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GACE I -  Basic Skills Workshop
 

GACE I - Basic Skills Workshop

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Basic Skills Self-Administered Test for Reading, Writing, and Mathematics With Answers To Check Your Accuracy

Basic Skills Self-Administered Test for Reading, Writing, and Mathematics With Answers To Check Your Accuracy

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    GACE I -  Basic Skills Workshop GACE I - Basic Skills Workshop Presentation Transcript

    • GACE I Basic Skills Workshop Reading & Writing Dr. Richard Binkney, Ph.D. Revised 2010
    • GACE I -- Passing Scores “Some succeed because they are destined to – But most succeed because they are determined to.”
      • Scale 100 – 300
      • Passing Score 220
      • You must pass all 3 sections
      • No limit to re-takes
    • Paper Test Selection
      • *Morning 7:45 am – 12.30 pm 4 hrs
      • *Afternoon 1:00 pm – 5:45 pm 4 hrs
      • *…You are automatically given four hours to take one test of an assessment if you register for only one test per session or test administration….” p. 21/GACE
      • Test I – Reading (200)
      • Afternoon only
      • Test II – Math (201)
      • Test III – Writing (202)
      • * 1 or 2 content tests
      • Test Date Deadline Late $ Report
      • *March 27 Feb. 12 March 5 April 26
      • *May 8 April 30
      • *June 19 May 7 May 28 July 19
      • *July 17 July 9
      • *August 21 July 9 July 30 Sept. 20
      Paper Test Dates
    • GACE I –Computer-Based Testing
      • Registration for the new Computer-Based Testing --
      • only for the Basics Skills Tests (Reading, Writing,
      • and Mathematics) -- is available on a first come –
      • first served basis at test sites in Albany, Atlanta-
      • North, Atlanta-South, Macon, or Savannah, GA.
      • See the Internet at: www.GACE.nesinc.com
      • Computer-Based Test Dates –
      • February 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24
      • April 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28
      • Atlanta—Metro area (104)
        • Parkview High – Lilburn & Pebblebook High – Mableton
      • Atlanta—North area (106)
        • Forsyth Central – Cumming & Centennial High – Roswell
      • Atlanta—South area (108)
        • Sandy Creek – Tyrone
      • Atlanta—West area (110)
        • Pope High – Marietta
      • Macon area (116)
        • Rutland High – Macon
      Paper Test Sites                                                               
    • Atlanta Test Areas Atlanta Paper Test Areas
      • Nonrefundable administration fee $45
      • Nonrefundable registration processing fee (per test date) $20
      • Basic Skills (per test) $25
      • Late fee $30
      • Emergency fee $50
      Test Fees
      • Internet (24/7) www.gace.nesinc.com
      • Visa or MasterCard only
      • US Mail
        • Visa or MasterCard
        • Check/Money Order
      • Telephone only for Emergency
      • registration 800/523-7064 (9 to 5)
        • Visa or MasterCard only
      Registration Options
    • What to Bring to the Test Site
      • Admission ticket
      • Several No. 2 pencils
      • Proper Identification
        • One piece of current
        • government-issued ID
        • in the name in which you
        • registered bearing your photo
        • and signature
      • One other piece of ID
      • Thumb print with be taken
      • Enhanced security measures expected
    • Test Site Prohibitions
      • No Smoking
      • No Visitors
      • No Weapons
      • No Cell phones
      • No Electronic devices
      • No Calculators
      • No Handwritten or printed
      • materials
      • No Packages
      • No Food or Drink
      • No Unauthorized aids
    • Personal Information To Register
      • Name
      • Address
      • Daytime telephone number
      • (Internet)
      • Social security number
      • Date of birth
      • Ethnicity (optional)
      • Gender (optional)
      • E-mail address (Internet)
    • Test Taking Strategies
      • Schedule study time & break time – Practice test skills
      • Surround yourself with positive supporters
      • Be rested & comfortable
      • Eat a good meal & exercise
      • Know what to expect
      • Arrive on time & take snacks
      • Expect some anxiety
      • Avoid worried testers
      • Keep a positive attitude
      • Concentrate on the test
      • Take one question at a time
      • Relax – Breathe – Start to work
    • Time Management
      • Plan ahead * Be prepared * Be confident
      • Look ahead
      • Pacing is critical
      • Do not skim—read carefully
      • Think – then write
      • Bring a watch (no alarms)
      • Write down time left
      • Keep your eye on the goal
    • When You Get Your Test
      • Check to see the test is complete
      • Read the instructions carefully
      • Follow the directions & rules
      • Read each question carefully
      • Answer easy questions first
      • Circle key words in hard questions
      • Read all possible answers –
      • the best one could be the last choice
      • Answer all questions. You are NOT penalized for
      • wrong answers. Guess wisely.
