putting hydraulic fluid into a reservoir without filtering it • Welding on equipment without grounding properly • Running Equipment to Failure when it is not part of your maintenance strategy • Aligning couplings without using a laser • Improperly lubricating electric motors Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Common Problems • Equipment continuing to fail without a known root cause • PM is performed on time but equipment continues to break down • Age of equipment seems to be problem • There is never enough parts in the warehouse • Parts are not ordered fast enough • Maintenance personnel blamed for standing around Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Common Problems, cont’d • Management blames Maintenance for the company not meeting it’s business goals – Reliability is always the problem • The Maintenance process is built around reacting to equipment problems • Equipment history does not seem complete and hard to find data – Planner/Schedulers performing clerk duty • Production/Operations operates inefficiently but no one seems to be aware of the problem Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is Reliability? “The probability that a system will perform satisfactorily for a given period of time under stated conditions.” R1 = 95% R2 = 95% R3 = 93% R4 = 94% •Motor •Pump •Valve •Cylinder •79% Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Reliability Definitions • Function: What the owner or user of a physical asset wants it to do – Example: Pump: To transfer 300 Gallons of product at 60 PSI - 24 hours a day / 7 Days a week from point A to point B • Functional Failure: A state in which the physical asset or system is unable to perform a specific function to a level of performance that is acceptable by its owner or user – Example: Pump: To transfer less than 300 Gallons (250 Gallons) of a product at 60 PSI 24 hours a day / 7 Days a week (Functional Failure) •Source: RCM !! – John Moubray Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Failure Patterns Initial Break-in period Bathtub Pattern D = 7% Pattern A = 4% Random Pattern E = 14% Wear Out Pattern B = 2% Time Time Fatigue Pattern C = 5% Infant Mortality Pattern F = 68% Age Related = 11% Random = 89% Source: John Moubray, Nowlan & Heap Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Failure Patterns - 1990’s Data 68%  6% Why? Infant Mortality Into what category did 2%  10% the rest of the failures fall? Wear Out Source: Tim Allen, SUBMEPP Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Early Identification of a Defect Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Traditional Maintenance EVENT ENGINEERING COMPLETE WAREHOUSE FILE CABINET PARTS VENDOR TOOL BOX INFORMATION FABRICATE “JOE” IDENTIFY SUPERVISOR PRODUCTION NOTIFICATIO MECHANIC FIX N TEST GENERAL PURPOSE CLEAN SPECIAL PURPOSE ASSESS DISASSEMBLE PERSONAL JOB MEASURE TOOL CRIB TOOLS PLAN CONTRACTOR TIME Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • •a Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Where Do We Start? 1st Step •a Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Wikipedia Defines… • FRACAS is a system, sometimes carried out using software, that provides a process for reporting, classifying, and analyzing failures, and planning corrective actions in response to those failures Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • A Managed System For Continuous Improvement for Asset Reliability Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is it you want to know about Failures? • What equipment is giving me the biggest losses and why? • What component is failing the most and why? • Where should you focus your RCA efforts? • Frequency of a failure mode – decrease? Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What is your most Dominant Failure Pattern? Initial Break-in period Bathtub Pattern D = 7% Pattern A = 4% Random Pattern E = 14% Wear Out Pattern B = 2% Time Time Fatigue Pattern C = 5% Infant Mortality Pattern F = 68% Age Related = 11% Random = 89% Source: John Moubray, Nowlan & Heap Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Key Points to Know! • If you are managing to “P” on the PF Curve you get rid of most of your catastrophic or total function failure • If you are managing to “I”, your are managing the causes of failures and thus eliminate failures and optimize reliability • The best person to identify the “Defect or Problem” and “Cause” of the failure is your Predictive Maintenance Technician or Reliability Engineer Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • “The significant problems we face cannot be solved with the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.” - Albert Einstein Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Task/Functions Facility MTF Maint. Reliability Maint. Contract Maint. Owner Commander Manager Engineer Supervisors Officer Planner Inputting Work I R C R A C Order Data - CMMS/EAM Reviewing and I I R I C A C taking action on KPIs QA of Data I A C I C Input Failure Reports I I A R C C I Findings Maintenance I A R C C C Strategy Adjustments Responsibility “the Doer” Accountable “the Buck stops here Consulted “in the Loop” Informed “kept in the picture” Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Best Maintenance Practices • 90% of all work is planned • 85 – 90% Scheduled Compliance is met • 100% of a maintenance personnel’s time is covered by a work order • 100% of all maintenance personnel’s time is scheduled • 90% of scheduled work is planned • PMs are written with task steps, specifications, tools, etc Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Best Maintenance Practices, cont’d • Effective work procedures are written and followed • The 10% Rule of Preventive Maintenance is applied and managed • Store efficiency is more than 98% • Less than 1 hour for Mean Time To Order of parts Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Reliability Process Maintenance Process Monitoring of RCM Asset Health Asset Operations Criticality Process Root Cause Analysis Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Best Reliability Practices • MTBF is High • MTTR is monitored and measured • Reliability Engineering is focused 100% on the Reliability of Assets • All assets are prioritized based on risk to the business and equipment condition • FRACAS is implemented and used to make decisions on reliability improvements Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Best Reliability Practices, cont’d • Root Cause Analysis (RCA) is a common practice – Applied to any failure that is costly or repeats itself • Reliability is owned by production and maintenance and is apparent • Operator PMs are utilized effectively • Equipment Damage by Operators is minimal • Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) is applied to critical assets Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Best Reliability Practices, cont’d • Utilization of Assets is above 98% • Time based PMs are less than 20% • Key data is collected and disseminated to determine the health of an asset Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • “The problem with Management is they’re measuring the wrong things.” - Peter Drucker Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Leading and Lagging Indicators Maintenance Lagging • MTBF • Production Output • Maintenance Cost Scheduled Percent of PM Leading Compliance Planned Compliance Work Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Where to Start with Maintenance and Reliability Metrics • MTBF • MTTR • MTBR • PM Compliance • % of Planned Work • Scheduled Compliance • # of breaks to Schedule by Maintenance and Operations Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Where to Start with Maintenance and Reliability Metrics, cont’d • PM Labor Hours vs. EM Labor Hours • Maintenance Cost per unit produced • Stores Efficiency • Vendor Efficiency • Equipment Damage Cost Per Unit Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Steps to Success • Map your processes and identify leading and lagging KPIs in them • Be sure and have clear definitions of your KPIs • Assign RACI to metrics – Responsible – Accountable – Consulted – Informed • Develop scorecards from lowest level to highest (4-6 KPIs) Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Variation in Reliability • Variation is the largest cause of equipment failure Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Causes of Variation • Lack of an effective PM Program • Lack of a repeatable repairs with specifications • Lubrication issues, lack of lubrication, contamination, etc. • Operator Error • Use of wrong tool to make repair – Bearing heater • Use of wrong specification – Torque values Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Effects of Improper Installation or Maintenance Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • “Excellence is a Habit” - Aristotle, 330 BC Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • What are Work Procedures? • Preventive Maintenance • Corrective Maintenance • Operator Care • Lubrication Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Why are Work Procedures Important? • Repeatable process • Capture knowledge • Train new employees • Reduce self induced failures Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Steps to Reliability 1. Ensure your Equipment Hierarchy is effective 2. Prioritize assets according to consequence and risk 3. Identify the right maintenance strategy 4. Optimize Planning and Scheduling 5. Ensure Failure Data is captured and used for FRACAS – Failure Reporting, Analysis, Corrective Action System Copyright 2010 GPAllied©
    • Questions • Send your questions to rsmith@gpallied.com Copyright 2010 GPAllied©