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  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • 10/08/13 20:32 SHOW General Session Day 2 Cisco Live! 2009
  • Cisco believes that gaining the advantages of cloud computing in the enterprise begins with establishing a trusted approach to the cloud. Without trust, the economics of cloud computing make little difference. The network can uniquely address trust in private clouds Trust in the cloud centers on four core concepts: Security – Traditional issues around data and resource access control, encryption and incident detection Control – The ability of the enterprise to directly manage how and where data and software is deployed, used and destroyed Service-Level Management – The definition, contracting and enforcement of service level agreements between a variety of parties Compliance – Conformance with required regulatory, legal and general industry requirements (such as PCI, HIPAA and Sarbanes-Oxley)
  • While OGD promotes increased civil discourse, improved public welfare and a more efficient use of public resources, it raises privacy and security concerns that may legally prevent certain data sets from being shared with the public. The challenge that governments face is making government data public while at the same time protecting personally identifiable information, keeping data safe from corruption and suitably controlling access to it. Sharing digital information is, to be sure, no small matter. Legal and fiscal constraints guide the use of technology in government, and new questions arise. Does open data make government vulnerable? Is it responsible to share data without appropriate context? What data should be openly shared? All these are policy questions KM experts in governments are facing and we expect that UN PACS will provide answers and guidance for these questions.
  • While OGD promotes increased civil discourse, improved public welfare and a more efficient use of public resources, it raises privacy and security concerns that may legally prevent certain data sets from being shared with the public. The challenge that governments face is making government data public while at the same time protecting personally identifiable information, keeping data safe from corruption and suitably controlling access to it. Sharing digital information is, to be sure, no small matter. Legal and fiscal constraints guide the use of technology in government, and new questions arise. Does open data make government vulnerable? Is it responsible to share data without appropriate context? What data should be openly shared? All these are policy questions KM experts in governments are facing and we expect that UN PACS will provide answers and guidance for these questions. Data Privacy Day is an international event celebrated by the U.S., Canada, and the European Union. Data Privacy Day is designed to raise awareness and promote education about the importance of protecting the privacy of personal information, online, in mobile contexts, and otherwise. This year, January 28, 2009 was officially recognized as National Data Privacy Day by the United States House and Senate.
  • http://www.privacy.ohio.gov/resources/
  • HISP - Holistic Information Security Practitioner managed by HISPI - Holistic Information Security Practitioner Institute - www.hispi.org CISSP - Certified Information Systems Security Professional managed by (ISC)2 - International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium - www.isc2.org CISM - Certified Information Security Manager managed by ISACA - Information Systems Audit and Control Association - www.isaca.org CISA - Certified Information Systems Auditor managed by ISACA - Information Systems Audit and Control Association - www.isaca.org CCSK - Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge managed by CSA - Cloud Security Alliance - www.cloudsecurityalliance.org http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • HISP - Holistic Information Security Practitioner managed by HISPI - Holistic Information Security Practitioner Institute - www.hispi.org CISSP - Certified Information Systems Security Professional managed by (ISC)2 - International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium - www.isc2.org CISM - Certified Information Security Manager managed by ISACA - Information Systems Audit and Control Association - www.isaca.org CISA - Certified Information Systems Auditor managed by ISACA - Information Systems Audit and Control Association - www.isaca.org CCSK - Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge managed by CSA - Cloud Security Alliance - www.cloudsecurityalliance.org http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ Division for Public Administration and Development Management

Brunei e services workshop Brunei e services workshop Presentation Transcript

  • DPADM/UNDESA Presentation Government of Brunei Darussalam Richard Kerby Senior Inter-Regional Adviser E-Government and Knowledge Management kerby@un.org E-Government Services
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 2 E-Government Services 1. Overview of e-Government Services 2. Top e-government Applications  E-Government  E-Health  E-Education 3. EU Country Studies – e-signatures  Lithuania  Luxembourg  Slovak 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) 5. M-Government 6. Cloud Computing 7. Open Government Data 8. Security 9. Way Forward