    • Test Taking Tips
      • Find a study partner and/or study group/study plan
      • Don’t believe the rumors you hear
      • Don’t expect to find a pattern in the positions of the answers or try any “beat the test” strategies
      • Don’t make uneducated guesses. Try to get the correct answer by reasoning and eliminating the wrong answers.
      • Usually first choice is right
      • ONE response is the best
      • Skip difficult questions
      • Pencil mark test questions
    • Test Taking Tips
      • Prepare * Organize * Practice
      • Follow directions exactly
      • Reword difficult questions in your own words
              • * Record the answer correctly
              • * Manage your time wisely
              • * Pace yourself
              • * Tune out distractions
              • * Stay focused
              • * Keep a good attitude
              • * Think positively
    • Before Your Turn In Your Test
      • Use every minute of the time wisely
      • Review and proof your answers
      • Check for an answer in each box
      • Respond fully & clearly
      • Remember the test is only
      • one way of measuring your
      • academic performance.
    • Do You Have Test Anxiety?
      • Negative thoughts:
        • Past performance
        • Consequences of failure
        • How everyone else is doing
        • Knowing the answers after the test, but not while taking it
      • Mental blank-out
      • Racing thoughts
      • Difficulty concentrating
    • Signs of Test Anxiety
      • Test Anxiety can manifest itself physically, just like other forms of stress and anxiety. Some of the symptoms you may experience are:
      • * Nausea
      • * Cramps
      • * Faintness
        • * Sweating
      • * Headache
      • * Butterflies
      • * Dry mouth
      • * Tense muscles
      • * Fast heartbeat
              • * Increased breathing rate
    • Counter Negative Thoughts With Positive Thoughts & Actions
      • Negative
      • I always do poorly on tests.
      • If I don’t pass this test, I’m a failure.
      • The test is going to have trick questions.
      • It’s impossible to learn all these things.
      • My knowledge of 1 area is shaky.
      • Positive
      • I’ve got a better study plan for this
      • test than I ever had before.
      • I’m going to pass, but if I don’t
      • I can bounce back.
      • The test is designed to let me
      • show what I know, and I know all
      • the format of the questions.
      • I don’t need to know the answer
      • to every question; I just need to
      • pass.
      • I don’t need to know everything.
      • Also, if I start studying now and join
      • a study group, I can learn more.
    • Learn the Truth About Tests
      • MYTH REALITY
      • *The first question is always a “trick.” *No question is intentionally “tricky.”
      • *The same answer choice never appears *There are no set rules about answer
      • more than 3 times in a row. choice or placement.
      • *Questions are written to test how well you *Every question is written to test a
      • take standardized test, not what you specific skill or piece of knowledge.
      • actually know.
      • *Test are designed so you have to answer *Tests are designed so that most test
      • each question really quick or run takers will have enough time to
      • out of time. answer every question.
      • *Hard questions are worth more *All questions count equally. If you find
      • points than any others. a hard one, move on, & save it for later
      • *Tests are full of biased *Test makers do everything possible to
      • questions. ensure no bias occurs in questions.
