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V49 Chapter 8 Identifying Market Segments and Targets - Kotler

V49 Chapter 8 Identifying Market Segments and Targets - Kotler

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Andal final 042410 agsb batch 8 mkt 640 kotler mm_13e_basic_08 Andal final 042410 agsb batch 8 mkt 640 kotler mm_13e_basic_08 Presentation Transcript

  • Identifying Market Segments and Targets Marketing Management, 13 th ed 8
  • OUTLINE: Chapter Questions
    • What are the different levels of market segmentation?
    • How can a company divide a market into segments?
    • How should a company choose the most attractive target markets?
    • What are the requirements for effective segmentation?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
  • Effective Targeting Requires…
    • Identify
        • Market Segmentation
    • Select
        • Market Targeting
    • Establish
        • Market Positioning
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8- View slide
  • Levels of Target Segmentation
    • Mass Production = one product for all
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8- View slide
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments Local areas Individuals Niches
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments similar needs and wants
  • Basic Market Preference Segments Homogeneous preferences exist when consumers want the same things
  • Basic Market Preference Segments Diffused preferences exist when consumers want very different things
  • Basic Market Preference Segments Clustered preferences reveal natural segments from groups with shared preferences
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments similar needs and wants
  • Flexible Marketing Offerings
    • Naked solution : Product and service elements that all segment members value
    • Discretionary options : Some segment members value options but not all
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments Local areas Individuals Niches
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Niches sub-segments with a distinctive mix of benefits “ guerillas against gorillas”
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments Local areas Individuals Niches
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Local areas tailored to the needs and wants of local customer groups in trading areas, neighborhoods, individual stores
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Segments Local areas Individuals Niches
  • Four levels of Micromarketing Individuals segments of one (i.e., one-to-one marketing)
  • Customerization Combines operationally driven mass customization with customized marketing in a way that EMPOWERS CONSUMERS to design the product and service offering of their choice.
  • Examples of Market Customerization
  • Segmenting Consumer Markets Geographic Demographic Psychographic Behavioral
  • Demographic Segmentation Age and Life Cycle Life Stage Gender Income Generation Social Class
  • Psychographic Segmentation: The VALS Segmentation System
  • Behavioral Segmentation
    • Decision Roles
    • Initiator
    • Influencer
    • Decider
    • Buyer
    • User
  • Behavioral Segmentation Breakdown
  • Patterns of Target Market Selection 8-
  • Patterns of Target Market Selection 8-
  • Patterns of Target Market Selection 8-
  • Patterns of Target Market Selection 8-
  • Patterns of Target Market Selection 8-
  • Segmenting for Business Markets Demographic Operating Variable Purchasing Approaches Situational Factors Personal Characteristics
  • Segmenting for Business Markets
    • Demographic segmentation
        • Industry, company size, location
    • Operating variables
            • Technology, usage status, customer capabilities
    • Purchasing approaches
    • Purchasing Criteria
    • Situational factors
            • Urgency, specific application, size of order
    • Personal characteristics
      • Buyer-seller similarity, attitudes toward risk, loyalty
  • Effective Segmentation Criteria
    • Size, purchasing power, profiles
    • of segments can be measured.
    • Segments can be effectively
    • reached and served.
    • Segments are large or profitable enough to serve.
    Measurable Accessible Substantial Differential Actionable
    • Segments must respond differently to different marketing mix elements & programs.
    • Effective programs can be designed to attract and serve the segments.
  • Mature consumers are a rapidly growing market 8-
  • Effective Segmentation Criteria
    • Size, purchasing power, profiles
    • of segments can be measured.
    • Segments can be effectively
    • reached and served.
    • Segments are large or profitable enough to serve.
    Measurable Accessible Substantial Differential Actionable
    • Segments must respond differently to different marketing mix elements & programs.
    • Effective programs can be designed to attract and serve the segments.
  • SUMMARY: Chapter Questions
    • What are the different levels of market segmentation?
    • How can a company divide a market into segments?
    • How should a company choose the most attractive target markets?
    • What are the requirements for effective segmentation?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
  • Chapter Questions
    • What are the different levels of market segmentation?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8- Segments Local areas Individuals Niches
  • Chapter Questions
    • How can a company divide a market into segments?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8- Geographic Demographic Psychographic Behavioral
  • Chapter Questions
    • How should a company choose the most attractive target markets?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8- Demographic Operating Variable Purchasing Approaches Situational Factors Personal Characteristics
  • Chapter Questions
    • How should a company choose the most attractive target markets?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
  • Chapter Questions
    • What are the requirements for effective segmentation?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
    • Size, purchasing power, profiles
    • of segments can be measured.
    • Segments can be effectively
    • reached and served.
    • Segments are large or profitable enough to serve.
    Measurable Accessible Substantial Differential Actionable
    • Segments must respond differently to different marketing mix elements & programs.
    • Effective programs can be designed to attract and serve the segments.
  • Chapter Questions
    • How should a company choose the most attractive target markets?
    Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.  Publishing as Prentice Hall 8-
    • Size, purchasing power, profiles
    • of segments can be measured.
    • Segments can be effectively
    • reached and served.
    • Segments are large or profitable enough to serve.
    Measurable Accessible Substantial Differential Actionable
    • Segments must respond differently to different marketing mix elements & programs.
    • Effective programs can be designed to attract and serve the segments.
  • Maraming Salamat Po! 8- "Men are born to succeed, not fail.“ Henry David Thoreau