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Content SEO: Top SEO considerations for online writers and editors

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Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the content and architecture of the pages on a website so web search engines can optimally interpret the meaning of the content they …

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the content and architecture of the pages on a website so web search engines can optimally interpret the meaning of the content they contain, and thus give those pages the optimum stack rank they deserve for keyword queries compared to similar pages on competing websites.

The World Wide Web is a massively large place, with tens of billions of pages published (and more added every day). How does an online author or editor get their content page to stand out from the competition and become discoverable to their target audience? Through web search, of course, employing a judicious dose of SEO.

I wrote this PowerPoint deck to define and discuss the most critical on-page SEO techniques available to online publishers. I cover industry standard (white hat) SEO best practices, tip and tricks, etc., for optimizing the body text and page metadata structures of content webpages, be they articles, galleries, or even stories targeted for Google News. I also delve into keyword research techniques using tools provided by search engines. Finally, I offer advice on how to identify yourself to Google as an author of original, high quality content and how to get your photo shown next to your content listings in the Google search results pages. All of this is the essence of content SEO.

I hope you find this presentation informative and helpful to your success as an online author/editor. Enjoy!

Rick DeJarnette
Website Optimization, Search Engine and Social Media Marketing, & Content Development
The SEO Ace

Published in Marketing , Technology , Design
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  • 1. Content SEO Top SEO considerations for online writers and editors
  • 2. The World Wide Web As of October 2013: • Number of websites worldwide: 767 million • Number of URLs indexed in Google worldwide: ~39 billion How will online readers find your content page? Source: http://www.worldwidewebsize.com/ 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 2
  • 3. Agenda • Introduction to search engine optimization (SEO) • How writers and editors can affect SEO • • • • • • • Page title: the <title> tag Page description: the <meta> description tag Page headline: the <h1> tag Alternative text for images: the <img> tag’s alt text attribute Body content: Enough body text with inline links News keywords: <meta> news_keywords tag Social media promotion • Google Authorship Markup • Keyword research tools and techniques (if time allows) 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 3
  • 4. Quick Poll • How many of you write or edit online content? • How many of you can edit the page metadata or have access to the HTML code in those pages? • How many of you write or edit original online news content? • How many of you use social media to promote your work? • How many of you get bylines with your writing? • How many of you would like to be recognized as an authority in your subject area in Google? 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 4
  • 5. What is SEO? Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the content and architecture of the pages on a website … … so web search engines can optimally interpret the meaning of the content they contain, … … and thus give those pages the optimum stack rank they deserve for keyword queries … … compared to similar pages on competing websites. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 5
  • 6. What is SEO? Search engines: • Are designed to emulate human readers, and thus strive to rank webpages in the order of what is most useful, informative and relevant to the search query • Employ several hundred prioritized factors in their page ranking algorithm • Update their algorithms many hundreds of times per year • Are not humans, and thus benefit from a little spoon-feeding of information about the content on a page (in metadata HTML tags) • Recognize that the spoon-feeding is a potential point of vulnerability, and thus are extremely vigilant about combating web spam & overly-aggressive, malicious, deceptive (black hat) SEO 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 6
  • 7. SEO Ranking Factors – Periodic Table Source: http://searchengineland.com/seotable 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 7
  • 8. SEO: How Writers & Editors Have Impact Best ways online writers and editors can affect SEO: • Page title: <title> tag • Page description: <meta> description tag • Page headline: <h1> tag • Alt text for images: <img> alt text • Body text with inline links • News keywords: <meta> news_keywords tag • Social media promotion Note: the old <meta> keywords tag has no keyword relevance value in modern SEO Producing high content quality is the key! 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 8
  • 9. Defining content quality Questions to identify what counts as high-quality content (YES is good!): • Does the site avoid having duplicate, overlapping or repeat articles on the same or very similar topics with slightly different keyword variations? • Do the articles provide original content or information, original reporting, original research or original analysis? • Do the articles contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond the obvious? • Do the articles avoid being too short, unsubstantial or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics? Source: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2011/05/more-guidance-on-building-high-quality.html by Amit Singhal, Google’s head of search 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 9
