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SPTechCon - Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Information Architect

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  • My dedication to you before I begin. By the end of this you will have gained 3 things. It might be new knowledge, it might be a new method but you MUST gain 3 things by the end. If you don’t my first challenge to you is to stalk me, hunt me down and make sure you get 3 things from me. Because I owe you 3 things! This is meant to help you. 
  • [ANIMATED]
  • [ANIMATED]
  • [ANIMATED]
  • Why are we here?We have a common goal: To implement a successful SharePoint Project
  • But… SharePoint is huge
  • And very complicated, with lots of moving parts
  • Even more complicated than SharePoint is people, and their moving parts  (i.e. the way they think, their allegiances, their perceived roles within the organization)
  • We’re trying to find the best solution
  • But to do that, we need to know to best define the problem
  • We are here to share some ideas
  • … and give you some tools
  • These are not magic bullets: You will still experience frustrations and difficulties along the way
  • But everything we’ll show you has worked for us and helped us to deliver successful projects in the past.
  • My goal for you: Ability to move forward confidently, knowing that you have increased your chances of delivering a solution that really works for your customers.
  • The techniques and tools we show you will help you communicate with your stakeholders in ways that keep you and them committed to the same goals and on the same page = prerequisites for success
  • Practical, proven advice that will guide you in your project
  • A little detour into F Laws
  • Russell Ackoff: “f-Laws are truths about organisations that we might wish to deny or ignore – simple and more reliable guides to everyday behaviour than the complex truths proposed by scientists, economists, sociologists, politicians and philosophers”Adapted for SharePoint by Paul Culmsee
  • An objective should not be filled with operationally meaningless superlatives such as biggest, best, optimum, and maximum; for example, one company says it wants to "maximize its growth potential," another "to provide products of the highest quality." How in the world can a company determine whether it has attained growth potential or highest quality?
  • Now lets get back on-track
  • Speak to Owen Allen (creator of this map) for details on this
  • Dominating the skyline of Arkhangelsk, a city in Russia's far north-west, it is believed to be the world's tallest wooden house, soaring 13 floors to reach 144ft - about half the size of the tower of Big Ben. The house that Sutyagin built is also crumbling, incomplete and under threat of demolition from city authorities determined to end the former convict's eccentric 15-year project. When Sutyagin began work on his dacha in 1992, he claims he was only intending to build a two-storey house - larger than those of his neighbours to reflect his position as the city's richest man, but certainly not a contender for the Guinness Book of Records. However, convinced by a trip to see wooden houses in Japan and Norway, he concluded that he had not used roof space efficiently enough and decided to keep building. "First I added three floors but then the house looked ungainly, like a mushroom," he said. "So I added another and it still didn't look right so I kept going. What you see today is a happy accident."There were other motives too. Having grown up in a Soviet communal flat, Sutyagin said he felt lonely living by himself.Not only would his house make a perfect love nest for his molls, it could also accommodate the 18 executives at his construction company.
  • This is to set the conceptual sceneYou will see this diagram a lot.
  • Requirements is NOT the right word to use here (but you have to because your clients and stakeholders expect it).(Sue Hanley first pointed this out to me.)
  • Because I said so, and I’m the customer.If you don’t include my requirement, I’ll shoot!One of my biggest jobs as a SharePoint BA is to manage this desire. My three rules of SharePoint: Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity
  • What if we say: We can do that for $10.Client says: Go for it!
  • What if we say: We can do that… for $1 Million.Client says: Wait a sec – maybe we can think of some alternatives(Hey! Maybe it’s no longer a ‘requirement’)
  • So, what happens when the customer says “I need this”This is the “we need it all” solution – often arrived at before defining the problem
  • SharePoint suffers from “The Hammer Problem”:When you have a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.And SharePoint is one giant mother of a hammer
  • So, what happens when the customer says “I need this”This is the “we need it all” solution – often arrived at before defining the problemThe “Hammer” problem
  • Think about alternatives:Is it close by?
  • How fast do I need to get there – who needs to come with me
  • Is a less flexible but more cost-effective solution already out there
  • Is the destination specialized and particularly hard to get to?
