IRW Chapter 3

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  • In college, you must learn information from your textbooks. Simply rereading the book to learn it is NOT an effective strategy. Writing during or after reading is an effective strategy to learn the material.Writing focuses your attention because writing about something as you read it keeps your attention on the topic at hand.Writing forces you to think. Highlighting or taking notes forces you to decide what information is important and understand relationships and connections.Writing tests your understanding. If you can read a passage and then write about it in your own words, you have an understanding of the material. If you do not understand it, you will be at a loss for words.Writing facilitates recall. Writing is a form of elaboration, which means to expand your thoughts on the material by making associations, connections, seeing relationships, and applying what you have learned.
  • Most textbooks are written by experienced college professors. They understand the subject matter and the students. These authors know how to explain topics so they are understandable to students. Table 3-1 on page 86 of In Concert explains some of the different parts of textbooks and how to use them.
  • On this slide are just a few of the important features of textbooks. Refer to the chart on page 86 for an understanding of how to use these and other textbook features.Examples:Preface: Explains how the book is organized and what it contains.Chapter Outlines, Objectives, Goals: Read to find out what a chapter is about and use later to test yourself to see if you can recall the main points.Pictures and Graphics: Determine their purpose (what is important about them). Take notes about them and try to re-create the visuals later without referring back to them.Review Questions/Problems: Read them before reading the chapter so you know what is important to learn. Use them after reading the chapter to test your knowledge.Chapter Summary: Test yourself by turning the summary statements into questions using who, what, where, when, why, and how.Chapter Test/Quiz: Use this to prepare for the exam and pay extra attention to the parts you get wrong.Activity:Using chart 3-1 on page 86, make notes on which of these features you see in In Concert. Which do you think will be the most helpful and why? (Can use this as a 5-10 minute journal activity or preface to a class discussion on the topic).
  • The SQ3R system helps you to integrate reading with learning rather than reading now and studying for a test later. Using this system will help strengthen comprehension and retain more of what is read. You may have to practice with the system a few times before you get the hang of it.Survey: Become familiar with the material’s content and organization using the previewing steps from page 15 of Chapter One.Question: Ask questions about the material as you read. Turn the headings of each section into a question.Read: As you read, search for answers to your guide questions. When you find the answers, highlight or mark the sections that clearly state the information.Recite: After each major section or heading, stop reading. Look away from the material and try to remember the answer to your question. If you cannot remember, refer back to the reading. Test yourself again by looking away from the page and reciting the material.Review: When you finish reading, go back through the material and read the headings and the summaries. As you read each heading, try to recall your question and test yourself to see if you remember the answer. If you cannot remember, reread that section. Do this until you are satisfied you understand the material. Then, move on to higher level thinking—questions that involve analysis and applying the material.Activity:Apply the SQ3R system to a chapter in the textbook. Have students write the questions on a sheet of paper to turn in, compare questions as a group activity, post them to a discussion board/thread online (they can comment on other classmates’ questions), or write them as a journal activity.
  • Pages 87–90 of your textbook describe effective strategies to help you remember what you’ve studied.(See next slide)
  • Pages 87–90 of your textbook describe effective strategies to help you remember what you’ve studied:Immediate review means reviewing information as soon as possible after you read or hear it, such as reviewing lecture notes after you take them.Periodic review means returning to previously learned information and reviewing it on a regular basis. For example, you may need to review a certain math formula from the first chapter to apply it to material in other chapters.Final review means a quick last check or review of material before a test or exam.Building an intent to remember: When reading an assignment, define as clearly as possible what you intend to learn or remember. What information is important or necessary for the test? What are the key ideas, and why did the author include them?Organizing and categorizing: Organizing information is to give it a kind of pattern or structure. Categorizing it means to arrange it in groups with similar characteristics (see example on page 89). This allows you to put similar ideas together, making them organized and easier to recall.Associating ideas means connecting the information you are reading with ideas or information you already know. Using a variety of sensory modes means applying the five senses (sight, touch, taste, smell, hearing) to the material you are learning. Highlight is a form of touch. Some students find repeating or hearing the information makes it easier to remember. Students who are visual learners may create idea maps or focus on pictures/graphs to retain the information.Visualizing means creating a visual depiction (such as comparative lists, idea maps, etc.) to help remember the information. Using mnemonic devices means to use memorization techniques or memory devices to remember information. Rhymes or acronyms are examples of mnemonic devices. The phrase “SQ3R” learned earlier in this chapter is a mnemonic device.Activity:Refer to Exercise 3-3 on page 90 of In Concert. Students are presented with five situations and must apply the correct strategy to each one. One way to do this would be to split the class in five groups and assign a question to each group. Have the students not only indicate which strategy they feel would be most effective, but also WHY they feel it would be the best choice. Answers may be done as a class discussion or as an online discussion activity.Other activity:Have students post an online discussion about which 2-3 strategies they find most effective and why. This is a good reflective activity.