  • 10. SEO Editorial Best Practices Summary HTML metadata tag Length limits * Purpose <title> 40 - 65 characters, including length of site branding (if used) Blue hyperlink in search engine results pages (SERPs). The most important tag for keyword relevance. <meta> description 120 - 160 characters Quick synopsis of what the searcher can expect to find on the page, written in compelling, descriptive and actionable terms, seen only in SERPs. <h1> 10 - 200 characters Visible, on-page headline defining the page content. <img> alt text 25 - 150 characters A text description of the digital image relevant to the page content to enhance keyword relevance. <meta> news_keywords Up to 10 keywords or keyword phrases, parsed by commas Identifies additional keywords as relevant to the content in the Google News index (only applicable to sites accepted into Google News). Body text 125 non-linked words bare The body text, read by search engines, enables them minimum; at least 250+ to consume the content, interpret its topical theme, words is better and establish relevance to keywords. Inline links Strive for at least one relevant link in the first 150 words Adds value to article by pointing to additional, related content for readers; use descriptive link text. * All character counts include space characters 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 10
  • 11. Where page metadata shows up Page title (<title> tag) Page headline (<h1> tag) Page description snippet (<meta> description tag) Not visible: • <img> tag alt text attribute • <meta> news_keywords tag 10/15/2013 Body text Inline link Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 11
  • 12. <title> tag The most important tag for creating keyword relevance
  • 13. <title> tag Purpose • Concisely describes the content theme of the page • Most important tag for establishing keyword relevance for the page with search engines • Used as blue link text in Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs) Best Practices • Write in natural English language for humans, but format the tag text for search engines • Write tag text highly relevant to the content of the page; avoid metaphors and irony • Use the most potent keywords found in the body text of the page (determine keyword potency in Google AdWords) • Put the core keyword phrase toward the start and site branding, if used, at the end of the tag text • Ensure text length is between 40-65 characters, including spaces • Avoid using stop words (such as: the, is, while, then, of, we, etc.) when possible; they offer no keyword relevance • Differentiate <title> text from the page headline (<h1>) text by being more concise, keyword-focused • *If your CMS doesn’t encode special characters, omit the double quote (") – it’ll truncate tag text in the HTML code • *If your CMS reuses <title> text for friendly URLs (fURLs), keep fURLs clean by not using the following in <title> text: non-English letters (such as the accented é) or these special characters <>{}[]():;'"/|&?@$#%,^+=!* The following characters are OK -_.~ Also, don’t use Microsoft Word with Autocorrect enabled to write page metadata – it substitutes special characters like curly quotes and dashes, which have to be percent-encoded in URLs 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 13
  • 14. <title> tag text: well-optimized example <title> tag text How this will appear in a SERP: <title> tag text 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 14
  • 15. <title> tag text: room for improvement <title> tag text How this will appear in a SERP: 10/15/2013 <title> tag text Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 15
  • 16. <meta> description tag The elevator pitch for your page in search
  • 17. <meta> description tag Purpose • Quick synopsis of what the searcher can expect to find on the page • The primary intent is to convert a SERP impression into a click • Not used for keyword relevance by search • Query word(s) are automatically bolded within the SERPs for added visibility Best Practices • Ensure text length is between 120-160 characters, including spaces • Add the description text to every content page of the site • Write a unique description for each page – no boilerplate duplicates across a department • Write the text for humans in compelling, descriptive and actionable language • *If your CMS doesn’t encode special characters, don’t use the double quote character (") in this text – use single quote (') if necessary – it’ll truncate the tag text in the HTML code 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 17
  • 18. <meta> description tag text: well-optimized example How this will appear in a SERP: 10/15/2013 <meta> description text Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 18
  • 19. <meta> description tag text: room for improvement How this will appear in a SERP: <meta> description text 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 19
  • 20. <h1> tag The visible, on-page headline that describes the content
  • 21. <h1> tag Purpose • The visible, on-page headline defining the content of the page • Similar to a newspaper article headline, this text provides significant keyword relevance for the page to search engines • Heading tags, such as <h1>, <h2>, and so on, were developed for formatting, but CSS has replaced them for formatting, and search engines interpret them as data tags that provide concise descriptions for pages, or sections of a page. Best Practices • Use relevant keywords found in the body text relating to the theme or subject of the page content • When possible, do not use an exact copy of the <title> tag text. Differentiate the headline text by using a variant of the <title> tag text’s keyword phrase or use alternative, related words taken from the body text • Ensure text length is between 10-200 characters, including spaces 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 21
