DSLR Video Planning and Shooting

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Learn about the process of planning for and creating a DSLR video project.

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DSLR Video Planning and Shooting

  1. 1. DSLR VIDEO PLANNING AND SHOOTING Richard Harrington – Author, From Still to Motion & Creating DSLR Video – RHED Pixel linkedin.com/in/ richardharrington facebook.com/ RichHarringtonStuff youtube.com/ rhedpixeltv twitter.com/ rhedpixel Tuesday, September 3, 13
  2. 2. Richard Harrington ‣ RHED Pixel (www.rhedpixel.com) ‣ Adobe Certified Expert & Trainer ‣ Apple Certified Instructor ‣ NAPP Instructor ‣ Creative COW ‣ Project Management Professional ‣ Consult on digital media production and web content Tuesday, September 3, 13
  3. 3. From Still to Motion ‣ A photographer’s guide to creating video with your DSLR ‣ Full color case study with hands-on activities ‣ 6+ hours of training videos ‣ www.peachpit.com/stilltomotion ‣ Free sample – tinyurl.com/fs2msample Tuesday, September 3, 13
  4. 4. Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots ‣ Designed for new users and solo shooters ‣ Maximize gear you own and grow on a tight budget ‣ Situation-based learning ‣ http://tinyurl.com/dslrvideobook ‣ Free sample posted Tuesday, September 3, 13
  5. 5. An Editor's Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro ‣ Designed for experienced editors ‣ Make the move from Final Cut Pro or Avid ‣ Professional workflow ‣ www.peachpit.com/premiereguide ‣ Over 6 hours of video ‣ Free sample posted Tuesday, September 3, 13
  6. 6. richardharringtonblog.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
  7. 7. photofocus.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
  8. 8. About You Tuesday, September 3, 13
  9. 9. About You ‣ Photographer Tuesday, September 3, 13
  10. 10. About You ‣ Photographer ‣ Videographer Tuesday, September 3, 13
  11. 11. About You ‣ Photographer ‣ Videographer ‣ Designer/Motion Graphics Artist Tuesday, September 3, 13
  12. 12. About You ‣ Photographer ‣ Videographer ‣ Designer/Motion Graphics Artist ‣ Educator Tuesday, September 3, 13
  13. 13. About You ‣ Photographer ‣ Videographer ‣ Designer/Motion Graphics Artist ‣ Educator ‣ Business Owner Tuesday, September 3, 13
  14. 14. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  15. 15. Why Shoot DSLR Video The Benefits of DSLR Video Tuesday, September 3, 13
  16. 16. AESTHETIC BENEFITS ‣ Great Depth of Field ‣ Filmic Image ‣ Creatively Invigorating ‣ Smaller Profile Tuesday, September 3, 13
  17. 17. . Depth of Field Tuesday, September 3, 13
  18. 18. . Depth of Field Tuesday, September 3, 13
  19. 19. Depth of Field Tuesday, September 3, 13
  20. 20. FILMIC IMAGE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  21. 21. . FILMIC IMAGE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  22. 22. FILMIC IMAGE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  23. 23. Technical Benefits ‣ Lens Selection ‣ Lowlight Performance ‣ Smaller Profile ‣ Tapeless Workflow Tuesday, September 3, 13
  24. 24. LENS SELECTION Tuesday, September 3, 13
  25. 25. LENS SELECTION Tuesday, September 3, 13
  26. 26. LOW LIGHT PERFORMANCE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  27. 27. LOW LIGHT PERFORMANCE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  28. 28. LOW LIGHT PERFORMANCE Tuesday, September 3, 13
  29. 29. . Smaller Profile Tuesday, September 3, 13
  30. 30. Smaller Profile Tuesday, September 3, 13
  31. 31. TAPELESS WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  32. 32. TAPELESS WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  33. 33. TAPELESS WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  34. 34. THe CONS ‣ Tapeless Workflow ‣ Sync Sound Workflow ‣ Add-on Gear Essential ‣ New Skills ‣ Focus is Difficult Tuesday, September 3, 13
  35. 35. TAPELESS WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  36. 36. SYNC SOUND WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  37. 37. SYNC SOUND WORKFLOW Tuesday, September 3, 13
  38. 38. ADD ON GEAR ESSENTIAL Tuesday, September 3, 13
  39. 39. ADD ON GEAR ESSENTIAL Tuesday, September 3, 13
  40. 40. ADD ON GEAR ESSENTIAL Tuesday, September 3, 13
