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Measuring policy impacts in Africa: Lessons from MAFAP
 

Measuring policy impacts in Africa: Lessons from MAFAP

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Metrics for Agricultural Transformation: Update on Recent and Ongoing Developments

Metrics for Agricultural Transformation: Update on Recent and Ongoing Developments
April 19, 2013
Washington, DC

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    Measuring policy impacts in Africa: Lessons from MAFAP Measuring policy impacts in Africa: Lessons from MAFAP Presentation Transcript

    • Measuring policy impacts in Africa:Lessons from MAFAPJean Balié and Mulat DemekeAgricultural Development Economics DivisionFAO, RomeWashington DC , 19 April 2013
    • 1. The importance of policy2. What we have learned withMAFAP3. Key conclusions
    • 1. The importance of policyHarvesting teff in Ethiopia (photo © FAO/Giulio Napolitano)
    • Source: FAO (State of Food and Agriculture 2012)• Importance of private decisions• Importance of enabling environment• Need for information and analysis tosupport policy dialogue and decisionmaking
    •  A very active field, but with a gap in terms of a system ofquantitative indicators of policy impacts in developing countries Motivation for MAFAPMany related initiatives…
    • 2. What we have learned with MAFAPCarrying maize in Mozambique (photo © FAO)
    • Key contributions• System of indicators to inform analysis, dialog, policy,resource allocation• A new market development gap indicator• Systematic and comparable across commodities, countriesand over time• Presence in 10 + countries in SSA• Partnerships to build capacity, ownership and sustained use• Evidence-based policy dialogue in on-going policy processesand primarily CAADP
    • Key findings• Policies and market development gaps reduce pricesreceived by farmers for most commodities• Market access is a significant constraint• Agri-business and value chains are underdevelopedIndicates opportunities for improved policies andexpendituresRequires improved data, analysis, capacity andbuy-in
    • PartnershipsProjectteamat FAOBMGFFAOUSAIDInstitutionalpartners(typically in theMinistry ofAgriculture)Technicalpartners(typicallyresearchinstitutions)At country levelNEPAD/CAADP, OECD, ReSAKSS and others
    • 3. ConclusionsTraining course in Burkina Faso, photo © FAO/Giulio Napolitano
    • What we have learnedAscertain country buy-in and commitment1. Seek country ownership2. Embed in existing policy process  CAADP3. Build capacities4. Support institutionalizationWork in partnerships5. Build on others strengths Ex. OECD todevelop methodology6. Add something to what exists7. Build and use a coalition to have impact
    • For more information: www.fao.org/mafap
    • More on what MAFAP contributes?Livestock production in Burkina Faso (photo © FAO/Giulio Napolitano)
    • The MAFAP methodologyPriceIncentivesPublicexpendituresPolicycoherence
    • Next steps• Consolidation and “graduation” in initialcountries• Expansion to additional countries• Methodological improvements• Expanded policy dialogue• Continuing role of FAO