Building a community<br />Rick Mans - Social Media Evangelist<br />
Youcannotcreate a community<br />Whatyoucan do<br /><ul><li>Communities are already there
The only thing you can do is help them better
Communities are groups of people that:
Have a common purpose
Have a motivation to interact
Have time to interact
Have shared experiences
Communities are participating on a platform they choose</li></ul>A community is not just a list of members and debates! <b...
Communities are part of human nature…<br />Cicero<br />We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community...
…and part of Capgemini’sTechnovision<br />Mash-up Applications<br />Mashup applications<br />Real-Time<br />Business<br />...
Communties are mentioned in these building blocks<br />Smart business networks<br />Social collaboration tools / <br />Wik...
Creating additional value through business innovation with markets, players and consumers constantly shifting position
Global ‘open’ markets where information on available products and vendors vastly increases the competition compared to the...
Wikis (e.g., Wikipedia)
Mash-up (e.g., iGoogle, RSS feeds etc.)
Hosted service (e.g., Google spreadsheets, Ikea bathroom designer)
Social Networking website (e.g., Facebook, My space etc.)</li></li></ul><li>From outsider to evangelist<br />
Get to the outsiders<br />Actionable steps<br />Set your goals<br />Identify who your members can be<br />Identify the dri...
Make outsiders viewers and visiting fans<br />Actionable steps<br />Create valuable content<br />Add value based on the id...
Makepassivemembersactivemembers<br />Actionable steps<br />Provide methods for interaction<br />With you<br />With each ot...
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Building a community

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This presentation contains an overview about things to keep in mind when trying to build a community. As one of the first slides already states: you cannot create a community, it is already there. However you can help the community better in several ways. Therefore a model of the different phases of a member in a community is used. Based on this model several actions are defined which a community manager could take to help the community. The last few slides contain an overview of several well known social media cases.

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  • Cicero: 106 BC – 43BC was a Roman philosopher, statesman, lawyer, political theorist, and Roman constitutionalist.Henrik Ibsen: 1828-1906 was a major 19th-century Norwegian playwright of realistic drama and poet. Jeremy Bentham 1748 – 1832: was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer.
  • Building a community

    1. 1. Building a community<br />Rick Mans - Social Media Evangelist<br />
    2. 2. Youcannotcreate a community<br />Whatyoucan do<br /><ul><li>Communities are already there
    3. 3. The only thing you can do is help them better
    4. 4. Communities are groups of people that:
    5. 5. Have a common purpose
    6. 6. Have a motivation to interact
    7. 7. Have time to interact
    8. 8. Have shared experiences
    9. 9. Communities are participating on a platform they choose</li></ul>A community is not just a list of members and debates! <br />
    10. 10. Communities are part of human nature…<br />Cicero<br />We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community with the human race.<br />Henrik Ibsen<br />A community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.<br />Jeremy Bentham<br />It is vain to talk of the interest of the community, without understanding what is the interest of the individual<br />
    11. 11. …and part of Capgemini’sTechnovision<br />Mash-up Applications<br />Mashup applications<br />Real-Time<br />Business<br />Process<br />Control<br />Real-time<br />business<br />process<br />control<br />Real-time <br />Integrated <br />Business <br />Intelligence<br />Real-time <br />integrated <br />business <br />intelligence<br />Composite <br />applications<br />Composite <br />Applications<br />Sensing Networks<br />Sensing networks<br />Packaged Sector /<br />Segment Solutions<br />Packaged sector /<br />segment solutions<br />Smart Business Networks<br />Smart business networks<br />Free Agents Nation <br />Free agents nation <br />Role Based User Portals<br />Role-based user portals<br />Social Collaboration Tools /<br />Wikinomics<br />Social collaboration tools /<br />Wikinomics<br />iPodification<br />iPodification<br />Software as a Service<br />Software-as-a-service<br />Google-fication<br />Google-fication<br />Utility <br />Business Infra-structure<br />Utility <br />business infra-structure<br />Mastered <br />Data Management<br />Mastered <br />data management<br />Jericho Style Security<br />Jericho style security<br />Rich Internet applications<br />Rich Internet Applications<br />Keytechnology building blocks<br />
    12. 12. Communties are mentioned in these building blocks<br />Smart business networks<br />Social collaboration tools / <br />Wiki-nomics<br />Free agents nation <br />From Transaction to Interaction<br /><ul><li>Organizations and individuals in a continuous cycle of learning, creating and collaborating
    13. 13. Creating additional value through business innovation with markets, players and consumers constantly shifting position
    14. 14. Global ‘open’ markets where information on available products and vendors vastly increases the competition compared to the levels of existing localized ‘closed’ markets</li></li></ul><li>From Content to People, the Technology Side is there…<br />•<br />Web 1.0 is an electronic <br />version of existing content<br />•<br />Value is generated by <br />aggregating content within <br />portals<br />•<br />Publishing technologies are <br />complex and slow to <br />implement<br />Web 1.0<br />Web 2.0<br />Traditional media<br />Google search<br />Gmail<br />Flicker<br />Mainly Broadband<br />Mainly narrow band<br />Alternative media blogs<br />netvibes<br />Publishing is complex and limited to few traditional media and online merchants<br />Value is created by aggregating content (portals)<br />Wikipedia<br />Easy publication for all<br />Value is generated by tools allowing to publish easily<br />2004<br />2005<br />Web 2.0 is an interactive collaborative environment<br /><ul><li>Blogs (e.g., Dell hell, You Tube, Flicker)
    15. 15. Wikis (e.g., Wikipedia)
    16. 16. Mash-up (e.g., iGoogle, RSS feeds etc.)
