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2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture
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2008-04-10 Intercontential Dust Transport Guest Lecture

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  • 1. Global Distribution and Transport of Air Pollution Presented at The Haagen-Smit Symposium: From Los Angeles to Global Air Pollution Lake Arrowhead, April 9-12, 2001 Rudolf Husar CAPITA, Washington University , St. Louis
  • 2. Background
    • Global-scale air pollution existed since…..
    • The difference is that now we can observe it!
    • Outline of Presentation
    • Major pollutant sources and emissions
    • Observation-based global chemical climatology of major gases and aerosols
    • Illustration of global-scale dust and smoke events
    • Opportunities and challenges of the the 21 st century
  • 3. Industrial Sulfur Emission Density
    • The regional hot-spots for industrial sulfur emissions are in
    • E. North America,
    • Europe and
    • E. Asia
    • Long Term Trends
    • North America : roughly constant for the past century
    • Europe: Rise after WW II but leveled off since 1990
    • East Asia: Sharp rise since the 1960s.
    Regional hot-spots for industrial sulfur emissions Eastern North America, Europe East Asia
  • 4. Continental Surface Visibility (Human Observers)
    • NOAA NCDC Global Summary of the Day (SOD) 7000 Observations
    Low Visibility High Visibility
  • 5. Extinction coefficient (visibility) for SE Asia
    • The most intense and persistent regional haze is over India
    During 1997 biomass fires in Indonesia caused unusually intense haze Sep, Oct, Nov Dec, Jan, Feb
  • 6.
    • The haze over N. America is modest compared to hazy regions of Africa, E. Asia and S. America
    Extinction coefficient (visibility) for N. America Jun, Jul, Aug Dec, Jan, Feb
  • 7. Haze over China SeaWiFS
    • Industrial haze covers most of Eastern China
    • Haze is confined to low-lying areas and valleys
  • 8. The Asian Dust Event of April 1998 On April 19, 1998 a major dust storm occurred over the Gobi Desert The dust cloud was seen through SeaWiFS, TOMS, GMS, AVHRR satellites The dust transport was followed on-line by an an ad-hoc international group China Mongolia Korea
  • 9. SeaWiFS/TOMS data for April 21 shows dust transport to the Pacific Japan
  • 10. Trans-Pacific Dust Transport The dust cloud traversed the Pacific in 6 days at about 4 km altitude As the dust approached N. America, it subsided to the ground
  • 11. Asian Dust Cloud over N. America On April 27, the dust cloud rolled into North America. The regional average PM10 increased to 65  g/m 3 In Washington State, PM10 exceeded 100  g/m 3 Reg. Avg. PM10 100  g/m 3 Hourly PM10
  • 12. Fine Particle Dust Concentrations (IMPROVE) April 25, 1998 April 29, 1998 May 2, 1998 On April 25, the western U.S. was virtually dust-free. Highest concentration was an April 29. On May 2, the high levels moved (?) to the Colorado Plateau.  
  • 13. Summary of Global Air Pollution and Transport
    • The global sulfur emissions have shifted from N. America and Europe to East Asia.
    • The industrial ‘belt’, 30-60 deg N, is dominated by anthropogenic SO x , NO x and O 3 . This conforms to the conventional wisdom since the 1970s.
    • Recent satellite data show that NO x , HC and aerosols are dominated by biomass burning in the subtropics and the southern hemisphere. ??
    • The radiatively active global aerosol is dominated by smoke and dust, rather then by industrial sulfates as we have presumed.
    • Episodic trans-continental transport of dust and smoke (ozone?) can now be detected and modeled routinely.
    • Such extra-jurisdictional ‘pollution’ events cause significant episodic impact on the air quality of N. America.

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