  41. 41. Technical Essentials A Crash Course in Video Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  48. 48. Frame Rate Options Tuesday, September 3, 13
  49. 49. Frame Rate Options ‣ 60 fps (59.94 fps) Common frame rate for 720p HD Can be used for overcranking Tuesday, September 3, 13
  50. 50. Frame Rate Options ‣ 60 fps (59.94 fps) Common frame rate for 720p HD Can be used for overcranking ‣ 30 fps (really 29.97 fps) The most common frame rate for broadcast in the U.S. and other Tuesday, September 3, 13
  51. 51. Frame Rate Options ‣ 60 fps (59.94 fps) Common frame rate for 720p HD Can be used for overcranking ‣ 30 fps (really 29.97 fps) The most common frame rate for broadcast in the U.S. and other ‣ 25 fps The common frame rate of video used in Europe and around the world that use the PAL standard. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  52. 52. Frame Rate Options ‣ 60 fps (59.94 fps) Common frame rate for 720p HD Can be used for overcranking ‣ 30 fps (really 29.97 fps) The most common frame rate for broadcast in the U.S. and other ‣ 25 fps The common frame rate of video used in Europe and around the world that use the PAL standard. ‣ 24 fps (23.98 fps) A rate that closely matches that of film Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  54. 54. Full Frame Sensor Cropped Sensor Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  59. 59. In this business... You will Live OFF Your Gear & Die WHEN it Fails Tuesday, September 3, 13
  60. 60. Selecting Lenses Cinema Has Different Demands Tuesday, September 3, 13
  61. 61. Selecting Lenses ‣ You've may have invested in a set of specific lenses that work well for your style of photography. We recommend that you immediately move these lenses into a video workflow and try them out. ‣ When selecting additional lenses for video work, you’ll need to be more varied in your choices. ‣ You’ll likely want range... the ultra wide lens, a super fast lens for lowlight shooting, and an ultra long lens to capture far away action. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  62. 62. Adapting a lens to your mount ‣ Collecting good lenses can be a life- long pursuit by a lot of folks. ‣ There are lots of companies that make adapters that allow you to put a lens from one manufacture on a body from another. ‣ No auto-focusing capabilities. ‣ You'll also lose additional lens features like image stabilization. ‣ Fotodiox and Novoflex Tuesday, September 3, 13
  63. 63. Focal Length ‣ 10mm – 35mm – depending on the body you’re using lenses in this range can are a go to for wide-angle shots. ‣ Lot of action in a scene ‣ Establishing shots for a scene. ‣ Let you see the big picture without having to remove yourself a great distance away from the action. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  64. 64. Focal Length ‣ 50mm -100mm – Lenses in this focal range work great for portraits and interviews. ‣ Be sure that you think abut the effect of the closeup on your subject. ‣ Do you need makeup? Is the lighting flattering? ‣ Lenses of this length can start to show tiny details you may want to avoid. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  65. 65. Focal Length ‣ 200mm plus – Long telephoto lenses are great for compressing the background of scene ‣ Are also ideal when you want to let action unfold in front of you without having to actually be in the action. ‣ Additionally we love long telephoto lenses to get up-close shots of hands, facial reactions and small details that really help tell a story. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  66. 66. Aperture and Lens Choice ‣ One of your main concerns is getting the fastest lens that you can afford ‣ Fast lenses allow you to work in low light and be able to still freeze action as you can work with a faster shutter speed and lower ISOs ‣ Fast lenses offer a wider apertures (f/1.8, f/1.2 and so on) the ability to leverage that amazing depth of field characteristics of a DSLR sensor Tuesday, September 3, 13