    • Overcoming Test Anxiety
      • Put the test in perspective
      • Prepare * Prepare * Prepare
      • Locate test site early
      • Avoid test cramming
      • Think of good things
      • Take a short walk or exercise
      • Visualize your success
      • Take deep breaths – exhale slowly
      • Imagine a peaceful setting
      • Concentrate on muscles – contract & relax
      • Keep away from negative influences
    • Test Design
      • Test I – Test Code 200 – Reading
        • Objectives 1-6 42 Questions
      • Test II – Test Code 201 – Math
      • Objectives 7-10 48 Questions
      • Test III – Test Code 202 - Writing
        • Objectives 11-15 42 Questions 1 Essay (4 pt. scale / 1 = F)
    • Reading Pattern Plan of Attack
      • SKIM the “questions” first
        • Mark important words
      • READ the passage actively
        • Mark main points
      • ANSWER the question/s
        • Without spending a lot of time on any one question
    • The “Plus – Minus” System
      • Answer easy questions immediately
      • When you reach a problem question,
        • place a minus sign (-) beside it
      • Mark a “guess” answer (?)
        • and move on
      • Place a plus sign (+) beside
        • any time consuming problem
        • and move on
      • Eliminate (mark out) wrong answers
      • Narrow down your possible choices
    •                                                G E R A D I N E T S T
    • Reading – Objective 1
      • Understand the
      • main idea and
      • supporting details
      • in written material
      • * *explicit main idea
      • *implicit main idea
      • *expression of main idea
      • *support the main idea
      • When you want to hang the American flag over the middle of a street, suspend it vertically with the blue field, called the union, to the north and east-west street. When the flag is displayed with another banner from crossed staffs, the American flag is on the right. Place the staff of the American flag in front of the other staff. Raise the flag quickly and lower it slowly and respectfully. When flying the flag at half-mast, hoist it to the top of the pole for a moment before lowering it to mid-pole.
      • When flying the American flag with
      • banners from states or cities, raise the
      • nation’s banner first and lower it last.
      • Never allow the flag to touch the ground.
      Reading-- 1
    • Q-1 What is the main idea of this passage?
      • A. The American flag is the symbol of American freedom.
      • B. The American flag has fifty stars.
      • C. Placing the American flag inappropriately will draw government intervention.
      • D. American flag should be flown differently in certain situations.
      • E. The flag should be lowered quickly and respectfully.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    • Reading – Objective 2
      • Identify a writer’s
      • purpose and
      • point of view.
      • *audience
      • **purpose
      • *appropriateness
      • *effect on an audience
      • *word choice and phrasing
      • *style & content
    • Reading – 2-i
      • The North American black bear (Ursus Americanus) hibernates for more than a third of the year—sometimes for as long as five months. During this period of relative dormancy, the bear is self-sufficient, requiring nothing from the outside. It does not eat or drink, nor does it eliminate body wastes. Waste products that in other animals (including humans) would rapidly elevate to lethal levels in the blood are broken down into basic chemicals and then recycled as new proteins. And by burning its fat stores (accumulated during a late-summer feeding frenzy), the bear produces—internally—all the water it needs.
      • Scientists do not know what causes a bear to start the late-summer eating binge that allows it to hibernate all winter. During the later summer, bears may spend up to 20 hours a day eating almost anything that is readily available, including garbage. The normal caloric intake of an adult bear is about 4,000 calories a day. During the late-summer feeding frenzy, however, this figure climbs to 20,000 calories a day—five times the normal intake. By the time the bear has finished feasting, it will have added five inches of fat to its body—a layer thick enough to sustain it during hibernation.
      • Exactly what initiates the release of the “hibernation induction trigger” is still a mystery. Current studies suggest that it may be the shortage of food that does it, rather than the coming of cooler weather or the shortened day. At some point in the fall the amount of easily obtainable food drops drastically. When this happens, the energy the bear would have to expend looking for food is greater than the food energy it is likely to find.
      Reading – 2-ii
      • Their feasting finally ended, black bears start out for their wintering areas. Once there, some go to sleep in hollow logs, others curl up in abandoned tunnels, and still others build a kind of bird’s nest and bed down right out in the open. In Minnesota, bears bedding down in the open often experience temperatures as low as 40 degrees below zero. Eventually they become covered with layers of snow.
      • Female black bears usually give birth to cubs in January, midway through hibernation. During the delivery, the female only briefly rouses from sleep. The cubs, born blind, find their way to the mother’s nipples by sensing heat. Sometimes, female black bears with cubs are even discovered hibernating in open nests, their offspring snuggled in the warm curl of the mother’s body.