  • 22. <h1> tag text: well-optimized example The well-optimized <h1> tag text includes related keywords from the <title> tag. This helps with categorizing and ranking for keywords. <h1> tag text: love: friendship, dating, sex &amp; marriage <title> tag text: Relationship and Dating Advice for Women and Men - MSN Living 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 22
  • 23. <h1> tag text: room for improvement The <h1> tag text is a direct duplicate of the <title> tag (with site branding added) and lacks any clear relevance to the content found on the page. <h1> tag text: Plum crazy <title> tag text: Plum crazy - MSN Living 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 23
  • 24. <img> alt text The text content that describes a digital image
  • 25. <img> alt text Purpose • Describes content of digital images in text form for search engines to consume • Provides significant keyword relevance for the page to search engines Best Practices • Write using natural language. The text need not be a complete sentence nor are ending periods needed, but it shouldn’t be merely a list of keywords • Write the image description in context to the content theme of the page • Use relevant keywords found in the body text • Put the core keyword phrase toward the start of the text for strongest relevance • Put copyright and photographer/agency attribution information, if used, at the end • Ensure text length is between 25-150 characters, including spaces • If your CMS doesn’t encode special characters, don’t use the double quote character (") in this text – use single quote (') if necessary – it’ll truncate the tag text in the HTML code 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 25
  • 26. <img> alt text: well-optimized example Alt text used: “Florida lizards: A young tegu lizard is held by Jake Edwards, a wildlife technician for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.” 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 26
  • 27. <img> alt text: room for improvement Existing alt text: Better optimized alt text: “&quot;Plum Crazy&quot; CLINIQUE” “Clinique Chubby Stick Lip Colour Balm in Voluptuous Violet” 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 27
  • 28. Body text with inline links The meat of the story and links to more information
  • 29. Body text with inline links Purpose • Body text, written in clear ASCII text, not displayed via JavaScript, AJAX, Flash, Silverlight, video or in images, is what search engine crawlers read to determine the subject of the page • An inline link used in body text further develops the concepts on the page by referring the reader to another, related page (optimally within the site) using a relevant keyword phrase for the target page as link text • Search engines see inline links as benefitting human readers and generally regard links as endorsements of the target page Best Practices • Ensure there is a bare minimum 125 non-linked words in the body text section of an article page or on the first slide of a single URL gallery. Optimally, 250+ non-linked words is a much better minimum to develop search engine relevance • In galleries that do not change the URL as they advance through the images, each subsequent slide also needs body text, but a minimum of a couple descriptive sentences is usually sufficient. More is better, however • Only link to pages that are relevant to the content of the page containing the link • Ensure hyperlink text is relevant to the target page, as they are keyword(s) for that page. Do NOT use “click here” or “more” as link text • The most effective links for SEO purposes are those found within the first ~150 words of body text 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 29
  • 30. <meta> news_keywords The key to indexation in Google News
  • 31. <meta> news_keywords tag Purpose • Identifies additional keyword relevancy of page content to Google News • Is supplemental to other important keyword relevance tags: <title>, <h1>, <img> alt text • Helps Google understand the story’s theme when the headline is unclear or ambiguous • Only applicable to sites accepted into and pages indexed in Google News, not Google web index or Bing Best Practices • Think about the keywords and phrases you would use in a query to search for the article in Google • Develop a list of target keyword phrases for the content page • Add up to maximum of 10 keyword phrases for a given page, optimally between 3-5 words long • Think in terms of people, places and event names as good candidate keyword phrases • Generally avoid single keywords, as they are usually too broad to specifically target the subject of a post • Don’t repeat exact keyword phrases used in <title>, <h1> or <img> alt text; it is better to develop other keywords • Use commas only to separate each keyword phrase (don’t use commas for any other reason, as in formatting large numbers like “5,000”, or in adjective lists, as in “big, red dog”) • Omit all other punctuation, such as periods (as in Dr. or Calif.), quotes, dashes, etc. • All keyword phrases are given equal value; position in this tag doesn’t matter • As case doesn’t matter, stick to using all lower-case letters in keyword phrases 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 31
  • 32. <meta> news_keywords: well-optimized example <meta> news_keywords tag content: 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 32
  • 33. Social media for content The rising gauge on how search measures popularity