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 3 1. Overview of e-Government Services E-Government primarily consists of two parts: front-office and back-office. The front office part is comprised of online service delivery to citizens and businesses, through the Internet or other digital means. The back-office part is comprised of internal government administration and information sharing in the form of services both within and between governments. In this briefing note, Government-to- Citizens (G2C) and Government-to-Business (G2B) services are categorized as front-office, and Government-to- Government (G2G) as back-office.* * ESCAP Briefing Note 3
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 4 1. Overview of e-Government Services G2C services include information dissemination and basic citizen services. Electronic G2C services are characterized by a government-wide information sharing system and new Internet based applications. These allow citizens to access information and other services using a single-window online portal. Such a portal can provide the following citizen services: • Processing and issuance of various permits/authorizations and certificates • Information on legislative/administrative notices and relevant laws • Payment services, including tax refunds and social welfare payments • Government administration participation, including requesting public hearings and casting electronic votes.* * ESCAP Briefing Note 3
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 5 1. Overview of e-Government Services Electronic G2B service delivery consists of a one-stop single-window service for businesses. The services covered include corporate civil administrative affairs, industrial information, and electronic transaction services. A few examples of these electronic transaction services are procurements, bids and awards, along with payment services for various taxes and public charges. • An integrated e-procurement system – i.e. a single-window government procurement system in which all procurements-related processes such as registration, tender, contract, and payment are done via the Internet • An e-customs system that would streamline customs administration in the import and export industry while establishing effective smuggling interdiction • e-Commerce to support the buying and selling of goods and services* * ESCAP Briefing Note 3
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 6 1. Overview of e-Government Services The ‘business case’ for Fibre-to-the-Home (FttH) networks is no longer based solely on the commercial returns from Internet access and other communication services. It also incorporates the social and economic benefits provided by such infrastructure. In Australia, for example, the government is looking at using next- generation telecoms infrastructure to promote the digital economy, including e-health, e-education, smart grids, media and other FttH applications. * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 7 2. Top e-government Applications G2C services G2B services Income tax Social contributions Job search Corporate tax Social security VAT declaration E-ID Registration of new company Car registration Open Data (Statistical data) Building permits Customs declaration Declaration to the police Environment-related permits Fines Procurement
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 8 2. E-Health  E-health is rapidly shaping up as one of the main killer apps on the truly high-speed broadband networks and millions of people around the world can potentially benefit from e-health applications.  In the western world we are facing a huge dilemma in relation to healthcare. New technologies and knowledge have resulted in increased life expectation and improved lifestyles. The cost of this, however, is enormous and we simply can no longer afford to finance these advances through the public health systems.  In countries with proper broadband infrastructure e-health is developing in a way that will enable us to enjoy these advances in medical technology and medical services, at a more affordable cost. In developing markets such as Africa, where mobile phones make up the majority of telephone subscriptions, mobile applications may also offer access to better quality healthcare. * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 9 2. E-Health * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd •US health care spending is expected to increase and reach $4.2 trillion in 2016, the equivalent of 20% of GDP (up from around $2.3 trillion in 2007); •Healthcare spending in China is forecast to grow to $323 billion by 2025; •Health care spending accounts for around 10.9% of the GDP in Switzerland, 10.7% in Germany, 9.7% in Canada and 9.5% in France; •Healthcare spending in the UAE is around 2.5% of GDP; •Health spending is rising faster than incomes in most developed countries; •According to UW’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, spending on global health aid for poor countries had quadrupled from around $5.6 billion in 1990 to $21.8 billion in 2007. Healthcare spending statistics
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 10 2. E-Health * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd Projected regional increases in total healthcare spending: 2020 - 2050 Region Increase in health care spending Europe and Central Asia 14% East Asia and Pacific 37% South Asia 45% Latin America and Caribbean 47% Sub – Saharan Africa 52% Middle East and North Africa 62%