      Reading – 2-iii
      • Reading – 2-iv
      • While other hibernating animals (ground squirrels, various bats, and woodchucks, for example) show an enormous drop in heart rate and body temperature, the physiological changes exhibited by hibernating bears are far less dramatic. A ground squirrel’s heart rate falls from 350 beats per minute to as low as 2. Its core body temperature drops 64 degrees, from 98 to 34.
      • A black bear’s normal sleeping heart rate of 40 beats per minute might drop to 8, and its normal body temperature of about 100 degrees does not fall below 91 degrees. Also, the small hibernators are slow to wake up, while a hibernating black bear can awake to full alertness in seconds and become extremely dangerous.
    • Reading – 2 - v
      • Currently, the black bear’s hibernation process is being studied by a number of researchers, including wildlife biologists, physiologists, and biochemists. By understanding the bear’s amazingly efficient metabolism, scientists hope one day to find new treatments for human ailments such as kidney failure and bone disease.
    • Q 2 - Which of the following best describes the author’s point for writing this selection?
      • To review the current state of knowledge regarding black bears’ hibernation
      • To compare the physiological changes experienced by smaller and larger hibernating animals
      • To explain important causes and effects of hibernation among black bears
      • To demonstrate how humans may benefit from a fuller understanding of the bear’s hibernation process
    • Reading – Objective 3
      • Analyze the
      • relationship
      • among ideas in
      • written material.
      • *sequence of events
      • *identification of relationships
      • *analyzing relationships
      • *predicting outcomes
      • **drawing conclusions
    • Reading – 3-i
      • The North American black bear (Ursus americanus) hibernates for more than a third of the year—sometimes for as long as five months. During this period of relative dormancy, the bear is self-sufficient, requiring nothing from the outside. It does not eat or drink, nor does it eliminate body wastes. Waste products that in other animals (including humans) would rapidly elevate to lethal levels in the blood are broken down into basic chemicals and then recycled as new proteins. And by burning its fat stores (accumulated during a late-summer feeding frenzy), the bear produces—internally—all the water it needs.
    • Reading – 3 - ii Scientists do not know what causes a bear to start the late-summer eating binge that allows it to hibernate all winter. During the later summer, bears may spend up to 20 hours a day eating almost anything that is readily available, including garbage. The normal caloric intake of an adult bear is about 4,000 calories a day. During the late-summer feeding frenzy, however, this figure climbs to 20,000 calories a day—five times the normal intake. By the time the bear has finished feasting, it will have added five inches of fat to its body—a layer thick enough to sustain it during hibernation. Exactly what initiates the release of the “hibernation induction trigger” is still a mystery. Current studies suggest that it may be the shortage of food that does it, rather than the coming of cooler weather or the shortened day. At some point in the fall the amount of easily obtainable food drops drastically. When this happens, the energy the bear would have to expend looking for food is greater than the food energy it is likely to find.
    • Reading – 3 - iii Their feasting finally ended, black bears start out for their wintering areas. Once there, some go to sleep in hollow logs, others curl up in abandoned tunnels, and still others build a kind of bird’s nest and bed down right out in the open. In Minnesota, bears bedding down in the open often experience temperatures as low as 40 degrees below zero. Eventually they become covered with layers of snow. Female black bears usually give birth to cubs in January, midway through hibernation. During the delivery, the female only briefly rouses from sleep. The cubs, born blind, find their way to the mother’s nipples by sensing heat. Sometimes, female black bears with cubs are even discovered hibernating in open nests, their offspring snuggled in the warm curl of the mother’s body.
    • Reading – 3 - iv While other hibernating animals (ground squirrels, various bats, and woodchucks, for example) show an enormous drop in heart rate and body temperature, the physiological changes exhibited by hibernating bears are far less dramatic. A ground squirrel’s heart rate falls from 350 beats per minute to as low as 2. Its core body temperature drops 64 degrees, from 98 to 34. A black bear’s normal sleeping heart rate of 40 beats per minute might drop to 8, and its normal body temperature of about 100 degrees does not fall below 91 degrees. Also, the small hibernators are slow to wake up, while a hibernating black bear can awake to full alertness in seconds and become extremely dangerous.