    17. 17. Hosted service (e.g., Google spreadsheets, Ikea bathroom designer)
    18. 18. Social Networking website (e.g., Facebook, My space etc.)</li></li></ul><li>From outsider to evangelist<br />
    19. 19. Get to the outsiders<br />Actionable steps<br />Set your goals<br />Identify who your members can be<br />Identify the drivers of the members<br />How technical are they?<br />Where are they already?<br />Choose a platform<br />Start promoting it (not once, but continuously)<br />Set goals and identify members<br />
    20. 20. Make outsiders viewers and visiting fans<br />Actionable steps<br />Create valuable content<br />Add value based on the identified drivers<br />Promote your content (continuously)<br />Continue promoting the platform (not once, but continuously)<br />Start solving real world tasks for your members<br />Catch the attention<br />
    21. 21. Makepassivemembersactivemembers<br />Actionable steps<br />Provide methods for interaction<br />With you<br />With each other<br />Enable co creation<br />Adapt your processes so you can handle co creation<br />Solve real world tasks for your members<br />Continue promoting the content<br />Continue promoting the platform<br />Interact<br />
    22. 22. Makeactivememberspassionatemembers<br />Actionable steps<br />Enable co creation<br />Adapt your processes so you can handle co creation<br />Let them promote the community, content and platform<br />Continue promoting the content<br />Continue promoting the platform<br />Create success<br />
    23. 23. Remember<br />Keep in mind that …<br /><ul><li>The phases of members is not a lineair process
    24. 24. There is stillan ‘offline’ world, paper butalso email are greatways to promoteyour platform. Do notignore ‘older’ media
    25. 25. Building a communitywilltaketime (a vividcommunitycostapproximately9 monthsto build, most enterprisesalready stop after6 months...)
    26. 26. Youreallyneed a community manager
    27. 27. Leadingbyexampleis the onlyway to build a community
    28. 28. Youshouldnotbeafraid to fail
    29. 29. Focus is important, notonlyonyour goals, butalsoon the goals of the members</li></ul>Failing fast and quickly is sometimes of tremendous benefit. Failure can be informative and serve to create longer lasting success; it’s synonymous with risk taking and experimenting. Also, the public is often forgiving of failure if it’s in the execution of a worthy principle.<br />
    30. 30. Platforms<br />What are the possibilities<br /><ul><li>Internal vs external hosted solutions
    31. 31. Existing platform
    32. 32. Create a new platform
    33. 33. Private vs public platforms</li></ul>Sharepoint<br />Lotus Connections<br />Almost an endless choice in platforms you can use (intern, extern, public, private)<br />
    34. 34. Cases<br />
    35. 35. Lego factory<br />SOLUTION<br /><ul><li>Lego launched the Lego Factory (http://factory.lego.com) – an online model of engagement for potential and existing Lego users, which allows users to design, share and buy their own customized LEGO models</li></ul>THE LEGO FACTORY WEBSITE <br />BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>Lego had traditionally been surrounded by a highly active constellation of Lego User Groups - fan communities comprising of both adult and young members
    36. 36. These groups maintained large online presence; operated independently of the company; exchanged and showed creative toy designs and models amongst themselves
    37. 37. Lego needed to move out of closed proprietary mode and adapt a participative strategy for customer interaction, which would utilize existing user creativity in product design</li></ul>BENEFITS<br /><ul><li>Designer users can then order the bricks needed to make their model, and also customize their own box for the model
    38. 38. Other users on the site can buy uploaded designs in the gallery, and will receive both the bricks for the model as well as the building instructions
    39. 39. Through the Lego Factory, the company has taken a step further in the evolution of user involvement, building strong brand relationship
    40. 40. The initiative has created high levels of awareness and interest with the consumers
    41. 41. The initiative has put Lego a step ahead of competition by moving out of closed proprietary content mode and involving fresh ideas from consumers and community for New Product Development
    42. 42. Users interested in custom-designing their own Lego models have to download and install the ‘Lego Digital Designer’ –
