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IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
IRW Chapter 4
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IRW Chapter 4

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  • Visuals help writers explain difficult information in a simplified format that readers can understand. Visuals can condense lengthy and complicated information into terms that are easily interpretable in visual form—but would be difficult to understand if written in sentence/paragraph form.Activity:Using figure 4-1 on page 117 of In Concert, determine its function based on the above definitions. Explain how (or if) the figure does each of these things.
  • The title tells you about the situation or relationship being described. A legend is an explanatory caption that may accompany the visual. The legend may also be a key that explains what certain colors, lines, or pictures mean.Visuals such as tables and graphs may have headings or labels describing what they represent. Make sure you understand what each piece of the visual represents.Identify the pieces of information that are being compared to the relationship in the visual. Be sure to note any symbols or abbreviations.How are the visuals measured? Numbers? Percentages? Money?Identify information that shows similarities and differences in relationships.Footnotes provide additional information such as the source from which the information came or what certain terms/phrases mean.Make a note in the margin about the key point/idea the visual is emphasizing. This will be useful for review.
  • Visuals are generally accompanied by text that explains, summarizes, or analyzes the information presented. Be sure to examine the visual and text together. 2. Writers tell you when they want you to look at the visual by stating ”see figure 2-1” or “refer to the chart on page 2.”4. Refer back to the text as you examine the visual. The text will explain certain words/phrases in the visual.5. Ask questions such as: What should I learn from the visual? Why did the author include this visual? What new information does it contain? On what topics does the visual provide more detail?
  • Photographs introduce new ideas, add interest, help visualize a concept, and create emotional responses from readers. Captions can help readers interpret the photos.Activity: Using pictures 4-2 and 4-3 on page 120 of In Concert, ask that students explain what the visual is saying and how the visual assists in explaining the concept in a way words cannot.There are two types of maps. Locational maps show exact positions of physical objects and places. Thematic maps provide statistical or factual information about a specific place or region, such as average income for an area (see figure 4-4 on page 121 as an example). Look for trends or relationships between the information and certain places.Activity: See Exercise4-3 on page 122 to interpret the information in figure 4-4.Tables present facts, figures, statistics, and data in an organized, condensed format. Information is classified so it is quickly and easily readable (see figure 4-5 on page 122 for example). Determine how the data is divided, make comparisons, look for trends, and draw conclusions. Activity: Use Exercise 4-4 on page 123 to interpret figure 4-5.Graphs: Bar graphs compare amounts and quantities using bars of different lengths (see figure 4-6 on page 124). Activity: Exercise 4-5 on page 124. Stacked bar graphs (see figure 4-7 on page 125) show bars stacked on top of each other rather than side by side. These graphs show the components that make up the total. In line graphs (see figure 4-8 on page 126), information is plotted on a horizontal and vertical axis with one or more variables plotted on each axis. A line is drawn to connect the points. Line graphs are used to show data that occurs in sequence beginning with the earliest date and ending with the most recent. Activity: Exercise 4-6 on page 126 interpreting figure 4-8. Circle Graphs (see figure 4-9 on page 127) are also called pie charts. They are used to show whole/part relationships or show how parts of a unit have been divided or classified. Activity: Exercise 4-7 on page 128.5. Charts: Organizational Charts (see figure 4-11 on page 130) divide an organization such as a school or hospital into its administrative parts and lines of authority. Flow charts (see figure 4-12 on page 131) show how a process or procedure works. To read it, figure out what process is being shown, then follow the chart, using arrows to read each step. Describe the process in your own words when you finish.6. Infographics (see figure 4-13 on page 132) combine several visual aids into one, merging text with photos, diagrams, or tables. To read it, identify the subject and the “flow” or direction of the infographic. How is the information presented? How do the pictures and text interact? Activity: Exercise 4-10 on pages 133-134.7. Cartoons: Cartoons (see figure 4-14 on page 134) often add humor to a textbook or make a point quickly. They can make abstract ideas more real.Activity: Exercise 4-11 (page 135) Selecting an Appropriate Visual. Students must provide the best visual to explain the examples given. In addition, ask students to explain WHY they chose a particular visual. This can be done individually, in groups, or as an online reflection activity.
  • Writers often select photos or visuals that depict their personal beliefs. The visual has the effect of making the author’s point stronger. For example, if he or she is writing about the dangers of smoking, the author may include a photograph of smoke-damaged lungs. To think critically, one must determine how the visual is being used, if it is effective, and how others may interpret it. Is the visual targeted at a particular audience? Who might find the information useful?
  • Answer: C—Chapter Summary
  • Answer: C—Chapter Summary
  • Answer: D—All of the above
  • Answer: D—All of the above
  • Answers:1. True.2. False: You should move back and forth between the text and the visual for comprehension.
  • Answers:1. True.2. False: You should move back and forth between the text and the visual for comprehension.
  • Answer: C—Dotted
  • Answer: C—Dotted
  • Answer: True. The photo would force the reader to visualize the effects of texting and driving and create a relatable, emotional response.
  • Answer: True. The photo would force the reader to visualize the effects of texting and driving and create a relatable, emotional response.
  • Transcript

