The role of DPULOs - presentation from CCIL CEO Lynne Turnbull
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The role of DPULOs - presentation from CCIL CEO Lynne Turnbull

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Presentation given by Lynne Turnbull - CEO of Cheshire CIL and a Strengthening DPULOs Programme Ambassador - at a recent Capita conference on the role of DPULOs.

Presentation given by Lynne Turnbull - CEO of Cheshire CIL and a Strengthening DPULOs Programme Ambassador - at a recent Capita conference on the role of DPULOs.

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  • [20 minutes max presentation plus 10 mins questions]
  • Good Afternoon, My name is Lynne Turnbull, I am the Chief Executive Officer at Cheshire Centre for Independent Living. I will be referring to Disabled People’s User Led Organisations which I will be referring to throughout this presentation as [ acronym ] DPULO’s otherwise I will be here all afternoon! Cheshire Centre for Independent Living is a DPULO and I will be covering their role in support planning and brokerage but firstly will be covering the role of a DPULO more broadly and how they can impact positively in this economic climate that has been a reoccurring theme throughout the day so far.
  • At the end of 2007 Putting People First highlighted the importance of independent support services for people navigating through the care and support system, irrespective of their eligibility for public funding. As a result it included the requirement for at least one local DPULO per area alongside support for universal mechanisms to develop networks that ensure people using services and their families have a collective voice, influencing policy and provision. This policy support remains in place through the Governments Capable Communities, Active Citizens adult social care vision and the joint agreement across a number of social care organisations, Think Local Act Personal. A DPULO has a t least 75% of Management Board as disabled people, at least 50% of staff are disabled people, at least 50% of volunteers are disabled people and we work within the ethos of the social model of disability. Or A DPULO can demonstrate a commitment to working towards this criteria.   DPULO’s promote independent living, human and legal rights and engage with all disabled people, carers and other people who use services. DPULO’s can operate on both the demand side (ie providing the individual and collective voice of and for the direct experiences of disabled people, carers and people who use services), and the supply side (ie providing services to meet the needs and wants of disabled people). A DPULO may offer a one stop shop approach with all services under one roof, or they may be consortiums/partnerships, or several DPULO’s in one location each providing a specific service. DPULO’s supporting independent living may offer Information and advice Advocacy and Peer Support Support using Personal Budgets and Direct Payments Support using Personal Health Budgets Assistance with self assessment or support planning Support to recruit and employ PAs Disability Equality Training Support the implementation of the Disability Equality Duty by Public Sector organisations in the local area
  • Cheshire Centre for Independent Living has been established since 1992, providing a range of support services, driven by the needs and aspirations of disabled people. We are underpinned by the principles of the ‘social model of disability’, which means when we talk about ‘disabled’ people, we mean how society disables us with ‘disabling’ attitudes and barriers that excludes us whatever our impairment. Our Vision is to eradicate inequality for local disabled people. Our Mission to empower local disabled people to have independence, choice and control over their lives and to remove the barriers that exist within society.
  • If I was a commissioner, I'd be asking how can I do more, and how can I get more for less! DPULO’s offer a solution:- They do not have multiple office bases and are often small organisations with significantly smaller overheads than public sector.   For every £1 invested in a DPULO, evidence shows a Return on Investment of circa £3.     Article 19 regulations of the Procurement Directive 2004/18/EC form a part of European legislation that allows organisations to reserve public contracts for supported businesses. A supported business employs disabled people as over 50% of its workforce. For contracts under £144k, it is therefore permitted to invite only supported businesses – such as a local DPULO – to bid for a contract or offer them the chance to match the best price. This article can save commissioners valuable time and cost; whilst allowing smaller DPULO’s to deliver vital services.   DPULO’s offer cost savings to Authorities through added-value services that are not funded through a contract, yet, support the authority to meet their duties and/or objectives; i.e. engagement with disabled people or supporting the uptake of Direct Payments.