    • Reading – 3 - v
      • Currently, the black bear’s hibernation process is being studied by a number of researchers, including wildlife biologists, physiologists, and biochemists. By understanding the bear’s amazingly efficient metabolism, scientists hope one day to find new treatments for human ailments such as kidney failure and bone disease.
    • Q – 3 - Based on the information included in the selection above, the author most likely would agree with which of the following statements?
      • Humans are less self-sufficient than most other forms of animal life.
      • By learning more about the world around them, humans will come to know more about themselves.
      • The causes of some natural phenomena will always remain beyond human understanding.
      • The amount of rest required by an organism is determined primarily by the amount of food it consumes.
    • Reading – Objective 4
      • Use critical reasoning
      • skills to evaluate
      • written material.
      • * *evaluating assumptions
      • *judging facts
      • *evaluating the argument
      • *fact vs. opinion
      • *objectivity of a writer
      • While other hibernating animals (ground squirrels, various bats, and woodchucks, for example) show an enormous drop in heart rate and body temperature, the physiological changes exhibited by hibernating bears are far less dramatic. A ground squirrel’s heart rate falls from 350 beats per minute to as low as 2. Its core body temperature drops 64 degrees, from 98 to 34. On the other hand, a black bear’s normal sleeping heart rate of 40 beats per minute might drop to 8, and its normal body temperature of about 100 degrees does not fall below 91 degrees. Also, the small hibernators are slow to wake up, while a hibernating black bear can awake to full alertness in seconds and become extremely dangerous.
      Reading – 4
    • Q – 4 - In the previous paragraph, the author compares the hibernation processes of bears and squirrels. The author uses this comparison to:
      • A. Explain why researchers are interested in the hibernation process of bears.
      • B. Demonstrate the physiological deficiencies of small animals.
      • C. Illustrate unique features of the hibernation process of bears.
      • D. Suggest physiological similarities between bears and other types of animals.
    • Reading – Objective 5
      • Use reading strategies
      • to comprehend
      • written materials.
      • * * organize & summarize
      • * follow directions
      • * interpret information
      • - charts
      • - graphs
      • - tables
    • Q – 5 - Which of the following best organizes the major topics addressed in the previous reading selection?
      • I. The self-sufficiency of hibernating bears.
      • II. Processes involved in giving birth during hibernation
      • III. Physiological changes in hibernating animals
      • I. Waste elimination and caloric intake in hibernating bears
      • II. Operation of the “hibernation induction trigger”
      • III. The hibernation process in small versus large animals
      • I. The late-summer feeding frenzy of bears
      • II. The bedding down process of hibernating bears
      • III.The metabolic efficiency of hibernating bears
      • I. Hibernation and how bears prepare for it
      • II. Noteworthy characteristics of bears’ hibernation
      • III.Physiological changes in bears versus other hibernating animals
    • Reading – Objective 6
      • Determine the
      • meaning of words
      • and phrases.
      • * *determine meaning of words
      • & phrases in context
      • *determine meaning of figurative
      • expressions in context
      • The North American black bear (Ursus americanus) hibernates for more than a third of the year—sometimes for as long as five months. During this period of relative dormancy, the bear is self-sufficient, requiring nothing from the outside. It does not eat or drink, nor does it eliminate body wastes. Waste products that in other animals (including humans) would rapidly elevate to lethal levels in the blood are broken down into basic chemicals and then recycled as new proteins. And by burning its fat stores (accumulated during a late-summer feeding frenzy), the bear produces—internally—all the water it needs.
      Reading – 6
    • Q – 6 - Which of the following is the best meaning of the word elevate as it is used in the previous paragraph?
              • A. Advance
              • B. Increase
              • C. Become prominent
              • D. Lift
    • THE WRITING TEST
    • Writing – Objective 11
      • Recognize unity,
      • focus, and
      • development
      • in writing.