  • 34. Social media for content Purpose • Exposes content to users of other sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, etc., that then drives page views and links back to your site • Social is the new link building audience-building methodology Best Practices • Use social media to announce and update breaking news stories • Use social to link to evergreen stories that have become newsworthy and relevant again • Republish social media posts later in the day for major feature stories or those that remain highly relevant to daily events • Retweet received messages that mention your content in a positive light • Establish a consistent daily cadence of social posts • Promote newly produced content and related evergreen content • Consider using post scheduling automation and efficiency tools and services such as HootSuite and Bit.ly 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 34
  • 35. Social media & audience building Share compelling content on social networks and blogs Google and Bing will see the links and add value to your content, giving a boost in the rankings for a page 10/15/2013 The larger the audience for a piece of content = more links to your content Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 35
  • 36. Influence of social media on search ranking • Studies show that URLs receive a significant boost in Google rankings when they are shared on Twitter • The benefits of this boost seem to level out at around 50 tweets, and the subsequent benefit of gaining additional tweets is minimal until around 5,000 tweets • After 5,000 tweets, the average ranking of URLs improves considerably • URLs receiving over 7,500 tweets almost always rank inside the top 5 results • Average rankings are heavily correlated to the number of tweets about each URL 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 36
  • 37. Google Authorship Markup Help Google identify YOU as an expert on the topics you know best
  • 38. What is Google Authorship Markup? It’s Google’s method to attribute author credit to original, expert content. With GAM enabled, the Google web SERPs use rich snippets to show additional author info, including a head shot photo and a link to more content by the author. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 38
  • 39. Requirements & methods • A verified digital identify, owned by Google (a personal Google+ profile), that links out to your published content • Your published content needs to reference you as the sole author in a byline (multiple-author content is not yet supported) and link back to your verified Google+ profile (make sure your byline name exactly matches your name used in your Google+ profile) • Google supports 4 methods of verifying that trust:  a 3-link method  a 2-link method  <link> tag in source code  an email verification method (Google’s preferred method) 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 39
  • 40. Email verification method The email verification method can be used when the author can’t edit the content page author bio content. 1. The author byline links to an email address using the same root domain name as the content page. 2. That email address is registered and verified in the author’s Google+ profile. 10/15/2013 Note: This scenario can be used anytime an email address link is used in the author byline. Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 40
  • 41. Set up your personal Google+ profile If you have a Gmail account, you have a Google+ profile. Otherwise, create one at plus.google.com. First, edit your profile and select a head shot photo to add. No animals, cartoons, art or abstract designs. Just a facial photo of you. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 41
  • 42. Set up your personal Google+ profile Enable +1s: Add links to your other online profiles: 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 42
  • 43. Set up your personal Google+ profile • Consider adding information about your occupation, employment, and other pertinent professional information related to your areas of expertise. These are not required for authorship markup, but they can often contribute an added degree of authority to an author. • When you finish editing and saving the profile updates, copy the 21-digit number of the Google+ profile URL. • Leave the browser tab open. You’re not done yet. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 43
  • 44. Set up email verification sites Browse to the Google+ page titled, Link your Google+ profile to the content you create. 1. Sign in to Google (if not already so) 2. Add the email address used in your content’s byline link 3. Click Signup for Authorship 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 44
  • 45. Set up email verification sites Click the link in the Google verification email you’ll receive. Once verified, the email address will then be automatically added to your Google+ profile. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 45
  • 46. WordPress challenges • WordPress strips out all anchor tag attributes. There are workarounds, but be wary of the plug-in suggested by Google. It’s universally applicable (easy for Google), but it’s potentially unsafe (bad for the site owner). • For most users, if the email method is not usable, the next best approach in WordPress is to use the 2-link method with a link to the author’s Google+ profile in the author bio snippet using ?rel=author. <a href="https://plus.google.com/ 123456789012345678901?rel=author">Google+</a> • For more details on setting up Google Authorship Markup in WordPress, see The Definitive Guide to Google Authorship Markup article in Search Engine Land. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 46