  • Why should I, in the Public Sector, engage with a DPULO? The Public Sector have a duty through the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) to ensure that disabled people are treated fairly. This can be achieved by working with disabled people when designing policies, services or communications. DPULOs represent an embedded and efficient way of delivering the “duty to involve” and are a readymade vehicle for delivering transformation through coproduction. DPULO’s have legitimacy both with users and Commissioners as the ‘voice’ of disabled people . There is clear evidence that better outcomes are achieved when disabled people are supported via a DPULO through a peer to peer approach. DPULO have legitimacy with both service users and commissioners, have a person centred approach and have a wealth of skills, knowledge and expertise of the lived experience of disabled people. In addition, DPULO’s are involved in a range of policy areas and not just adult social care :- Local Healthwatch. The most recent health white paper proposes retaining the role and function of LINks under the new name of healthwatch. This presents plenty of opportunity for DPULO’s to engage and drive the continuing work for integrated health and social care. Access to Work. The Sayce Review noted that DPULO’s can play a significant role in building awareness of Access to Work and supporting both employees and employers alike in accessing Access to Work and so supporting the employment of disabled people.     Hate Crime. This is a significant issue affecting disabled peoples lives. DPULOs have been highlighted as one potential way of supporting disabled people to report hate crime and well as increasing the understanding of hate crime as an issue and working in partnership with organisations such as the police. (government’s hate crime action plan) Big Society. As civil society organisations run by and for their members and clients, DPULO’s can contribute to the overarching agenda created by Big Society. Through enabling peer to peer support for disabled people in their local communities, DPULO are extremely well placed to facilitate citizen contributions to the Big Society agenda. Specific Capacity Building funding available for DPULO’s in your area through the Strengthening DPULO’s programme, launched by Maria Miller, Minister for Disabled People in July 2011, to encourage sustainability for DPULO’s.
  • As a result, DPULO’s are a great vehicle for providing high quality independent, impartial advice and advocacy that can support with the reviewing of local processes and policies, reporting of disability hate crime, uptake of access to work and ensuring that disabled people are able to make informed choices about their care and support needs. Personalisation is supposed to be about control, choice and independence. However, it is clear that some barriers still need to be overcome with innovative solutions that challenge existing systems and processes, attitudes to risk and cultures that support the status quo. It is important to note that [ as already mentioned this morning ] Personalisation is not just about Personal Budgets or indeed a Direct Payment, but it is clear that this is high on the Government agenda and is not going to go away. The Vision for Social Care: 100% take up by 2013 and more recently with Personal Health Budgets: 100% take up over 5 years for people in receipt of Continuing Healthcare. Putting People First and Think Local Act Personal promotes Personal Budgets and Direct Payments as a Local Authority first offer and recognises that there is a higher take up of Direct Payments when a User Led Organisation modeled on a Centre for Independent Living delivers a support service. Disabled people should be at the heart of decision making about the services they use ‘Nothing about me, Without me’ and one of the ways of achieving this, is to invest in user-led organisations which can participate in support planning, brokerage and delivery.     Cheshire Centre for Independent Living services are modelled along the lines of a ‘Centre for Independent/ Integrated/ Inclusive Living’. We give impartial technical advice and support to people directing their own care through a Personal Budget or Personal Health Budget, and also offer an online recruitment tool for Individual Employers and Personal Assistants, a Payroll service, Managed Bank Account service, Training for Individual Employers and their Personal Assistants, Advocacy and Peer Support. [We also support disabled young people to access universal services and facilitate short breaks for their parents]. Cheshire Centre for Independent Living support people to make informed choices about their care needs and wants and for example, provide information on services/providers within the market or about their responsibilities if they want to consider employing a Personal Assistant, so that disabled people can make decisions and informed choices about what’s important to them and how best to meet their own needs. In an increasing American culture of ‘where there’s blame there’s claim’ Cheshire Centre for Independent Living’s support, particularly to those employing their own staff, around recruitment and selection and the complexities of employment law can minimise risks/employment tribunals. Because of the peer to peer approach, and engagement with disabled people, Cheshire Centre for Independent Living have been successful in identifying gaps in service provision and considering ways to address these barriers, whether that be informing local authorities about the lack of market for people to spend their Personal Budget or developing independent services to open doors for more disabled people to be able to direct their own care.