    43. 43. In the designer, the user can drag and drop to create a virtual toy design
    44. 44. Once the user has created a design, he can upload the same to the online gallery
    45. 45. Lego approves all designs before they are added to the online gallery, to filter out models for appropriateness for all age groups</li></li></ul><li>P&G connect + Develop<br />SOLUTION<br /><ul><li>P&G launched the ‘Connect + Develop’ initiative, tapping into a global innovation network comprising of a host of sources, right from independent innovators to virtual innovator networks such as InnoCentive
    46. 46. Having a clear sense of consumers' needs, the company identifies promising ideas throughout this network and applies its own R&D, manufacturing, marketing, and purchasing capabilities to them to enhance the rate of innovation</li></ul>BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>As P&G grew to a $70 billion enterprise, the global innovation model it devised in the 1980s was yielding shrinking success rates
    47. 47. Their R&D productivity had leveled off, and innovation success rate had stagnated at about 35%, whereas innovation costs were climbing faster than top-line
    48. 48. While P&G owned a 7500+ strong R&D team, it realized that viable product innovation was increasingly being done externally at small and midsize entrepreneurial companies</li></ul>P&G CONNECT + DEVELOP<br />P&G converts them into ‘science problems and sends into the network<br />P&G identifies top 10 customer needs<br />P&G’s Global Innovation Network<br />BENEFITS<br /><ul><li>More than 35% of P&G’s new products have elements that originated from outside P&G, up from about 15% in 2000
    49. 49. R&D productivity increased by nearly 60%
    50. 50. R&D investment as a percentage of sales is down from 4.8% in 2000 to 3.4% in 2006
    51. 51. P&G’s average two-month cycle of generating physical prototypes and testing them with consumers has reduced to around 24 to 48 hours</li></ul>P&G’s 7500+ R&D team work on solutions suggested and with internal communities<br />INNOVATIONS In Areas Of Packaging, Design, Marketing Models, Research Methods, Engineering, Technology, Etc <br />
    52. 52. Nivea<br />SOLUTION<br /><ul><li>As the mainstay of its ‘Beauty Is’ campaign, NIVEA launched a desktop application called Ticker, in collaboration with Skinkers
    53. 53. Built on Skinkers information broadcast technology, Ticker is a downloadable, opted-in application that pushes interactive content directly to the desktop
    54. 54. Messages sent via the Ticker to the desktop include news, beauty tips, competitions, video podcasts and questionnaires, with the objective of all messages being to drive consumers to the revamped NIVEA website</li></ul>BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>Nivea, a global leading skincare brand, wanted to transform the customer’s view of the company and its brand from being ‘skincare-focused’ to ‘beauty-focused’ and also wanted to increase presence in emerging economies
    55. 55. In this direction, the company had launched the ‘Beauty Is’ campaign at a global level, which included:
    56. 56. A complete revamp of both the global as well as regional websites
    57. 57. Regional websites to be a one-stop shop for all aspects of beauty and includes news, lifestyle advice, offers, competitions and video podcasts
    58. 58. While the campaign used a variety of channels including on and offline publications, email and advertising; the company was looking for a reliable way to drive consumers to the revamped website</li></ul>The company regularly publishes beauty and wellbeing related video podcasts on its website; notifications of the same are pushed to the user through Ticker<br />BENEFITS<br /><ul><li>By utilising the desktop as a communication channel, the company does not need to wait for customers to identify and open emails or remember to visit their website
    59. 59. The Ticker provides constant exposure to Nivea’s globally unified experience with a consistent message across its product range, building customer trust in the brand
    60. 60. Post-launch of the ‘Beauty Is’ campaign, the Germany-based company has benefited from high sales in emerging markets such as Eastern Europe, Latin America and Asia</li></ul>Users are asked to upload a photo on the site which depicts their idea of what ‘Beauty Is’; the entire collection of photos is also displayed on Ticker<br />