      • * *shifts in point of view
      • *revisions to improve unity/focus
      • *recognize thesis statement
      • *topic sentence
      • *supporting elements
    • Read the following passage, written in the style of a college history textbook. Then answer the question/s. The numbers in the passage indicate the parts of the passage referred to in the question/s that follow. (1) It is widely believed that the stock market crash of 1929 caused the Great Depression, but this is inaccurate. (2) Although the crash may have been the first sign of the crisis, the Depression had been building for years. Writing – 11 - i
      • (3) In the 1920s, the U. S. economy depended on too few industries, mainly construction and automobiles. (4) When these industries began to decline, there was too little strength in other industries to support the economy. (5) Another problem was that purchasing power was not widely distributed among the population . (6) Manufacturers were left with large inventories of unsold goods in their warehouses. (7) Banks also contributed to the economic crisis. (8) Many of them lent out a lot of money to farmers and other business people whose ability to repay depended on a healthy economy. (9) In addition, many banks had invested recklessly in the stock market during the boom years that preceded the crash. (10) Consequently, when the stock market crashed and, at the same time, their debtors defaulted on their loans, many banks failed.
      Writing – 11 - ii
      • (11) Thus, serious economic problems were growing beneath the surface of the prosperous 1920s. (12) Problems were building in Europe as well as in America, underlining the interdependence of nations in a world economy. (13) One product of these problems may have been the stock market crash. (14) The major effect was the Great Depression itself.
      Writing – 11 - iii
    • Q – 11 - Which of the following numbered sentences draws attention away from the main idea of the last (fourth) paragraph? ( previous page – Writing - 11 – iii )
      • Sentence 14
      • Sentence 13
      • Sentence 12
      • Sentence 11
    • Writing – Objective 12
        • * Recognize
      • effective
      • organization
      • in writing.
        • paragraph organization*
        • transitional words/phrases
        • reorganizing sentences for improvement
    • 12 –a - Read the following paragraph giving consideration to effective organization of the sentences.
      • (1) At the age of eighteen he married Ann Hathaway. (2) Other than these facts, little is known of Shakespeare's early life. (3) On April 23, 1564, William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-on-Avon in England. (4) He attended a local grammar school in the town. (5) By the time he was twenty-eight, he had established his reputation by acting and writing plays. (6) Several years later he traveled to London.
                                           
    • Q – 12 - a - Select the best organizational pattern of sentences listed below which rearrange the previous paragraph into the sequence of events in which they happened.
      • 5, 2, 1, 4, 3, 6
      • 4, 6, 2, 1, 5, 3
      • 6, 3, 1, 3, 2, 5
      • 3, 4, 1, 6, 5, 2
    • 12 – b - Read the next paragraph written in the style of a college fine arts article.
      • (1) Martha Graham was born in 1893. (2) Her professional dancing career began when, as a teenager, she trained and performed with the Denishawn dance company, where she remained for seven years. (3) Her use of violent movement and discordant music in those original works was disturbing to many people, and her creations were not well received at first. (4) The company’s traditional emphasis on grace and lyricism, however, was ultimately too confining for her, and in the mid-1920s she began to choreograph, or design, her own dances. (5) She pursued her own course, however, and during the 1940s created some of her most acclaimed works, including, Letter
      • to theWorld , based on the life of poet Emily
      • Dickinson, and the joyous Appalachian
      • Spring , for which Aaron Copland
      • composed the score.
    • Q – 12 – b - Which of the following changes would make the sequence of ideas in the previous paragraph clearer?
      • A. Reverse the order of Sentences 3 & 4.
      • B. Place Sentence 5 before Sentence 1.
      • C. Reverse the order of Sentences 3 & 2.
      • D. Delete Sentence 5.
    • Writing – Objective 13
      • Recognize
      • effective
      • sentences.
      • *recognize redundancy
      • *identification—
      • sentences
      • fragments*
      • run-ons*
      • *subject-verb agreement
      • *identification—
      • double negative
      • parallel structure
      • modifiers
    • Q – 13 – a - Identify which of the following sentences is a “fragment.”
      • When the parole officer heard the report, he scratched his head because Kim needed psychiatric help.