  • An example I would like to share with you about identifying gaps and finding solutions are specifically around the employment of personal assistants. A recent DEMOS research concluded that a significantly high number of people want a Personal Assistant but are still not being given the option of a direct payment as part of their Personal Budget. This reiterates the need for high quality independent and impartial advice for all disabled people to ensure that people can make an informed choice and supports the need for earlier intervention from support services in support planning and managing risk/supporting risk taking as part of everyday life. Cheshire Centre for Independent Living consulted with disabled people around the barriers to accessing a Direct Payment to employ their own staff.    The main barriers identified by respondents were: 34% Recruitment of a Personal Assistant 29% Learning/Training needs 29% Paperwork requirements
  • Collaborative working with a range of partners and disabled people is imperative and at the heart of innovation, to ensure that solutions to barriers are equally person-centred and not a decision made on someone behalf. As part of collaborative working, Cheshire Centre for Independent Living form part of the Local Adult Safeguarding Board. It is a priority of the Board to include service users, carers and the public in the work it’s doing to keep people safe. Therefore, Cheshire Centre for Independent Living both established and chairs a ‘No Secrets’ Service User Reference Group, “Stopping Adult Abuse – Everyone’s Business”. This group determines the way that Adult Social Services and partners work with its service users, carers & the public. Information and advice from our service users helps to improve the Safeguarding Adults process and policy development.   Many of Cheshire Centre for Independent Living’s innovative solutions to barriers, as best practice examples, were cited within the Department of Health ‘Working for Personalised Care’, a framework for supporting Personal Assistants working in Adult Social Care. Revisiting the barriers, in the previous slide, this is how we addressed the barriers disabled people identified to employing personal assistants. To address the recruitment barrier, Cheshire Centre for Independent Living, in partnership with people using services and Age UK Cheshire, developed the North West Personal Assistant Register , an online recruitment tool where disabled people and personal assistants, can find the Right people or Right Jobs in One place. This has enabled disabled people to take direct control over the recruitment of Personal Assistants and communicate with potential employees through a safe and secure two-way communication tool. In order to remove the paperwork barrier Cheshire Centre for Independent Living developed a Managed Bank Account Service to support disabled people to continue to achieve their outcomes from accessing a direct payment without the paperwork burden.   
  • In 2009, Cheshire Centre for Independent Living established an award winning learning service that enables access to free, independent, tailor-made learning and development opportunities for individual employers and their Personal Assistants (PAs) around health and safety, communication and safeguarding. In 99% of cases, are requested and accessed in the employers home/personal assistant workplace. Cheshire Centre for Independent Living were really proud to have been announced as Winners of a Skills for Care Accolade 2010 and 2011/12 for contribution to workforce development for social care, for our Individual Employer and Personal Assistant Learning/Training service. The verifier said:-   “ Cheshire Centre for Independent Living (CCIL) provides a very personal learning and development service to direct employers and personal assistants. The employer is the expert and so their journey is one where they are in control with CCIL providing support. CCIL have ensured training providers adopt their person centered ethos and offer creative and personal training and learning opportunities. CCIL pave the way for employers and personal assistants to have tailored, high quality training which is in the context of their environment and individual needs. This has led to direct employers understanding of the world of employment and having a safe, competent and caring personal assistant workforce”. In addition to this personalised, tailor-made approach to learning and development; CCIL, in partnership with Skills for Care have developed the ‘PA Apprenticeship Pilot Project’ which includes provision for 11 PAs to access the Apprenticeship framework in their role supporting disabled people who are also individual employers. You may think that this innovative solution to learning/training for individual employers and personal assistants is more costly than traditional alternatives; however, evidence shows that we have been able to source Independent Training Providers for circa 50% of the like-for-like cost to Authorities. In addition, these combined innovative approaches alone, demonstrate savings in cost benefit in excess of £150k per Local Authority area. To conclude, DPULO’s are not intended to be a replacement for other expertise, however, there is clear evidence that better outcomes are achieved when disabled people are supported via a DPULO with a peer to peer approach; there is greater reporting of disability hate crime when a DPULO is involved and greater uptake of Personal Budgets and Direct Payments when supported by a DPULO to make informed decisions and choices. In addition, procurement legislation Article 19 enables commissioners to support local DPULO’s sustainability whilst saving time and money in the lengthy and costly procurement process. DPULO’s offer Innovative yet Cost effective solutions.   More for less a reality?..... YES!