  67. 67. Aperture and Lens Choice ‣ Faster lens have one major issue – price. Fast lenses are expensive but having a few in your bag is essential for photo and video work. ‣ Trying to use lenses that have an aperture of f/2.8 or wider. ‣ If you’ll be doing work that always has quite a bit of light available (like when working outdoors) than an aperture of f/ 4 should work just fine and those lenses have the benefit of being cheaper. Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  69. 69. Aperture and Lens Choice ‣ Where is the aperture control for the lens. Some lenses have an aperture ring alongside the focus and zoom rings. ‣ This allows you to precisely control aperture during a shot and is very useful when you need to stop down in a situation like walking from indoors to outside. ‣ Other lenses have electronic aperture control, meaning that aperture is controlled on the actual camera body. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  70. 70. Selecting a Camera Body What to Choose When It’s Video You Want Tuesday, September 3, 13
  71. 71. Selecting a Camera Body ‣ Which video enabled DSLR you choose is largely a matter of personal preference ‣ We highly recommend you actually try out or test a camera before deciding on purchasing it ‣ You can't do much with the footage if the camera doesn’t shoot the frame rate or resolution that your project requires Tuesday, September 3, 13
  72. 72. Ergonomics ‣ How the camera feels in your hands is an important part of choosing a video enabled DSLR. ‣ Size – The body you choose should fit your hands well. ‣ Weight – Pro bodies (or bodies that have battery grips installed) tend to be heavier which provides a nice counter balance to longer lenses. Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  74. 74. Sensor Resolution ‣ When it comes to sensor resolution and video, don't let the megapixel count influence your choice of a camera body. ‣ Choose a camera body that meets the megapixel requirements of your still images and don’t worry about sensor resolution for video. ‣ The 21.1 megapixel Canon 5D MKII that has a max resolution of 5616 x 3744 when taking still photos. ‣ When shooting video at 1920 x 1080, your effective megapixel count is only 2.1 megapixels! Tuesday, September 3, 13
  75. 75. Full Frame Vs. Cropped Sensors ‣ A full frame sensor is one that matches the size of a 35mm film frame and the sensor is approximately 36mm x 24mm. ‣ Manufactures like Canon, Nikon and Panasonic have different sizes for their cropped sensors or smaller sensors but generally adhere to standardized sizes based on the APS (advanced photo system). ‣ Cropped (or smaller) sensors multiply the focal range of any given lens. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  76. 76. Full Frame Vs. Cropped Sensors ‣ As a general rule of thumb, the larger the sensor the greater the influence on depth of field (DOF). ‣ Put simply, a larger sensor will allow you to blur the background easier than a smaller sensor with the same lens. ‣ A driving force in the popularity of video DSLRs is that their sensors are gigantic. Those large sensors allow for a much greater control in the depth of field (which many equate to a cinematic look). Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  78. 78. Crop Factors ‣ 1.3 – Crop factor used by Canon on some of their 1-series bodies that use a APS – H sensor like the 1D Mark ‣ 1.5 – Crop factor is employed by Nikon for all of its non-full frame ‣ 1.6 – This crop factor is used by Canon for their APS-C bodies like the 7D and the Digital Rebel ‣ 2.0 – A large crop factor ratio that’s used by Micro Four Thirds image sensors like the one featured on the Panasonic Lumix GH1 DSLR Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  80. 80. THe GeaR You’ll NEED Some Must and Nice To Haves Tuesday, September 3, 13
  81. 81. MUST HAVES ‣ Fluid-Head Tripod ‣ Viewfinder ‣ Audio Recording Device with Microphone Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  87. 87. NICE TO HAVES ‣ Camera Support ‣ Fast Lenses ‣ Follow Focus ‣ External Monitor ‣ Electronic Viewfinder ‣ Lights ‣ Matte Box Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  92. 92. SMALL HD Panasonic via AJA Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  96. 96. Powering the Camera Without power, you’re dead Tuesday, September 3, 13