  • Maybe we need to really think outside the box
  • Simple is not ALWAYS the best solution: There are times when a complex and expensive solution is the only way to get the required destination
  • Bottom line: Arrive at outcomes, not requirements
  • The other problem with requirements is that you only have one time to mention them, so you want ALLLLL of them to be met.So, you put everything in that you can think of…SharePoint lets you be ‘agile’Start with the three rules: Simplicity/Simplicity/SimplicityIdeas from: PragPub Feb 2011 – Pragmatic ProgrammersWay of the Agile Warrior - by Jonathan Rasmusson
  • But the reality is that most requirements never get used as designed because the landscape changes under your feet.
  • And this causes you to change course, sometimes even before that ‘required’ item is even finished being built or tested.
  • Leading to a bunch of rusty tools lying around that cause trouble for years.e.g. what happens when you need to upgrade or migrate? Someone has to chip the rust off to see if this stuff is even useful anymore
  • The result is wasted money
  • So, shifting gears: I’ve explained what we should not be doing. What CAN we do?
  • What would you like SharePoint to do?Well, what can it do?Tons! Let me show youWhat do I need that for?Well, it depends… what do you want it for?Well, it LOOKS cool – sure: I want it.
  • Favorite phrase: If you don’t know where you’re going, any path will get you there.
  • But First: DO NOT DEMO SharePoint Confuses peopleSets unreasonable expectations
  • The focus here needs to be on pain points and outcomes: NOT RequirementsTry to stick to one team at a time3 – 8 people is ideal – up to 12-15 can work.Need to make sure you hear from everyoneDon’t let manager dominateMake SURE you get front-line workers, not just managersBook 1.5 hours – plan on an hour and a bit.People love some extra un-booked time at the end.
  • The following slides are a sample deck that I use in workshops
  • Most people hate the pie, but I like to use it to set scopeARM WRESTLE WITH RICHARD ON THIS ONE?
  • Now, it’s ok to build a demo: Use their language, colors, logoShow ‘day in the life’ type scenario
  • The requirements are gathered, documented and approved.The solution is developed and shared with the stakeholders.This isn’t what we meant!
  • Everyone knows…
  • It’s “Data about Data” as Einstein proved all those years ago
  • I won’t tell you yet but…It is an iterative process – you won’t understand it right away, but you will circle in towards understanding over time[ANIMATED]
  • Metadata is a new concept for manyUse of metaphors to explain the concepts
  • Metadata is a new concept for manyUse of metaphors to explain the concepts
  • Ok, so that was goofing around – now let’s get serious.
  • The music is the contentYou can know a lot of facts about the album:PrincePop/Rock1984You can know all the facts, but it doesn’t substitute for the content (the music)(Purple Rain example originally suggested by Yoav Lurie)
  • How do you sort CD’sArtist?Title?Year?Genre?Colour?You have to decide up-front – and stick to it –because the objects are physical
  • What if the store was full of unlabeled tin cans?You would need to open every can to see if had what you wanted(Tin can example originally suggested by Serge Tremblay)
  • Now we don’t need to open each can, but they are all in a jumble and you have to pick up each can to check if has what you want.
  • Items are grouped by area (canned fruit, canned sauce, canned vegetables)Signs point you to the correct area so that you can quickly find what you need.BUT: Because the objects are physical, you need to pick a method and stick to it
  • This uses the base metaphor that we live with every day.The concept of a “file” and a “file folder” as a way of storing digital data is a metaphor taken from the world of paper managementIt has become so ingrained, that we think of it as natural, but it’s not: It was invented in 1983 by Apple (wikipedia)
  • All your files are stored in one folder and their names are completely meaninglessThis is like the unlabeled cans: You have to open each file to see what it contains
  • You have a bit of a better situationThe naming convention lets you find the file you need (but there’s no way to sort by year)Rely on users to follow the naming convention (religiously)
  • A ha!Now we’re in great shape. We’re like the supermarketStructured and LabelledBUT...