      • Should this latest arrest be seen as a violation of her parole?
      • If one of her seven personalities
      • committed the crime.
      • Should all of her be punished?
    • Q – 13 – b - Which of the following 4 sentences is a “run-on” sentence ?
      • Travel to Canada was
      • an exciting proposition
      • for my family.
      • B. Although the trip to
        • Montreal was not well
        • planned, we had a great time.
      • The time change affected
      • both my energy level
      • and sleeping ability.
      • We followed the map
      • we ended up in Alaska.
    • Writing – Objective 14
      • Recognize Standard American English
      • verb form
      • verb cases
      • pronouns
      • antecedents
      • plural nouns
      • possessive nouns
      • adverbs
      • adjectives
      • punctuation
      • capitalization
      • (1) It is widely believed that the stock market crash of 1929 caused the Great Depression, but this is inaccurate. (2) Although the crash may have been the first sign of the crisis, the Depression had been building for years.
      • (3) In the 1920s, the U. S. economy depended on too few industries, mainly construction and automobiles. (4) When these industries began to decline, there was too little strength in other industries to support the economy. (5) Another problem was that purchasing power was not widely distributed among the population.
      Writing – 14 - i
      • (6) Manufacturers were left with large inventories of unsold goods in they’re warehouses. (7) Banks also contributed to the economic crisis. (8) Many of them lent out a lot of money to farmers and other business people whose ability to repay depended on a healthy economy. (9) In addition, many banks had invested recklessly in the stock market during the boom years that preceded the crash. (10) Consequently, when the stock market crashed and, at the same time, their debtors defaulted on their loans, many banks failed.
      Writing – 14 - ii
      • (11) Thus, serious economic problems were growing beneath the surface of the prosperous 1920s. (12) Problems were building in Europe as well as in America, underlining the interdependence of nations in a world economy. (13) One product of these problems may have been the stock market crash. (14) The major effect was the Great Depression itself.
      Writing – 14 - iii                                           
    • Q – 14 a - Which of the following changes is needed in the previous reading passage?
      • A. Sentence 2: Change
      • “ had been building” to
      • “ has been building”
      • B. Sentence 6: Change
      • “ they’re” to “their”
      • C. Sentence 8: Insert
      • comma after “farmers”
      • D. Sentence 14: Change
      • “ effect” to “affect”
      • Q – 14 –b - Read the following sentence and determine if any error occurs in written mechanics:
      • Located near Salisbury, England; and dating to between 3000 and 1000 BCE, Stonehenge is perhaps the single most famous prehistoric monument in Europe.
        • Spelling error
        • Punctuation error
        • Capitalization error
        • Sentence correct
      • Q – 14 – c - Read the following sentence and determine if any error occurs in written mechanics:
      • While the original purpose of Stonehenge is unknown, there is little doubt that it had significanse as a ritual site; in the 1960s, an astronomer suggested that the monument’s arrangement was intended to serve as a means of predicting seasonal changes and lunar and solar positions.
      • A. Spelling error
      • B. Punctuation error
      • C. Capitalization error
      • D. Sentence correct
      • The
      • Written
      • Essay
                                        
    • The 5 Paragraph Thesis
      • Title   
      • Introduction
      • A. Premise/Thesis/Topic
      • B. Statement of points
      • Body
        • Point 1
        • Point 2
        • Point 3
      • III. Conclusion
        • Summarize support
        • B. Conclusion reached
        •                                                                 
    • Criteria of a Good Thesis
      • Focus – for reader & writer
      • Easily identifiable –
      • what to look for
      • Narrow – focuses on central point
      • Takes a stand – strong argument
      • Justifies discussion
      • Works as an outline for writer
        • Asks a question
        • Gives the answer
        • Introduces evidence
      • Specific – reaches a conclusion supported by evidence in body
                                                                                        
    • Thesis : “Who Done It?”
      • Think of a Thesis Statement as the opening statement in a trial. The question is “who done it?” As the prosecuting attorney, your Thesis lays out your case. The defendant had motive, opportunity, and a weapon to commit the crime. Your opening statement or Thesis introduces the evidence to the reader. The trial (body of your essay) supports your evidence and proves the validity of your argument.