  • 47. Validate the markup code If you didn’t use the email verification method but instead used markup code, you need to validate the code with Google to be sure everything was done right. Browse to the Structured Data Testing Tool (www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets), then have Google validate the markup code on your content page URLs (as well as your author bio page URL, if used) 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 47
  • 48. Validate the markup code For 3-link and 2-link methods, you should see test results similar to this (the email method was verified by the submission form): 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 48
  • 49. Google Authorship Markup wrap up • TIP: If your site also uses Google’s <link> rel=publisher code, it apparently interferes with rel=author functionality in the SERPs, so only use rel=publisher code on the site’s home page. • Authorship markup helps Google identify the original source of published content. If Google judges the content as high quality, the author of that topic can also earn “author rank,” which may positively influence the ranking of future posts by the same author on the same topic. • The author identification in the SERP will likely positively influence click-through rates for that listing, which is especially important for results ranked lower that #1. • Employing Google Authorship Markup can only benefit good authors who are experts in their subject areas. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 49
  • 50. Keyword research tools Identify which words hold the most power in search
  • 51. Keyword research tools There are numerous keyword research tools that can help uncover the words people use most often in search. Let’s take a look at some of the most commonly used and popular choices. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 51
  • 52. Predictive search In both Google and Bing
  • 53. Predictive search How to use predictive search in Google and Bing www.google.com or www.bing.com • Start typing your core keyword phrase to see the results Predictive search shows what terms are being searched at the moment. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 53
  • 54. Google Trends Mine Google for historical trend data of hot search topics
  • 55. Google Trends Hot Searches Hot searches - http://www.google.com/trends/hottrends Google Trends Hot Searches uses real time data to show which topics have jumped significantly in traffic. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 55
  • 56. Google Trends Top Charts Hot searches - http://www.google.com/trends/topcharts Google Trends Top Charts shows people, places and things with high, overall monthly search traffic going back to 2004. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 56
  • 57. Google Trends Explore Explore Trends - http://www.google.com/trends/explore Google Trends Explore adds access to deeper levels of search trends data, based on specific words, categories, trends over time, in specific markets, etc. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 57
  • 58. Google Trends Explore Note that you can explore search trends for one or more specific words and phrases, and then drill down to get greater specificity with filters covering: • countries • dates • categories • specific Google search indexes 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 58
  • 59. Google Trends Explore Location filters allow for country-wide drill downs in most locations, but for US searches, you can actually drill down by state, and even by major metro areas within a state. 10/15/2013 Date filters allow for drill downs for the past week, month, quarter, year, a specific year, or a custom date of your choosing. Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 59
  • 60. Google Trends Explore Category filters allow for topic drill downs, and many have secondary and tertiary categories. Categories can be helpful in specifying the meaning of an ambiguous term. 10/15/2013 While most people use web search most often, the other search indexes contain specific types of information, and these can be specified for Trends data. Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 60
  • 61. Google Trends Explore Google Trends Explore adds access to deeper levels of search trends data, based on specific words, categories, trends over time, in specific markets, etc. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 61
  • 62. Google Trends Explore Google Trends Explore presents search trend data, detailing the amount of traffic over time, regional and metro traffic sources, and related search terms. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 62
  • 63. Google Trends Explore You can further dig into your keyword research by comparing search terms, search traffic by locations, or search traffic over separate time slices. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 63
  • 64. Google Trends Explore Secret to Success: Get much more useful data by downloading the report as a CSV from Google (you must be logged in first!). Additional downloaded data includes: • Searcher interest over time for each keyword phrase (on a weekly basis) • Top subregions for each keyword phrase (in the US, numbers provided by state) • Top cities for each keyword phrase (when data is available) • Top 20 keyword phrases (rather than just the top 10 as shown in the webpage) 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 64
  • 65. Google Keyword Planner Tool Let Google help identify the best words to use in content