  • ... then, you hire a summer internWho doesn’t know the folder hierarchy and makes up their own
  • Findability is challengingPutability is the real problemThis is Bill English’s word for knowing where to save a documentWhat if we could make putability easier while also improving findability?This is the promise of metadata
  • Data about dataYes, but not enough info Seth Maislin of Earley & Assoc. says it's the "Is-ness" of something:This 'is' a contract. That 'is' a pop album.For us it enables findability, policy and processFindability for locating the right documentsPolicy – records managementProcess – Status of a business process (e.g. Not started, In process, Complete, Approved, Archived)
  • So, let’s create an alternative structure that is logically equivalent, but that makes putability much easier while preserving findabilityBy the way: One way to start to figure out an organization’s metadata is to look at the folder names.You will probably not want to simply copy this, but it can be a good guide/starting point
  • It’s not this… (visual joke)[ANIMATED]
  • It’s not this… (visual joke)[ANIMATED]
  • It’s this…Not really this, but let’s use these creatures to understand.
  • Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of binomial nomenclature. He is known as the father of modern taxonomy
  • This works because it’s really about governance – this is a stable structure that can’t be changed by just anybody:Changing this structure requires a world-wide meeting of the top scientists in the field, usually involving name-calling and fist-fights (or so I’ve heard)[ANIMATED]
  • Did you catch the subtle change here.The taxonomy is now of your ‘X’ drive.
  • And this is a common result
  • Problem here is lack of governance – anyone can add any folder anywhere anytimeThis boils down to the ‘putability’ problem – I’ll search for a long time to find a doc, but not for long to see where to put it.[ANIMATED]
  • Once you’ve migrated your x drive to SharePoint, and all the promised benefits fail to emerge, The reaction is: (next slide)
  • Never, ever, use folders!Except when it makes sense to do so.[ANIMATED]
  • [ANIMATED]
  • Back on track
  • I’m not Carl, but let’s talk about why this works.After all, it’s the same as a directory treeThe difference is governance
  • Is this too many to ask for?Do we force users to answer all these questions/enter all this data?
  • Instead of confusing people with the SharePoint interface, I use a familiar tool: ExcelUsing some simple macros, I am able to illustrate the power of filters and views.There’s no free lunch however: People now have to enter metadata.We can simplify this by defaulting values like “Date” to today and “Year” to current year.We can leverage content types as well
  • Think of them as different forms with slots to fill in.Two documents may have overlapping slots (or, metadata).It may make sense to store these two types of docs in the same library (HR Requests), but use content types to drive workflow, policy and prompt users only for the metadata that applies.[ANIMATED]
  • Think of them as different forms with slots to fill in.Two documents may have overlapping slots (or, metadata).It may make sense to store these two types of docs in the same library (HR Requests), but use content types to drive workflow, policy and prompt users only for the metadata that applies.[ANIMATED]
  • [ANIMATED]
  • To achieve success, you need shared commitmentTo get that, you need to get to shared understandingSing from the same song-book: Get onto the same page
  • What is this a picture of?With a lot of experience, training or imagination, you may figure something out – but the concept is ABSTRACT
  • This is something that people understand and agree on.It is concreteVisual tools can help make the abstract into the concrete
  • MindManager (from MindJet) is a tool that has changed the way I work. Here is a quick demo of how it works.
  • Now lets get back on-track
  • A little detour into Card Sorting
  • A technique to get input orfeedback from usersYou may have great ideas of how to organize you intranet, but you users may have different ideasDonna Spencer says: “Card sorting is a great, reliable, inexpensive method for finding patterns in how users would expect to find content or functionality.”
  • The analysis can be useful, but it is the process of watching people do the sorts that helps provide the real value
  • Now lets get back on-track
  • Using Mind Maps for navigational design makes this process MUCH faster and more efficient.
  • First, I do a presentation about what metadata is to a collection of groupsGive them homeworkThen, bring them back to build taxonomy: This needs to be done with just one group at a time
  • Note: Picture of ‘tacks’ is a visual joke – it doesn’t mean anything
  • Using mind-mapping tools to build the taxonomy from the homeworkI use MindJet MindManager – and I like and highly recommend it.There are other tools that are less expensive.
  • What is wireframing?Creating page mockups that show the function and structure of the page without the fonts/colors/images, etc
  • This tool called ‘Balsamiq’ makes it extremely simple and fast to make wireframes.They look cartoonish, but that makes it easy to focus on what’s important (not color, font, etc.)