    • 1. In Concert: An Integrated Reading and Writing Approach by Kathleen T. McWhorter Part One: Introduction to Reading and Writing Chapter 4: Reading & Evaluating Visuals PowerPoint by Sarah Gilliam, Instructor of English Mountain Empire Community College
    • 2. Chapter 4: Reading and Evaluating Visuals Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 3. Visuals are pictures, charts, graphs, drawings, or graphics that present information in visual format. Visuals: • Consolidate information into and display it in an easyto-read format • Explain and illustrate • Dramatize information • Display trends, patterns, and information Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 4. How do I read a visual and understand it? Helpful Tip: Study visuals closely. They emphasize important facts, concepts, and trends. What are some strategies for reading and interpreting visuals? Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 5. 1. Read the title or caption and legend 2. Determine how the visual is organized 3. Determine what categories or quantities the visual is illustrating 4. Determine the scale or unit of measurement 5. Identify trends, patterns, or relationships 6. Read footnotes and identify the source 7. Make a brief summary note Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 6. Strategies for Integrating Text & Visuals 1. Preview the chapter and note the number and types of visuals 2. Refer to the visual when the author tells you to 3. Read the visual using the steps on page 118 4. Move back and forth between the text and visual 5. Determine why the author included the visual Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 7. Types of Visuals 1. Photographs 2. Maps: locational and thematic 3. Tables 4. Graphs: bar, stacked, line, and circle 5. Charts: organizational and flow charts 6. Infographics 7. Cartoons Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 8. How do I think critically about visuals? Consider: • Purpose of visual • Effectiveness of visual • How others might interpret it • If the visual is targeted at a specific audience • Who might relate to the information or use it Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 9. Goal 1: Understand the Function of Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is not an example of a visual? A. Pie Chart B. Photographs C. Chapter Summary D. Paintings
    • 10. Goal 1: Understand the Function of Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is not an example of a visual? A. Pie Chart B. Photographs C. Chapter Summary D. Paintings
    • 11. Goal 2:Read and Interpret Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is an effective strategy for reading and interpreting visuals? A. Making summary notes B. Determining the unit of measurement (percent, dollars, etc.) C. Reading footnotes D. All of the above Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 12. Goal 2: Read and Interpret Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is an effective strategy for reading and interpreting visuals? A. Making summary notes B. Determining the unit of measurement (percent, dollars, etc.) C. Reading footnotes D. All of the above Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 13. Goal 3: Integrate Text and Visuals Review Questions True or False: The author will often tell you when to refer to a visual in the text. True or False: I should read the text, then look at the visual. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 14. Goal 3: Integrate Text and Visuals Review Questions True or False: True: The author will often tell you when to refer to a visual in the text. True or False: False: I should read the text, then look at the visual. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 15. Goal 4: Read and Interpret Different Types of Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a type of visual graph? A. Line B. Bar C. Dotted D. Stacked Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 16. Goal 4: Read and Interpret Different Types of Visuals Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a type of visual graph? A. Line B. Bar C. Dotted D. Stacked Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 17. Goal 5: Think Critically About Visuals Review Questions True or False: Including a photo of a car accident with an article about text messaging while driving would be an effective way to express the dangers of texting and driving. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 18. Goal 5: Think Critically About Visuals Review Questions True or False: True: Including a photo of a car accident with an article about text messaging while driving would be an effective way to express the dangers of texting and driving. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

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