SSA Farming Systems Framework: Potential input to the Dublin Process / Technology Platform

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Information sharing on the development of a Science Agenda for Agriculture in Africa With inputs for CAADP-CGIAR alignment
April 13, 2013
Dublin, Ireland

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SSA Farming Systems Framework: Potential input to the Dublin Process / Technology Platform

  1. 1. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicySSA Farming Systems Framework: Potential input to theDublin Process / Technology PlatformAgriculture Science Agenda for AfricaDiscussions on Programmatic Alignment CAADP and CGIAR13 April, DublinJean-Marc Boffa, John Dixon, Dennis Garrity, Stan Wood, and many others
  2. 2. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicyBackground on approach• FS: Large populations of farm systemsclassified on broadly similar patterns oflivelihood and consumption patterns, aswell as constraints and opportunities• Policy-making relevance: Similardevelopment strategies and interventionsapply.• Classification based on:– Agroecology (LGP), production constraints– Key commodities– Socio-economic parameters (demographic,market access, historical devt, etc)
  3. 3. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and Policy• Temporal analysis for trends• Dynamic system understandingwith analysis of drivers playing inunique ways at FS level, andspecific priorities for policy andscience• A first step– Need for regular updating– Large scale of analysis, need forlower system resolutionCategories of drivers analyzed• Population, hunger andpoverty• Natural resources andclimate• Energy• Human capital andinformation• Technology and science• Markets and trade• Institutions and policies
  4. 4. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicyMap of Sub-Saharan farming systems
  5. 5. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicyHighland Perennial FS and subsystemsCentral Highlands Western HighlandsPopulation density +++ ++++Farm size +++ ++Market infrastructure ++ +Poverty 30% poor >60% poorFarm area 35% maize17% tea17% coffeeMore high value crops42% maize8% tea10% coffee% of improved cattle 95%22% of crop area infodderZero-grazing increasing67%11% in fodderValue of production 102K KSh/household 44K KSh/householdUse of fertilizers 122 kg/ha74 manure bags51 kg/ha26 manure bagsHigh population densityHigh agricultural potentialPermanently cultivated systemsMarket-orientation as a way to intensify systems
  6. 6. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicyStrategic prioritiesAlbertine Rift systems (Diversifying)• Small market size, very high transportcosts and fertilizer prices• Shift to higher value crops moredifficult because of small farm size• Soil fertility management as pre-condition for improved productivity• Deepen market-driven intensificationthrough further diversification in cashcrops while improving productivity ofstaple food crops• Improve fertilizer markets for cashcrops• Nutrient use efficiencyCentral Kenyan Highlands (Commercializing)• Balance rural poverty objectives withincreasing marketable surpluses• Reduce transaction costs in land markets• Diversify (dairy,) soil fertility, cash reservesfor reinvestment. Continue to intensify(smallholder irrigation, timing of marketing• On-farm and off-farm employment,education, credit• Efficient staple food markets, maintenanceof home gardens (family nutrition,production of secondary staples) reduceseasonal price volatility through improvedgrain milling and storage
  7. 7. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicyAspects of potential value addition to technologyplatform• Effectiveness of innovations is conditioned by agro-ecologicalcontext. AEZ is natural target for improved research and investment• Productivity impacts of interventions more uniform within specificFS than across FS, leading to more accurate assessments• Level of higher granularity needed for effective analysis, andplanning for impact– Sustainability concern: Need for refined understanding of naturalresource and production interactions• User-defined contextualization needed for identifying relevanttechnology/innovation opportunities
  8. 8. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and Policy• Anchor some degree of complexity and integration:– Diversity of crops, technologies and practices in each FS– Focus on farm household, where production decisions, gender andnutrition issues, household welfare and resource managementoperate– Interactions between farm and natural, social and economic envt• Identify and exploit knowledge and technology transfer /spillover potential• Can it serve as one of the frameworks to express plannedand on-going investments and R&D results organized bycountries at a meaningful aggregate level?Aspects of potential value addition to technologyplatform -2
  9. 9. Farming Systems and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities for Science and PolicySample of data layers on resources, drivers and trendsin African agriculture (by FS or regional level)Agro-ecological datasets• Agro-ecological Zones Data andFarming Systems• Land Resources– Agro-ecological zonation– Length of growing period– Land use/land cover– Protected areas• Land Quality• Crop Suitability• Crop Summary Tables• Yield and Production Gaps• Biomass productivitySocio-economic datasets• Poverty• Population density (human, livestock)• Malnutrition• Distance to Market• Vulnerability to climate change

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