“Remember you?  You saved my      life!”  An introduction to Leap Confronting Conflict                 October 2011       ...
In this presentation•   Who Leap reaches•   Leap’s recent track record•   Leap’s work•   Leap’s response to the riots•   F...
Who Leap reaches• Leap helps young people aged 11-25 to  manage and reduce conflict in their lives to  prevent it from esc...
Who Leap reachesChallenges young people face todayIssues facing young people                    ScaleYP in criminal justic...
Leap’s recent track record2009• Awarded Charity of the Year at Charity Awards2010• After just one year, violent crime by g...
Leap’s recent track recordIn 2011 our work has included• developing a collaborative response to the riots• sustained work ...
What is our work?• Workshops use interactive exercises: group  learning, role-play – simple models that help  participants...
What is our work?“I know I will take what I have learnt with me through life”                                             ...
Leap’s worka. Early intervention: typically in schools associated with   violenceb. Tackling stubborn levels of public vio...
Responding to the riots• Aftermath dominated by knee-jerk reactions• Our response: work with young people, our  expert tra...
Find out morewww.leapcc.org.ukhttp://twitter.com/leap_ccrichard.sved@leapcc.org.uk020 7561 3700                           ...
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Introduction to Leap Confronting Conflict

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  • Thanks for meeting, introductions etcReference to recent conversation with TomL, “come back if you need more support” – want to tell you where we are, what our current needs are
  • These facts indicate the scale of the challenges facing young people:Young people in the criminal justice system: 70% reoffending rates – our work in Chelmsford ... Those at the top age range need much more help as they are offered very little from the YJB.Gangs need coordinated comprehensive response – like the work we have already done in ScotlandEmployment is one of the most important aspects for young people – it is one of the most fulfilling ways to prevent offending, tackle poverty, build experience, yet the UK’s got a big problem with unemployed young people with little or no access to training or educationThe England-wide riots will see a lot of young people get a custodial sentence – and those young people will need different support than the older offenders But this is a window to influence the UK’s policy response
  • in 2011 our work has includeddeveloping a collaborative response to the riots, as outlined elsewhere in this documentsustained work in Chelmsford prison, the preliminary results of which have highlighted an increase in young people going into education, a decrease in assaults on staff, a reduction in the severity of incidents, a reduction in the use of segregation, and 61% fewer adjudications.
  • We need to spend a bit more time on this slide to set up the rest.We chose these as our focuses because it is where Leap can have the greatest sustainable impact – lasting change for young people and their communities. Impetus support for the strategic planning.Talk about impact on employability, race, gender, identity as a key focus for all of our workAlso talk about how we need to involve young people in all aspects of our work – development, design, evaluation, stakeholder communications
  • At Leap Confronting Conflict, we were dismayed to watch the August disturbances unfold across England. We are leading experts in youth and conflict, with a strong track record of pioneering work with young people in communities affected by gang violence. We help them to understand and manage the everyday conflict in their lives.  We were concerned that the aftermath of the disturbances was dominated by knee-jerk reactions, rather than considered, collaborative responses. So we immediately started working with young people, our expert trainers, and like-minded organisations.  At Leap we are harnessing this collective expertise across nearly 30 organisations in the criminal justice and youth sectors to draw up a constructive and sustainable programme of local activity. We want to repair the damage done to the relationships that make up each community, building capacity to prevent violence escalating. Through all of this, we need to ensure that the voices of young people continue to be heard as part of any response. If Rotary Clubs want to know more about Leap’s progress and how they can help, please contact Richard Sved on 020 7561 3700 or richard.sved@leapcc.org.uk.
  • At Leap Confronting Conflict, we were dismayed to watch the August disturbances unfold across England. We are leading experts in youth and conflict, with a strong track record of pioneering work with young people in communities affected by gang violence. We help them to understand and manage the everyday conflict in their lives.  We were concerned that the aftermath of the disturbances was dominated by knee-jerk reactions, rather than considered, collaborative responses. So we immediately started working with young people, our expert trainers, and like-minded organisations.  At Leap we are harnessing this collective expertise across nearly 30 organisations in the criminal justice and youth sectors to draw up a constructive and sustainable programme of local activity. We want to repair the damage done to the relationships that make up each community, building capacity to prevent violence escalating. Through all of this, we need to ensure that the voices of young people continue to be heard as part of any response. If Rotary Clubs want to know more about Leap’s progress and how they can help, please contact Richard Sved on 020 7561 3700 or richard.sved@leapcc.org.uk.
  • Introduction to Leap Confronting Conflict