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 11 2. E-Health Applications * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd With the current overload in most, if not all, of the world’s medical systems; waiting times are increasing and valuable time is being wasted. One very basic service is an appointment service, where you can check dates and times for appointments. More advances are being made in the private healthcare sector, such as video consultation, where patients and medical practitioners have a greater freedom to use such services. However, there is no doubt in our minds that over time these will be implemented into the public healthcare system as well. Digital healthcare appointment systems
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 12 2. E-Health Applications * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd In Estonia an e-health care initiative, the Estonian Digital Health Information System, has been implemented to increase efficiencies in the health care process. Initiated in 2008 with development scheduled to continue until 2013, the Estonian Digital Health Information System is designed to facilitate quality healthcare services, guarantee patients’ rights and protect public health. It is comprised of a patient portal, digital imaging and digital prescriptions, designed to provide benefits such as allowing patients to make and cancel appointments with a health care service provider online via one web portal; and rapid access to patient records by health care service providers. Estonia’s E-Health evolution
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 13 2. E-Health Applications * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd Twitter can be used for more than just social communication. Examples of potential medical uses for Twitter, including: • Capture and collating biomedical device data; • Assisting with management of diabetes; • Diagnostic discussions; • Tracking disease; • Communicating infant care information; • Communicating alerts such as drug safety updates; • Consulting and follow-up with patients after discharge; • Support for drug and alcohol rehabilitation; • Assist patients in clinical trials (i.e. TrialX). Using Twitter for e-health
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 14 2. E-Education E-learning, also known as online education/ training, tele- education or distance education is essentially the delivery of training or teaching, using technologies. It can include web- based seminars and classes, downloadable content, CD- ROM content, video content, live instruction in classroom settings, online forums, chats and virtual training programs. * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 15 2. E-Education Applications * © Copyright Paul Budde Communication Pty Ltd •ATutor http://atutor.ca/ •ILIAS http://www.ilias.de/docu/ •Claroline http://www.claroline.net/ •LAMS http://www.lamsinternational.com/ •Dokeos http://www.dokeos.com/ •Moodle http://moodle.org/ •eFront http://www.efrontlearning.net/ •OLAT http://www.olat.com/de/index.html •Fle3 http://fle3.uiah.fi/ •SAKAI http://sakaiproject.org/ Open source e-learning projects
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 16 2. E-Education Applications • Registration online (primary, secondary and tertiary) • Validation of certificates • Results of exams and grades • Application for scholarships • Reserve books online • Students/Parents/Teacher work spaces • Ask the professor • Email alerts when students are out or sick • GIS location of schools
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 17 3. EU Country Studies – e-signatures  Lithuania  Luxembourg  Slovak
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 18 3. EU Country Studies – e-signatures  Which Institutions should handle design, implementation and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) e-signatures  Which PKI option would be better implemented in Brunei  Identify three applications that would require PKIs
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 19 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) You cannot manage what you do not measure You cannot improve if you do not measure * ForeSee
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 20 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) * ForeSee Credible Valid Accurate PreciseReliable Sensitive
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 21 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Team Exercise Four Teams Identify three Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for one online service
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 22 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Number of Transactions Cost of Transactions Savings Overall Traffic % of New Visitors % of Repeat Visitors Return on Investment Amount of time spent on the site # of Pages Views # of users vs. actual transactions # of Clicks Average pages per visit % of responses to email sent # of users that signed up for newsletters
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 23 4. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) * ForeSee Success = Satisfaction http://kpilibrary.com/home
  • 4. USAGE  WebTrends Analytics is a Web analytics tool which collects and presents information about user behavior on web sites. It collects data from Web server log files augmented with information from client-side scripts, presents results through a graphic user interface, and can present a large variety of data and analyses on many different kinds of web sites. The report presentation interface is highly configurable, allowing the administrator to select specific information to present. It has a large number of configuration parameters, and requires the administrator to understand HTTP and other Web technologies in detail. WebTrends Analytics can require considerable resources and governance for web sites with high traffic.