  • Highlighting: Highlighting is identifying key pieces of information. Read a section of your text, and then go back and highlight the information you think is important. Highlight the important parts of topic sentences and any supporting details. Make sure you highlight enough information—but don’t overdo it. Highlighting too much means you are not focusing on the important ideas (see examples on pages 91-92).Annotate: Annotating is recording your thoughts about important pieces of information (like those you highlighted). In the margins of your text, you may record questions, examples, inconsistencies, disagreements, and judgments about the information (see examples on page 94).Map: We learned a bit about mapping in Chapter 1 with idea maps. Mapping is a visual way of organizing information. It involves creating diagrams to show how ideas are connected. Maps may be handwritten or computer generated. Maps identify the main topic and identify major ideas related to it. The map then connects supporting details to the major ideas (see pages 96-98 for examples of different maps).Outline: Outlining involves listing major and minor ideas and showing how they are related. Outlines follow the writer’s organization from beginning to end. They do not need a specific format, and you may use key words and phrases instead of complete sentences. Following the headings is a good way to structure an outline (see pages 99-102 for outline examples).Paraphrase: A paraphrase is a restatement in your own words of all the key points of a passage, paragraph, or section of a reading. It is a condensed rewording of the selection (see pages 102–104 for examples of paraphrasing).Summarize: A summary is a brief statement of the main points of the reading that is always shorter than the original reading itself. Unlike paraphrasing, it does not need to cover all of the key details. It briefly states the major points and ideas (see pages 105–108 for examples of summarizing).Activity: Break students into six groups. Provide them all the same passage. Ask each group to apply one of the listed techniques and teach it to the class. They can present it in the classroom, or this could be an activity that is posted online. This is a good way for the students to interact with the information cooperatively and teach it to each other.
  • Selective reading: Learn to skim the material to see what interests you, and read the material that does (college and work assignments are the exception to this rule).Understand the goal of what you’re reading: What is the purpose of the selection? To educate? To convince you? Determine the writer’s goal.Adjust reading speed: If you’re reading a magazine, it’s fine to read quickly. However, important paperwork or college assignments must be read carefully and slowly to ensure accuracy.When dealing with important paperwork, look to see if important information is buried within in small print. Never sign anything you’ve not fully read.
  • Answer: A—Writing facilitates recall—remembering of the material, not memorization of it.
  • Answer: A—Writing facilitates recall—remembering of the material, not memorization of it.
  • Answer: E—All of the above
  • Answer: E—All of the above
  • Answer: C—Read, Recite, Review
  • Answer: C—Read, Recite, Review
  • Answers:TrueFalse—Immediate review means to review the material immediately after reading or hearing it. Final review means to review material right before a test or exam.
  • Answers:TrueFalse—Immediate review means to review the material immediately after reading or hearing it. Final review means to review material right before a test or exam.
  • Answer: D—Rereading the selection
  • Answer: D—Rereading the selection: You may have to reread the selection to apply one of the other strategies, but rereading on its own is not an effective strategy.
  • Answer:1. False. Important readings such as college assignments or financial paperwork should be read slowly for understanding. 2. True: Read ALL parts of paperwork before signing it to ensure you understand the terms and conditions.
  • Answer:1. False. Important readings such as college assignments or financial paperwork should be read slowly for understanding. 2. True: Read ALL parts of paperwork before signing it to ensure you understand the terms and conditions.