    61. 61. Nike+, in collaboration with Apple<br />SOLUTION<br />HEAR YOU RUN…<br />Sensor in the shoe helps the runner hear through the iPod, the details about pace, time, distance and calories burned<br />1<br />BACKGROUND<br />SEE YOU RUN…<br /><ul><li>Nike wanted to create an immediately resonant experience for a broad target market, from marathoners to fitness joggers
    62. 62. Nike+ was born as a multi-channel, multi-sensory marriage of Nike and Apple technologies
    63. 63. Nike+ provides a robust platform of virtual racing, progress tracking, motivational goals and stories, global community comparison tools</li></ul>On docking and synchronizing the iPod, Nike+ software loads the workout statistics to their website where the user will be able to track his/her workout progress<br />2<br />CONNECT AND CHALLENGE<br />Run data can be used to track progress, set goals, motivate runners. win rewards and challenge pals or all Nike+ users<br />3<br />CUSTOMER CENTRICITY THROUGH BETTER INTERACTION USING WEB 2.0<br />Nike.com<br />III<br />BENEFITS<br />Widgets for setting challenges, goals…<br />Blog facility for Nike+ users<br />Link to purchase Nike+ kit and other Nike gear<br /><ul><li>Nike+ is a unique way to engage with and promote higher levels of brand identity amongst Nike users
    64. 64. Delivers increased value to Nike users through a unique way of collaborating
    65. 65. Engages current and prospective Nike users with uninterrupted and targeted advertising
    66. 66. 20% reduction in ad budgets as Nike is moving towards developing its own media network through such technological endeavors</li></ul>I<br />II<br />III<br />III<br />II<br />I<br />
    67. 67. .. And there is more<br />Wikis<br />Peer to peer networking<br /><ul><li>P2P is a technique for efficiently sharing files either over the internet or within a closed set of users. P2P distributes files across many machines, often those of the users themselves.
    68. 68. Examples: Skype, Freenet, Spotify
    69. 69. Wikis such as Wikipedia are systems for collaborative publishing. They allow many authors to contribute to an online document or discussion.
    70. 70. Examples: Dell uses Wiki in their call centre and it has helped in reducing the number off clicks from 20 to 4 and decreased the average call time by 10-20%</li></ul>Mash-ups<br />RSS<br /><ul><li>Really Simple Syndication allows people to subscribe to online distributions of news, blogs, podcasts or other information
    71. 71. While banks and financial institutions are usually slow to adopt new technology, that is not the case with RSS adoption.
    72. 72. Examples: Federal Reserve use RSS to communicate bank rate changes, Long and Foster’s customers receive mortgage rates via RSS1
    73. 73. Mash - ups are aggregations of content from different online sources to create a new serviceo
    74. 74. Rather than build customized IT systems with hard-wired integration, Web 2.0 can enable mash-ups of existing Web services and data to do the job at lower cost and effort
    75. 75. Large companies often conceal their usage of mash-ups since it provides significant competitive advantage
    76. 76. Examples: Google Map was one of the first applications using mash-ups</li></ul>Blogging<br />Social networking<br /><ul><li>Blogs are online journals or diaries hosted on a Website and often distributed to other sites through readers using RSS
    77. 77. Examples: Libris Kungliga Biblioteket has a blog continuously reporting about news and projects, Pfizer has a CSR (corporate social responsibility) blog
    78. 78. Refers to systems that allow members of a specific site to learn about other members skills, talents, knowledge or preferences.
    79. 79. Examples: ABSOUT has a page on Facebook entitled Top Bartender, Ernst&Young utilizes Facebook career page for hiring</li></ul>Collective intelligence<br /><ul><li>Refers to any system that attempts to tap the expertise of a group than an individual to make decisions. Technologies that contribute to collective intelligence include collaborative publishing and common databases for sharing knowledge
    80. 80. Examples: Companies like BootB and DesignBay are using collective intelligence in order to bypass traditional marketing and creative agencies</li></li></ul><li>The online channel develops fast and what yesterday was a “Differentiator” may today be a “Must have”<br />Differentiators<br />Becoming <br />the norm<br />Must have<br />
    81. 81. Contact details<br />Rick Mans<br />rick.mans@capgemini.com<br />http://twitter.com/rickmans<br />http://www.linkedin.com/in/rickmans<br />

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