  • 66. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool Next, take your list of keyword ideas and stack rank them further with the Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool: https://adwords.google.com/ko/KeywordPlanner/Home About the newest keyword research tool from Google: • • • The old Google AdWords Keyword Tool was shut down in the summer of 2013 by Google, replaced with Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool The new tool is primarily designed to help plan Pay-Per-Click (PPC) search ad campaigns However, we can make it work for SEO keyword research Note: You will need a Google account login to use this tool. Your Gmail account login should suffice. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 66
  • 67. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool There are 4 ways to use the tool. For keyword research for SEO, you’ll primarily use Search for new keyword and ad group ideas. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 67
  • 68. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool • Add your keywords to the box labeled Your product or service. • Under Targeting, set the option to your site’s intended market (you can get quite specific in the US). • Add any Negative keywords (words you don’t want in your keyword ideas list). • Under Keyword options, choose between broad or closely related keyword ideas. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 68
  • 69. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool The tool will generate a list of ideas based on the seed ideas you give it. The Ad Group ideas tab contains keyword ideas by categories. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 69
  • 70. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool The Keywords ideas tab contains all of the individual keywords in a single list. Click the column header Avg. monthly searches to sort them high-to-low. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 70
  • 71. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool Note you can alter the way the tool works with keyword ideas. By default, broad match is used, but you can tighten up the results if you are looking for specific context. You can directly edit keywords on the tool’s command line, including the individual match type. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 71
  • 72. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool Here are the Google Keyword Planner Tool match type definitions. You’ll typically use broad match to get the most results, but here’s what the others match types do. Match type Special symbol Example keyword(s) Ads may show on searches that Example keywords included Broad match none women's hats include misspellings, synonyms, related searches, and other relevant variations buy ladies hats, womens caps, hats for girls, womans hats, Buy red hats for women Broad match modifier Phrase match +keyword "keyword" +women's +hats "women's hats" contain the modified term (or close variations, but not synonyms), in any order are a phrase, and close variations of that phrase women's hats, buy women's hats, Hats for women But excludes: helmets for women, women's visors women's hats, buy women's hats, woman's hats, Women's hats But excludes: girls hats, womens baseball hats women's hats, woman's hats Exact match [keyword] [women's hats] are an exact term and close variations of that exact term But excludes: buy women's hats, women's hats on sale women's hats, sun hats Negative match -keyword 10/15/2013 -baseball are searches without the term But excludes: baseball hats, baseball caps Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 72
  • 73. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool If you already know your list of keywords and just want to check the search volume for each, use Get search volume for a list of keywords or group them into ad groups. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 73
  • 74. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool You can add your list of specific keyword phrases to check to the list (either on separate lines or separated by commas) or upload a CSV file containing those keyword phrases. Click Get search volume to generate the list. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 74
  • 75. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool On the resulting page, click Keyword ideas tab to see the resulting data. Click Avg. monthly searches to sort by search volume. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 75
  • 76. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool For keyword mash-ups, you might try Multiply keyword lists to get new keyword ideas. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 76
  • 77. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool You can add specific items to one list and then add relevant modifiers to the other to create the mash-up list. Note that the mash-ups are concatenated in the order you present them in the lists. Click Get search volume to generate the mash-up list. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 77
  • 78. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool On the resulting page, click Keyword ideas tab to see the resulting mash-ups. Click Avg. monthly searches to sort by search volume. 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 78
  • 79. Google AdWords Keyword Planner Tool Secret to Success: Get much more useful data by downloading the report as a CSV from Google. Be sure to select Segment statistics by month. Additional data includes: • Google search traffic per month for the past 12 months • Competition data in detail (rather than high, medium or low) 10/15/2013 Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 79
  • 80. More information on me Rick DeJarnette is the sole in-house SEO for all US channels in MSN.com. He’s published original blog posts about SEO in Search Engine Land, Internet Marketing Ninjas, The SEO Ace and Bing Webmaster Center. Rick can be found online at: rick@theseoace.com @rickdejarnette 10/15/2013 LinkedIn Google+ Presented by Rick DeJarnette — The SEO Ace (www.theseoace.com) 80
  • 81. Thank you!