  97. 97. Powering the Camera ‣ When shooting video, your camera will need much more power than you usually use when just shooting stills. ‣ First, you’ll be using the Live View function of the camera – which means powering the LCD continuously ‣ Second, to record video, your camera’s processors and memory card are working all the time. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  98. 98. Live View Power Considerations ‣ Your camera’s default settings for the live view mode includes shutting it off after a couple minutes. Leave this as is. ‣ It’s essential to have additional batteries with you when shooting video. ‣ Pack five batteries per shooting day for each camera body. ‣ If charging batteries is an easy option, you can get by with less (3 per camera) Tuesday, September 3, 13
  99. 99. Using a Battery Grip ‣ Two batteries are in use. ‣ Sometimes one is contained in the grip and one in the camera body. Other times, two are in the grip itself. ‣ This added power is great for shooting video because you’ll be using the live view mode on your camera all the time. ‣ A battery grips often allows you to change batteries quickly since the battery door is located on the rear or side of the grip. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  100. 100. Tethered Power ‣ If you are in a studio or other location where AC power is available for a longer period of time, an AC power adapter is a good alternative ‣ The only downside to them is that it limits camera movement, especially if you are on a jib or dolly. ‣ We'll often power a camera with AC power for stationary shots (like interviews), then switch to a battery when on the go. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  101. 101. Camera Monitoring Knowing what you’re getting Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  107. 107. Sync Sound Workflow Audio will Often Come from Two Sources Tuesday, September 3, 13
  108. 108. Why record dual sound? Tuesday, September 3, 13
  109. 109. Why record dual sound? ‣ Internal microphone quality Tuesday, September 3, 13
  110. 110. Why record dual sound? ‣ Internal microphone quality ‣ Automatic Gain Control Tuesday, September 3, 13
  111. 111. Why record dual sound? ‣ Internal microphone quality ‣ Automatic Gain Control ‣ Difficulty in monitoring Tuesday, September 3, 13
  112. 112. Why record dual sound? ‣ Internal microphone quality ‣ Automatic Gain Control ‣ Difficulty in monitoring ‣ Challenge to keep constant levels Tuesday, September 3, 13
  113. 113. Dual Sound WOrkflow ‣ Use sync source ‣ Record enhanced camera audio ‣ Record “real” sound with professional microphones plugged into a mixer ‣ Record to file-based recorder ‣ Monitor properly ‣ Synchronize in postproduction Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  124. 124. PluralEyes ‣ Place video on one track and audio on another track ‣ Files are synced based on sound, no timecode required ‣ Audio levels can be normalized ‣ Huge timesaver ‣ www.redgiantsoftware.com $199 Tuesday, September 3, 13
  125. 125. Exposure Triangle Understanding the relationship between settings Tuesday, September 3, 13
  126. 126. Impact of Light and Motion on Focus ‣ If you’re shooting a lot of motion, pay close attention to both the amount of light as well as the quality of light ‣ The less light that’s available, the larger an aperture you’ll have to use in order to record a properly exposed image. ‣ This means that your depth of field will decrease and it will be much harder to keep your subject in focus. ‣ If you or your subject are moving, it get’s even more tricky Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  130. 130. The Window ‣ Imagine your camera is a window with shutters that open and close. ‣ Aperture is the size of the window. If it’s bigger more light gets through. ‣ Shutter Speed is the amount of time that the shutters are open. The longer they’re open, the more that comes in. ‣ Inside the room and are wearing sunglasses. Your eyes become desensitized to the light that comes in (like a low ISO). Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  145. 145. Going into a location without scouting is like shooting with your eyes closed Tuesday, September 3, 13
  146. 146. Why Plan An overlooked but critical step Tuesday, September 3, 13
  147. 147. The Purpose ‣ Productions are expensive ventures, you want to maximize productivity. ‣ Preplanning asks the questions and determines the solutions before that expensive day comes. ‣ Takes the concept on paper and puts a real world face on it ‣ Have a game plan in advance, schedule, shot list, etc. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  148. 148. Site Survey Assembling the right team Tuesday, September 3, 13