    • Thesis Characteristics
      • A thesis is a debatable point,
      • one about which reasonable
      • persons can disagree.
      • Your thesis statement serves as
      • the crux of the argument that is
      • your paper; it is your informed
      • opinion about your paper's
      • subject. 
    • Essay Writing Tips
      • Read directions carefully
      • Look for key words
      • Do what you are asked to do
      • Give facts/details/examples
      • Budget your time
      • Strong thesis statement
      • Every sentence contributes
      • Personalize
      • Be as neat as possible
      • Brainstorm – then, outline/draft
    • The 3 “Tells”
      • Tell them what you are
      • Going to tell them/Introduction
      • Tell them the Body
      • Provide main points/details
      • Tell them “I told you so”
      • Conclusion/summarize points
      • Spend time on evidence
      • Keep on topic
      • Defend your argument
      • Less is more
      • Budget your time
      • Proofread & correct errors
    • THE ESSAY TEST                                           
    • Writing – Objective 15
      • Demonstrate the ability to prepare a developed composition on a given topic using language and style appropriate to a given audience, purpose, and occasion.
      • *coherent composition
      • *clear thesis statement
      • *provide support/examples
      • *good mechanics
      • *Standard American English
    • Writing - 15 – a - Read the passage below about raising the federal tax on gasoline:
      • Should the federal tax on gasoline be raised significantly to help pay for public transportation and road improvements? Opponents argue that significantly higher gas taxes will hurt business by raising costs and will decrease the freedom of mobility of the general public. Proponents say that we need the additional revenues to finance public
      • works projects and that
      • US citizens pay less for
      • gasoline than do citizens
      • in other industrial
      • nations.
    • Q – 15 – a - Write your first practice essay/composition following these instructions.
      • Your purpose is to write a composition, to be read by a classroom instructor, in which you indicate whether you agree or disagree that the federal tax on gasoline should be raised significantly to help pay for public transportation and road improvements. Be sure to defend your position with logical arguments and appropriate examples.
    • Q – 15 – b – Written composition. Discuss in your second practice essay the extent to which you agree or disagree with the opinion stated below. Support your position with specific reasons and examples from your own experiences, observations, and/or life.
      • Film and television studios in the United States nearly always want to dish up a sunny view of life because American audiences would rather not be reminded of problems in society.
    • Other Potential Essay Topics
      • Reading opens student’s
      • ideas and sets new
      • boundaries for learning.
      • E-coli contamination
      • should not happen in
      • any public restaurant in the
      • United States today.
      • High school graduates
      • should be required to
      • take a year off to pursue
      • community service projects before entering college in order to increase their maturity and global awareness.
    • Reading Answer Key
      • 1 D Main Idea
      • 2 A Writer’s purpose
      • 3 B Relationship among ideas
      • 4 C Reasoning skills
      • D Reading strategies
      • B Meaning of words
      • and phrases
    • Writing Answer Key
      • 11 C Unity, focus development
      • 12-a D Effective organization
      • 12-b A Effective organization
      • 13-a C Effective sentences
      • 13-b D Effective sentences
      • 14a B Standard American English
      • 14b B Mechanics
      • 14c A Mechanics
      • 15 -- Develop a composition
    • With Appreciation To: Ms. Sheila Newman Technical Specialist –Henry RAC Dr. Sheila Binkney Retired Principal                                 
    • References & Helpful Information
              • www.gapsc.com
              • Georgia Professional
              • Standards Commission
              • www.gace.nesinc.com
              • GACE Exams
              • Texas Higher Education Assessment
              • www.testprepreview.com
              • www.informit.com
              • www.praxisprepinfo.com
              • www.wc.iup.edu/praxis/
              • The Writing Center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania
    • Resources
      • Dates, fees, test sites, and testing information
      • is subject to change without notice. For most
      • recent testing information, please consult:
      • WWW.GACE.NESINC.COM
      • Copyrighted © 2010–
      • Dr. Richard Binkney, Ph.D.
      • All rights reserved.
      • Materials may not be copied or used in any form without the written permission of the author.
    • THE END