  • 4. USAGE
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 26 5. M-Government Mobile Government is the next inevitable direction of evolution of eGovernment. It is about modernising the public sector organisations - hence the business processes, the work and the workers - using mobile technologies, applications and services. M- Government is not only about technology but rather how technology revolutionise the public sector activities and how the society adopts these technologies. Mobile devices provide a faster and timely way of delivering information to citizens and is considered as the most common medium or enabler of m-government. In countries with limited wireless infrastructure and m-services, short message service (SMS) can transmit simple m-services to provide services to citizens. Mobile Government Consortium
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 27 5. M-Government The main benefit of the m-government is that it truly helps to create an integrated digital nervous system for government. The advancement of ICT explains why new m-government applications emerge and why government has many opportunities through the wireless channels. Its immediacy and convenience reduces the previous barriers to public service operations, encouraging citizens or service providers to make use of the technology. Digital systems enable public service personnel to gather data more efficiently and improve its delivery, also encourage citizens to utilize public services more easily and be more cordial in the city's or government's decision process. Mobi Solutions Ltd
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 28 5. M-Government Team Exercise Four Teams Identify three Key M-Government Applications
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 29 5. M-Government applications Delivery Date Calculator Mobile Poll Weather Daily Price Index Stock Market Securities Pay Parking Spot Kiosk and CSC Locator Pay Electricity and Water Bills Check Traffic Offences Agriculture water levels Student Exam Results Hotel Directory Security Information Upload health data Driving Instructor Contact Details eGovernment Blog Customs Clearing Agencies Directory Price of Medicine Health Care Clinics Flight Information Tracking Postal Packages Register Complaints
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 30 6. Cloud Technology "The cloud will do for government what the Internet did in the '90s," he said. "We're interested in consumer technology for the enterprise," Kundra added. "It's a fundamental change to the way our government operates by moving to the cloud. Rather than owning the infrastructure, we can save millions.“ - Vivek Kundra, US Federal Government CIO http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20081126_1117.php * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 31 6. Cloud Technology “I believe it's the future," he says. "It's moving technology leaders away from just owning assets, deploying assets and maintaining assets to fundamentally changing the way services are delivered.“ - Vivek Kundra, US Federal Government CIO http://www.cio.de/news/cio_worldnews/867008 * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 32 6. Cloud Technology “Don't fight Mother Nature. It's inevitable that applications will move to the cloud, it's just a matter of which ones. Embrace the change and manage the change in a way that's effective for your business. When it comes to cloud computing, the train has left the station” - John W. Thompson, Chairman and Ex-CEO Symantec http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/news/article/0,289142,sid14_gci1523794,00.html * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 33 6. Cloud Technology This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models. * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 34 6. Cloud Technology * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 35 6. Cloud Technology  Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS) – Use provider’s applications over a network  Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS) – Deploy customer-created applications to a cloud  Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) – Rent processing, storage, network capacity, and other fundamental computing resources * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 36 6. Cloud Technology  Private cloud – enterprise owned or leased  Community cloud – shared infrastructure for specific community  Public cloud – Sold to the public, mega-scale infrastructure  Hybrid cloud – composition of two or more clouds * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 37 6. Cloud Technology CommunityCommunity CloudCloud PrivatePrivate CloudCloud Public CloudPublic Cloud Hybrid Clouds Deployment Models Service Models Essential Characteristics Common Characteristics Software as a Service (SaaS) Platform as a Service (PaaS) Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Resource Pooling Broad Network Access Rapid Elasticity Measured Service On Demand Self-Service Low Cost Software Virtualization Service Orientation Advanced Security Homogeneity Massive Scale Resilient Computing Geographic Distribution * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 38 6. Cloud Technology - Security  Shifting public data to a external cloud reduces the exposure of the internal sensitive data  Cloud homogeneity makes security auditing/testing simpler  Clouds enable automated security management  Redundancy / Disaster Recovery * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 39 6. Cloud Technology - Security  Clouds typically have a single security architecture but have many customers with different demands  Organizations have more control over the security architecture of private clouds followed by community and then public  Higher sensitivity data is likely to be processed on clouds where organizations have control over the security model * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 40 6. Cloud Technology – Security Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) Top Threats Research:  Trust: Lack of Provider transparency, impacts Governance, Risk Management, Compliance  Data: Leakage, Loss or Storage in unfriendly geography  Insecure Cloud software  Malicious use of Cloud services  Account/Service Hijacking  Malicious Insiders  Cloud-specific attacks * eFortresses