  149. 149. Who Goes? ‣ Producer ‣ Director ‣ Director Of Photography ‣ Location Manager ‣ Art Director ‣ Electric ‣ Additional department heads Tuesday, September 3, 13
  150. 150. Why? ‣ Everybody has a different set of needs. ‣ Someone has to be responsible to fulfill all of the informational needs. ‣ Must be prepared to answer questions essential crew might have the day of the shoot (or before). ‣ Easier to plan for problems than solve on the fly. Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  164. 164. Gear to Bring On Site Survey Essential equipment Tuesday, September 3, 13
  165. 165. Digital Camera ‣ Visualize the physical space. Ceiling height, windows, floors, lighting, wall color, obstructions, access... wide shots that show everything. ‣ Pre-visualize shots. Lenses and aspect ratio as close to the real format you will shoot. Your DSLR makes this easy! ‣ You can sample depth of field to hide background, check for color compatibility, check requirements of camera placement, some idea of light quality and placement. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  166. 166. iPhone ‣ PanaScout ‣ Cinemek Storyboard ‣ Compass ‣ A Level ‣ Focalware ‣ The Weather Chanel Tuesday, September 3, 13
  167. 167. Panascout Tuesday, September 3, 13
  168. 168. CINEMEK Tuesday, September 3, 13
  169. 169. FocalwAre Tuesday, September 3, 13
  170. 170. Sunseeker Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  172. 172. Measuring tools ‣ Compass ‣ Inclinometer ‣ SunPath software ‣ Calculate sun direction, position, shadow angle for given shoot day. ‣ SunPath ‣ Helios Tuesday, September 3, 13
  173. 173. Digital Audio Recorder ‣ Record room tone ‣ Useful for evaluation later ‣ Can detect problem audio that often goes unnoticed Tuesday, September 3, 13
  174. 174. The Internet ‣ Because you’ll always need to look something up ‣ Laptop ‣ Smart Phone ‣ iPad Tuesday, September 3, 13
  175. 175. What to Accomplish ON Your Site Survey Don’t leave until you get these things done... Tuesday, September 3, 13
  176. 176. Technical ‣ Find the main power box ‣ Identify power distribution throughout the building ‣ Locate building engineer ‣ Identify necessary connectors for power ‣ Examine fuses and identify maximum load for circuits ‣ Check if wall sockets are grounded ‣ Check wall outlets with circuit testers ‣ Determine cable runs and amount of cable needed Tuesday, September 3, 13
  177. 177. Sun Calculations ‣ Determine sunpath for given shoot day ‣ Determine shadow heights (if needed) for specific times of day ‣ Identify sunrise, twilight, dusk, and sunset ‣ Use software or application Tuesday, September 3, 13
  178. 178. Weather ‣ Weather forecasts ‣ Backup location if shooting outdoors ‣ Staging area for gear and crew ‣ Rain gear ‣ Pop-up tents for protecting gear and crew Tuesday, September 3, 13
  179. 179. Sound Considerations ‣ Listen for extraneous sounds that may be present on shoot day ‣ Record room tone for analysis ‣ Determine if control over HVAC ‣ Evaluate control via scheduling time of day Tuesday, September 3, 13
  180. 180. ART Direction ‣ Anything to move ‣ Anything to bring ‣ Propping ‣ Set alterations ‣ Practical lighting Tuesday, September 3, 13
  181. 181. What To Plan for Creatively Open your eyes and good things can be found... Tuesday, September 3, 13
  182. 182. What To Plan for Creatively Tuesday, September 3, 13
  183. 183. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position Tuesday, September 3, 13
  184. 184. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position ‣ Lens selection Tuesday, September 3, 13
  185. 185. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position ‣ Lens selection ‣ Lighting decisions Tuesday, September 3, 13
  186. 186. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position ‣ Lens selection ‣ Lighting decisions ‣ Shot List/ Shooting Order Tuesday, September 3, 13
  187. 187. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position ‣ Lens selection ‣ Lighting decisions ‣ Shot List/ Shooting Order ‣ Rigging Issues Tuesday, September 3, 13
  188. 188. What To Plan for Creatively ‣ Camera position ‣ Lens selection ‣ Lighting decisions ‣ Shot List/ Shooting Order ‣ Rigging Issues ‣ Alternative shooting options Tuesday, September 3, 13