  • IRW Chapter 3

    1. 1. In Concert: An Integrated Reading and Writing Approach by Kathleen T. McWhorter Part One: Introduction to Reading and Writing Chapter 3: Reading and Learning From Textbooks PowerPoint by Sarah Gilliam, Instructor of English Mountain Empire Community College
    2. 2. Chapter 3: Reading and Learning from Textbooks Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Why should I write when I read or study? 1. Writing focuses your attention 2. Writing forces you to think 3. Writing tests your understanding 4. Writing facilitates recall Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Textbooks are really long! How do I learn all of that information? Helpful Tip: Know the different parts of a textbook and how to effectively use each of them. Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. Important Textbook Features (see chart 3-1 on page 86) Preface Chapter Outlines, Objectives, Goals Pictures and Graphics Review Questions or Problems Chapter Summary Chapter Review Test or Quiz Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. Survey Question Read Recite Review Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. How do I remember what I study? Helpful Tip: Find a learning/recall strategy that works for you. What are some effective learning and recall strategies? Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. • Immediate Review • Periodic Review • Final Review • Building an Intent to Remember • Organizing and Categorizing • Associating Ideas • Using Various Sensory Modes • Visualizing • Using Mnemonic Devices Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. How do I organize what I need to learn? • Highlight • Annotate • Map • Outline • Paraphrase • Summarize Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. How do I know what information to use from the textbook? • Practice selective reading • Understand the goal of what you’re reading • Adjust your reading speed to match the task • Read the “fine print” Copyright 2014 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. Goal 1: Use Writing as a Learning Tool Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a reason for using writing as learning tool? A. Writing facilitates memorization B. Writing tests your understanding C. Writing focuses your attention D. Writing forces you to think
    12. 12. Goal 1: Use Writing as a Learning Tool Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a reason for using writing as learning tool? A. Writing facilitates memorization B. Writing tests your understanding C. Writing focuses your attention D. Writing forces you to think
    13. 13. Goal 2: Use Strategies for Reading Textbooks Review Questions Which of the following are important sections of a textbook? A. Chapter Test B. Charts C. Discussion Questions D. Chapter Goals and Outlines E. All of the above
    14. 14. Goal 2: Use Strategies for Reading Textbooks Review Questions Which of the following are important sections of a textbook? A. Chapter Test B. Charts C. Discussion Questions D. Chapter Goals and Outlines E. All of the above
    15. 15. Goal 3: Use the SQ3R System Review Questions The 3 R’s in the SQ3R system stand for: A. Read, Recite, Remember B. Read, Review, Retain C. Read, Recite, Review D. Read, Remember, Repeat
    16. 16. Goal 3: Use the SQ3R System Review Questions The 3 R’s in the SQ3R system stand for: A. Read, Recite, Remember B. Read, Review, Retain C. Read, Recite, Review D. Read, Remember, Repeat
    17. 17. Goal 4: Use Learning and Recall Strategies Review Questions True or False: Rhymes and acronyms are examples of mnemonic devices. True or False: Immediate Review means reviewing the material right before an exam or test.
    18. 18. Goal 4: Use Learning and Recall Strategies Review Questions True or False: True: Rhymes and acronyms are examples of mnemonic devices. True or False: False: Immediate Review means reviewing the material right before an exam or test.
    19. 19. Goal 5: Select and Organize What to Learn Review Questions Which of the following is NOT a strategy for selecting and organizing what to learn from a textbook? A. B. C. D. Mapping Annotating Paraphrasing Rereading the selection
    20. 20. Goal 5: Select and Organize What to Learn Review Questions Which of the following is NOT an effective strategy for selecting and organizing what to learn from a textbook? A. B. C. D. Mapping Annotating Paraphrasing Rereading the selection
    21. 21. Goal 6: Thinking Critically About Information in Textbooks Review Questions True or False: Reading through information quickly is an effective strategy for critical thinking. True or False: Reading the “fine print” or smaller text in important paperwork is necessary to understand the material.
    22. 22. Goal 6: Thinking Critically About Information in Textbooks Review Questions True or False: False: Reading through information quickly is an effective strategy for critical thinking. True or False: True: Reading the “fine print” or smaller text in important paperwork is necessary to understand the material.

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