  • Even without building an automated workflow, it’s essential to understand the business process of your customers.Use BizAgi (which is free to download) or Visio 2010 to map these processes.
  • If you are lucky, you can take the results of these workshops and activities and create a roadmap for a phased, rational approach to SharePoint deployment. Push HARD to do this step.Summarize workshop resultsBuild Gap AnalysisIdentify dependenciesLay out a timeline (not a project plan at this point)
  • The OutcomeUsing a mixture of education, communication, and visualization we can significantly mitigate the risk of ‘This isn’t what we wanted!’What to watch out for…It seems easier to avoid taking the time to use many of these techniques. Always keep in mind that there is never only one version of a solution.
  • To Impose Specific Storage QuotasWith SharePoint Site Collections you can define specific storage quotas and email warnings to notify users when they are approaching a defined threshold on their site collection storage.To Impose Specific Sandbox QuotasWith a SharePoint Site Collection you can define the maximum number of points sandbox solutions can use per day. Additionally you can also configure an email warning when storage exceeds a certain number of points.
  • For Search SeparationFor Workflow Separation
  • So Your Site Collection Does Not Have The Same Active (or Inactive) Site Collection FeaturesThere are many times when this comes in handy. In SharePoint 2010 there are quite a few Site Collection level features you may not want active on specific site collections.Site collection features that are not active on other site collections (for example, the Publishing Infrastructure feature)
  • For Search SeparationFor Workflow SeparationSo Your Site Collection Does Not Have The Same Active (or Inactive) Site Collection FeaturesThere are many times when this comes in handy. In SharePoint 2010 there are quite a few Site Collection level features you may not want active on specific site collections.Site collection features that are not active on other site collections (for example, the Publishing Infrastructure feature)To Have a Separate Help Library to Store Custom Help
  • Disadvantages of Using Site CollectionsAll out-of-the-box Web Parts understand and work well within the boundaries of a Site Collection. None of them, including the significantly used Content Query Web Part, will cross Site Collection boundaries. Thus, the aggregation of information across Site Collection boundaries is not possible using out-of-the-box Web Parts.You need to consider this when determining how you will split your information across Site Collections. Any situation that requires you to aggregate and display information across Site Collection boundaries will require a custom development effort or the purchase of a 3rd party Web Part.Your branding and content publishing customization efforts will also have to be duplicated. Currently, all master pages, page layouts, and CSS files, common publishing images and reusable content is bound to a Site Collection.
  • For Security Management Benefits:Every site collection creates a security boundary between one collection of sites and another collection of sites. Each site collection has its own collection of SharePoint groups and ACL references.You cannot see a complete list of Users who have permissions to the site or ObjectUsers are members of more than one AD GroupWork backwards to figure out permissions2010 – 1000 objects in an ACL, 5000 Objects per SharePoint GroupThe more ACLs you have, the more ACLs you have to manageKnow the Software Boundaries and Capacity limits http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspxFor Privacy or Management Benefits and Different Site Collection AdministratorsEach site collection has a role of “Site Collection Administrator” and a person or more assigned to that role. There are times when either for privacy/confidentiality reasons you cannot have a specific site collection administrator with the rights to see that sites content, or where you have different people that should be assigned to manage that collection of sites. The second is an extremely common scenario in large enterprise organizations where there is a need to distribute the technical ownership of site collection administration.