  189. 189. Make a Plan Get your thoughts on a page Tuesday, September 3, 13
  190. 190. Making a Plan ‣ Site Survey ‣ Storyboard ‣ Sketch ‣ Camera ‣ Shot list ‣ Lighting diagrams Tuesday, September 3, 13
  191. 191. Photoshop for art Direction ‣ Shoot test shots in a raw format ‣ Organize with Adobe Bridge or Lightroom ‣ Open in Camera Raw ‣ Color grade to desired look ‣ Share with crew for lighting direction Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  197. 197. Crew IS PART OF THE EQUATION BETWEEN RESOURCES AND WHAT YOU WANT TO ACCOMPLISH Tuesday, September 3, 13
  198. 198. Gear and CREW How Much to Bring? Tuesday, September 3, 13
  199. 199. Crewing ‣ Can you do it all? ‣ Minimize delays in shooting ‣ Build multitalented crew ‣ Examine and adjust budget ‣ Add support crew if possible ‣ Audio ‣ Gaffer ‣ Data Technician ‣ Camera Assistant Tuesday, September 3, 13
  200. 200. Gear ‣ Story requirements ‣ Basics ‣ Specialty Items ‣ Jibs ‣ Sliders ‣ Lenses ‣ Power Requirements ‣ Storage ‣ Cards ‣ Drives Tuesday, September 3, 13
  201. 201. Gear ‣ Test your gear thoroughly ‣ Rehearse shots ‣ Test exposure ‣ Test lenses ‣ Work out the bugs (There are several) Tuesday, September 3, 13
  202. 202. A Gap in Knowledge is like a Hole In your Head Tuesday, September 3, 13
  203. 203. The POSTPRODUCTION WORKFLOW There are Extra Steps... But it’s Worth it Tuesday, September 3, 13
  204. 204. The WORKFLOW ‣ Transfer to Field Drive and Mirror ‣ Determine Editing Format ‣ Identify Storage Requirements ‣ Transfer to an Edit Drive ‣ Determine Transcoding Specs ‣ Organize Media ‣ Transcode Media (optional) ‣ Edit Tuesday, September 3, 13
  205. 205. Storage Requirements ‣ DSLR video footage has a low data rate ‣ Transcoded footage has significantly higher data rate ‣ Calculate for both camera original and transcoded footage ‣ Media storage should be redundant ‣ AJA’s Data rate calculator very useful for calculating storage requirements Tuesday, September 3, 13
  206. 206. PLAN FOR STORAGE ‣ Storage space is consumed relatively fast. ‣ Canon 5D Mark II ‣ 1920 X 1080 at 30 fps needs approximately 320 MB of card space for each minute of footage ‣ A 32 GB CF card will hold about 100 minutes of footage ‣ Often use bus-powered drives for field Tuesday, September 3, 13
  207. 207. Transfer to Drive ‣ Transfer to a reliable drive ‣ Ideally you'll use a RAIDed and redundant drive, right away. ‣ Make sure both transfers are complete before reformatting the cards. ‣ Transferring also helps validate the data integrity of files and can prevent issues later with a corrupt clip. Tuesday, September 3, 13
  208. 208. Public Service Announcement Case Study Tuesday, September 3, 13
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  241. 241. Resources Things to help get the job done Tuesday, September 3, 13
  242. 242. richardharringtonblog.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
  243. 243. http://kelbytraining.com/ Tuesday, September 3, 13
  244. 244. bit.ly/DSLRtips Tuesday, September 3, 13
  245. 245. photofocus.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
  246. 246. creativeclouduser.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
  247. 247. From Still to Motion ‣ A photographer’s guide to creating video with your DSLR ‣ Full color case study with hands-on activities ‣ 6+ hours of training videos ‣ www.peachpit.com/stilltomotion ‣ Free sample – tinyurl.com/fs2msample Tuesday, September 3, 13
  248. 248. Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots ‣ Designed for new users and solo shooters ‣ Maximize gear you own and grow on a tight budget ‣ Situation-based learning ‣ http://tinyurl.com/dslrvideobook ‣ Free sample posted Tuesday, September 3, 13
  249. 249. An Editor's Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro ‣ Designed for experienced editors ‣ Make the move from Final Cut Pro or Avid ‣ Professional workflow ‣ www.peachpit.com/premiereguide ‣ Over 6 hours of video ‣ Free sample posted Tuesday, September 3, 13
  250. 250. Richard Harrington twitter.com/ rhedpixel linkedin.com/in/ richardharrington facebook.com/ RichHarringtonStuff RichardHarrington Blog.com Tuesday, September 3, 13
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