  • Where is IT’s Greatest Impact on Government? Federal CIO Survey Question: Where will investments in technology have the greatest impact on the performance of government? Source: AFFIRM, December 2008 Cross-Agency Information Sharing and Collaboration Information Security and Privacy Critical Infrastructure Sustainability and Continuity Government Management Transparent, Citizen-Centric Government
  • BENEFIT COMMENT Cost Savings Organizations can reduce or eliminate IT capital expenditures and reduce ongoing operating expenditures by paying only for the services they use and, potentially, by reducing the size of their IT staffs. Ease of Implementation Without the need to purchase hardware, software licenses, or implementation services, an organization can implement cloud computing rapidly. Flexibility Cloud computing offers more flexibility (often called “elasticity”) in matching IT resources to business functions than past computing methods. It can also increase mobility of staff by allowing them to access business information and applications from a wider range of locations and/or devices. Scalability Organizations using cloud computing need not scramble to secure additional hardware and software when user loads increase, but can instead add and subtract capacity as the network load dictates. Access to Top-End IT Capabilities Particularly for smaller organizations, cloud computing can allow access to hardware, software, and IT staff of a caliber far beyond that which they can attract and/or afford for themselves. Redeployment of IT Staff By reducing or doing away with constant server updates and other computing issues, and eliminating expenditures of time and money on application development, organizations may be able to concentrate at least some of their IT staff on higher-value tasks. Focusing on Core Competencies Arguably, the ability to run data centers and to develop and manage software applications is not necessarily a core competency of most organizations. Cloud computing may make it much easier to reduce or shed these functions, allowing organizations to concentrate their efforts on issues central to their business such as (in government) the development of policy and design and delivery of public services. Sustainability The poor energy efficiency of most existing data centers, due to substandard design or inefficient asset utilization, is now understood to be environmentally and economically unsustainable. Cloud service providers, through leveraging economies of scale and their capacity to managing computing assets more efficiently, can consume far less energy and other resources than traditional data center operators. 6. Benefits of Cloud Technology * Cisco
  • 6. Challenges of Cloud Technology * Cisco
  • Where to start: Low-Hanging Fruit for Government Cloud Projects  Collaboration & information sharing  Next phase of infrastructure virtualization  Hosting of non-critical applications & non-sensitive data  Development, QA and Test  Projects with large-scale compute and storage demands  Security services
  • Key to Agency Adoption of Cloud: Trust Before the Economics of Cloud Computing Can be Considered, Agencies Require a Trusted Service Infrastructure Security Control Service-Level Management Compliance
  • data and information produced or commissioned by government or government controlled entities 7. Open Government data
  • Examples of government data Traffic, air quality, budget spending, hospital bed utilization, students per class, crime rates, incidents, and so on Traffic lights, security cameras, electrical grid, water pipes, and so forth
  • Recent trends in Government Data? openopen government datagovernment data if the data can be freely used, reused and redistributed by anyone
  • How is it useful?
  • LEADERSHIP  Someone needs to PUSH for open data  How? Directives, acts, laws, regulations
  • An example of PUSH : USA - Open Government Initiative
  • Citizens monitor data streams
  • Risks: Privacy and SecurityPrivacy and Security  While Open Govt. Data promotes increased civil discourse, improved public welfare and a more efficient use of public resources, it raises privacy and security concerns that may legally prevent certain data sets from being shared with the public
  • Challenges Gov’t facing while opening data Protecting personally identifiable information Suitably control access to the data Keep data safe from corruption
  • How do they respond? Data Protection Act Privacy and Security Laws Advocacy  Data Privacy Day Raising Awareness  News http://www.privacy.ohio.gov/  Resources: http://www.privacy.ohio.gov/resources
  • Research & Timeline  Legal and Regulatory Framework – 2009 Q4  Legislation on Open Government Data including but not limited to Freedom of Information Acts  Legislation on Privacy and Security including but not limited to Data Protection Acts  Other resources – 2010 Q1  Government sites with Open Data  Citizen initiated sites that utilize Gov’t Data  Policy, Strategies & Technologies for Opening Gov’t Data  Policy, Strategies & Technologies for implementing Privacy and Security in Government
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 59 8. Security – Certification Programs
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 60 8. Security – Certification Matrix * eFortresses
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 61 9. Way Forward * ESCAP Briefing Note 3
  • http://www.UNPAN.org/DPADM/ 62 Thank You kerby@un.org