    1. 1. “Remember you? You saved my life!” An introduction to Leap Confronting Conflict October 2011 1
    2. 2. In this presentation• Who Leap reaches• Leap’s recent track record• Leap’s work• Leap’s response to the riots• Find out more 2
    3. 3. Who Leap reaches• Leap helps young people aged 11-25 to manage and reduce conflict in their lives to prevent it from escalating to violence.• Leap works with young people whose lives are often chaotic and volatile to become role models and leaders of change within their communities.• Leap targets areas with high levels of youth violence and crime 3
    4. 4. Who Leap reachesChallenges young people face todayIssues facing young people ScaleYP in criminal justice system 2075 <18 in system; 10,369 18-20 (2011)Gangs & territorialism 70+ YP died in gangs; 170+ gangs in UK, (2008)Racial conflict, gender & cultural identityNEET and alternative education 938,000 16 to 24yr DWP (2011)Bullying and poor school behaviour 69% children report bullying 87% parents report child bullied (2006)England-wide riots 1,566 suspects have now appeared in court, 21% were under 18 (2011)Lack of emotional development 4
    5. 5. Leap’s recent track record2009• Awarded Charity of the Year at Charity Awards2010• After just one year, violent crime by gang members in Glasgow almost halved, after Leap training for adult support workers.• 17 of 23 young offenders who took part in ‘Fear and Fashion’ programme stopped or reduced offending behaviour.• After only four months of Leap training young people and practitioners, there were 53% fewer incidents of anti-social behaviour in Enfield. 5
    6. 6. Leap’s recent track recordIn 2011 our work has included• developing a collaborative response to the riots• sustained work in Chelmsford prison, the preliminary results of which have highlighted an increase in young people going into education, a decrease in assaults on staff, a reduction in the severity of incidents, a reduction in the use of segregation and 61% fewer adjudications• work in Bexley schools on issues of identity and belonging, after which 91% of young people reported a positive change in perceptions of themselves, how they viewed others and how they responded to prejudice 6
    7. 7. What is our work?• Workshops use interactive exercises: group learning, role-play – simple models that help participants to understand their behaviour• Training is relevant to their daily experience of conflict, and is engaging and challenging• Training increases participants’ self-awareness, emotional intelligence and understanding of their range of choices• We then provide opportunities and new roles to practise and develop new behaviours 7
    8. 8. What is our work?“I know I will take what I have learnt with me through life” 8
    9. 9. Leap’s worka. Early intervention: typically in schools associated with violenceb. Tackling stubborn levels of public violence: work with gangs, weapon carriers, response to recent violencec. Support those already in criminal justice system: YOIs and through the gates workd. Progression opportunities for young people: youth engagement; workplace traininge. Coordinating; not duplicating or competing: sharing latest evidence-based best practice 9
    10. 10. Responding to the riots• Aftermath dominated by knee-jerk reactions• Our response: work with young people, our expert trainers, and like-minded organisations• Harnessing collective expertise of c.30 organisations to draw up a constructive, sustainable programme of local activity – Repair the damage done to the relationships that make up each community – Build capacity to prevent violence escalating 10
    11. 11. Find out morewww.leapcc.org.ukhttp://twitter.com/leap_ccrichard.sved@leapcc.org.uk020 7561 3700 11

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