  • The Controlled IntranetIf your goals are to create an environment that nurtures the sharing of knowledge and intellectual property (IP), there are two critical success factors that must be adhered to.We must make the addition of knowledge in the solution as simple as possible. This is accomplished by:Thoroughly understanding how our Information Workers perform their daily job duties.Craft a solution that simplifies these duties by automating operational business processes.Implement your Intranet in such a manner as to ease where this knowledge is stored.Provide a solution that makes locating information quick and simple so our Information Workers can make better, informed business decisions. We accomplish this by:Providing topical, functional and task-based site structures that aggregate knowledge in a manner making it easy to locate based on a need.Architect knowledge in such a manner as to provide “very” relevant search results.The only way for you to successfully deliver a solution that adheres to these two critical success factors is to architect your corporate knowledge (information) in a manner that lends itself to aggregation and search. And, the only way to do that is through a detailed and carefully thought-out taxonomy. Simply tossing information into lists and libraries will only result in yet another repository that is similar to a file share. For an organization to successfully implement a controlled environment that improves operational efficiencies requires governance. The term governance itself implies rules, policies and best practices for the flow of information through an organization.Collab areas:It is also in the collaboration environments that you will find the greatest number of sites. Make sure you set the appropriate expectations (communicate, communicate, and communicate):Information in these sites is less structured; which means you will typically see less relevant search results.This area can quickly grow to thousands of sites. Don’t let 5,000, 10,000 or even 30,000 sites scare you; simply make sure you have the appropriate infrastructure to support it.Govern the amount of information that can be stored on each site; configure quotas.Govern the length of time a site may remain inactive. Provide a means of archival.Do Collaboration Sites Ever Become Controlled?Absolutely! You may find that a team creates a secure collaboration environment to start a community of practice. Over time, information may become key to driving success in the organization. In such a situation, the team may ask to convert the site to a more structured environment so its content is available to everyone in the organization.There are many ways of accomplishing this task. The easiest is to leave the site intact, and move it through your internal architecture/design processes. These processes will force some level of structure, including taxonomy; which will make the information available for aggregation and search (even constrained search). You can then update your search configuration to include its content in a manner that best suits your organizational information needs. Another approach would be to provide a controlled means of moving the site and content to the Controlled Intranet Site Collection.
  • more than 1000 security scopes (broken inheritance) leads to performance degradation. 50k scopes per list/doc lib is a limit or - more than 50k unique permissions per list is a hard limit.The Practical Limit? 2000 users/groups given access5k users/ad groups per sharepoint groupWhen you add a user or group to a unique ‘scope’ (broken permissions) it actually adds that user or group with ‘limited access’ to each scope in the hierarchy above the item…Best practice: Rely on group membership instead of indivudal user membership in the scopes. For example, if a single group can be used in place of 1,000 users, the scope will be 999 membership entries smaller for the scope and any of its parent scopes which will be updated with Limited Access rights for that single group instead of all 1,000 individual users with Limited Access rights. This additionally helps increase the speed of Limited Access rights push and ACL recalculation at the parent scope objects.Deep hierarchies also impact performance considerably. So try and avoid very deep hierarchies with unique permissions.
  • Note: We do not recommend that you use SharePoint groups to assign permissions to sites, because when a SharePoint group is used to assign permissions, a full crawl of the index occurs. Instead, we recommend Domain groups to be used.
  • We recommend that you use FGP for only those business cases for which it is required. FGP can be expensive in terms of both operational oversight and performance. If you must use fine-grained permissions, consider the following recommended practices: Ensure that you do not have too many items at the same level of hierarchy in the document libraries, because the time necessary to process items in the views increases.
  • You can avoid the use of FGP by doing the following: Break permission inheritance as infrequently as possible. Use groups based on directory membership to assign permissions.Assign permissions at the highest possible level. As part of this strategy, consider the following techniques:Use different document publish levels to control access. Before a document is published, the advanced permissions and versioning settings can be set for users who can only approve items in the document library. For non-document libraries (lists), use the ReadSecurity and WriteSecurity permission levels. When a list is created, the owners can set the Item-level permissions to either Read access or Create and Edit access.
  • Basically manage permissions by each SharePoint site uniquely (instead of at a fine grained level). So use the 3 built in groups or AD groups etc and set permissions at the web level. From another point of view, if you have a large list where you want to uniquely set permissions try having ‘more than one list’ in multiple webs to get around some of the performance impact involved (2k unique permissions per web as an example). It avoids a lot of the hierarchy performance hits we discussed.Of course even better is using multiple site collections, but for now we will keep it simple and say at a minimum an effective way would be doing it at the web level (or even list/library level before getting to the item level).