  • Question/Discussion Time. Please tell your local DPULO’s about the non financial and financial resources available to them through the Strengthening DPULO programme. To conclude, DPULO’s are not intended to be a replacement for other expertise, however, there is clear evidence that better outcomes are achieved when disabled people are supported via a DPULO with a peer to peer approach; there is greater reporting of disability hate crime when a DPULO is involved and greater uptake of Personal Budgets and Direct Payments when supported by a DPULO to make informed decisions and choices. In addition, procurement legislation Article 19 enables commissioners to support local DPULO’s sustainability whilst saving time and money in the lengthy and costly procurement process. DPULO’s offer Innovative yet Cost effective solutions.   More for less a reality?..... YES!

The role of DPULOs - presentation from CCIL CEO Lynne Turnbull The role of DPULOs - presentation from CCIL CEO Lynne Turnbull Presentation Transcript

  • The Role of Disabled Peoples User-Led Organisations (DPULO’s) 27th March 2012 Lynne Turnbull, Chief Executive Officer Cheshire Centre for Independent Living
  • Overview What is a DPULO Challenges for Commissioners > More for Less Benefits of Engaging with Disabled Peoples User Led Organisations (DPULO’s) DPULO Provision Identifying Gaps in Provision and Developing Innovative Solutions Questions / Discussion Time
  • What is a DPULO? At least 75% of Management Board are disabled people At least 50% of staff are disabled people At least 50% of volunteers are disabled people Works within the ethos of the social model of disabilityOr Working towards the above
  • About UsCheshire Centre for Independent Living has beenestablished since 1992, providing a range of supportservices, driven by the needs and aspirations of disabledpeople.Our VisionTo eradicate inequality for local disabled people.Our MissionTo empower local disabled people to have independence,choice and control over their lives and to remove thebarriers that exist within society.
  • More for Less Unit Costs are less > Not big overheads Investment > Return on Investment EU Legislation: Article 19 > Saves time and money and enables smaller DPULO’s to deliver services Value added Services > Achievement of Outcomes
  • Benefits of DPULOEngagement Public Sector Equality Duty Duty to Engage with disabled people ‘Voice’ of disabled people Person-Centred Working Work across more than one policy area Peer to Peer approach Legitimacy both with Service Users and Commissioners Experience, skills and knowledge Identifying gaps and finding solutions Evidence of better outcomes for disabled people
  • DPULO Provision Information, Advice and Advocacy Review Local Processes/ Policy Access to Work Disability Hate Crime Adult Social Care and Health - Personal Budgets: everyone eligible to be in receipt by 2013 - Personal Health Budgets: 100% take up over 5 years? - Support Planning Service Delivery
  • Identifying Gaps
  • Developing InnovativeSolutions North West Personal Assistant Register Managed Bank Account Service Personal Assistant Training Individual Employer Training Collaborative Working
  • Conclusion More for Less.... A Reality?
  • Questions Thank you for Listening.
  • Contact DetailsE-mail: lynne.turnbull@cheshirecil.orgWebsite: www.cheshirecil.org www.nw-pa.orgSocial Media:www.twitter.com/cheshirecil #dpulowww.facebook.com/cheshirecentreforindependentlivingwww.facebook.com/dpulos
  • References (info only) Improving the Life Chances of Disabled People Report (2005) Putting People First Concordat (2007) Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act [Section 138 (1)] (2007) Personalisation: A Rough Guide (2008) Transforming Social Care (2008 & 2009) Right to Control Trailblazers (2009) A Vision for Social Care: Capable Communities, Active Citizens (2010) Think Local Act Personal (2010)