  • Use event handlers to control edit permission. You can have an event handler that registers an event using the SPEventReceiverType.ItemUpdating and SPEventReceiverType.ItemUpdated methods, and then use code to control whether the update should be allowed. This is extremely powerful, because you can make security decision based on any metadata of a list or item, without affecting the view rendering performance.Use AddToCurrentScopeOnly method to assign Limited Access membership within a SharePoint group. The key element in this principle is to redesign the architecture so that scope membership does not cause ACL recalculation at the parent document library and Web.This is mainly applicable if the cause of the excessive number of unique scopes was through an automated process such as an event handler or workflow that dynamically modified object permissions. The recommendation in this case is to make a code change to whatever process was creating the unique security scopes.
  • Your group needs to see summary information about the list items or different views of the same set of items. For example, a manager may want to see the progress on all technical issues for an organization or see all the issues that were filed within the same time period. People want to browse or search for the issues in the same location on a site. You want to apply the same settings to the list items, such as tracking versions or requiring approval. The groups working on the list share similar characteristics, such as the same levels of permission. Unique permission can be applied to specific list items, but if the levels of permission vary greatly, consider multiple lists. You want to analyze information about the list or receive consolidated updates for the list. You can receive alerts when the list items are changed or see the changes to a list by using RSS technology. RSS feeds enable members of your workgroup to see a consolidated list of information that has changed.
  • You don't expect people to need summaries of the items together. The groups of people working with the information are distinct and have different permission levels. You need to apply different settings, such as versioning or approval, to multiple sets of items. You do not need to analyze the items together or receive consolidated updates about the list.
  • Your group needs to see summary information about, or different views of, the same set of files. For example, a manager may want to see all files grouped by department or by due date. People want to search for the files in the same location on a site. You want to apply the same settings to files, such as tracking versions of files or requiring approval. The groups that are working with the library share similar characteristics, such as the same levels of permission. You want to analyze information about the files in a spreadsheet, or to receive consolidated updates about the files.
  • The types of files that you want to store and manage are distinct, and you don't expect people to frequently view summaries of the files or to search the files together. The groups of people who are using the files are distinct and have distinctly different permission levels. You need to apply different settings, such as versioning or approval, to different sets of files. You do not need to analyze the files together or receive consolidated updates about the files. You want to provide different sets of options for creating new files, or you want the options on the New menu of a library to appear in a different order.
  • You can set the default content type of a library – and set that content type’s default values so that any item added to that library will automatically have metadata associated with it.
  • Use if you have clear organizing requirementsDeploy a good Search Architecture  Search Based NavigationDon’t forget to turn on the Content Organizer Feature – on the Target Site too!Don’t forget to implement Content Types in the Target LibrariesTeach the users!
  • Never, ever, use folders!Except when it makes sense to do so.[ANIMATED]
  • Ease of use for users: File Open/Save – reduce metadata load
  • Managed Metadata ServicesTerm StoreHierarchical collection of termsMultilingualSynonymsLimitMaximumvalueLimittypeNotesMaximum number of levels of nested terms in a term store7SupportedTerms in a term set can be represented hierarchically.  A term set can have up to seven levels of terms (a parent term, and six levels of nesting below it.)Maximum number of term sets in a term store1000SupportedYou can have up to 1000 term sets in a term store.Maximum number of terms in a term set30,000Supported30,000 is the maximum number of terms in a term set.Note:Additional labels for the same term, such as synonyms and translations, do not count as separate terms.Total number of items in a term store1,000,000SupportedAn item is either a term or a term set. The sum of the number of terms and term sets cannot exceed 1,000,000. Additional labels for the same term, such as synonyms and translations, do not count as separate terms.Note:You cannot have both the maximum number of term sets and the maximum number of terms simultaneously in a term store.
  • Webpage (instead of just a folder name and possible metadata)
  • Synchronization of metadata The ability to synchronize metadata allows users to change metadata on multiple items at once within a collection of content. Frequently users will want to do a bulk change of metadata stored within a folder. The most common way to achieve this using Folders is by utilizing the Datasheet View for document libraries, which allows users to bulk change properties quickly. However, this can be error prone and has limitations, such as the inability to change Managed Metadata fields. In contrast, Document Sets allow the ability to configure a column as a Shared Column. Shared Columns then share metadata across the entire Document Set. By changing the column value at the document set, all content contained within the Document Set will be updated with the new value without the user manually having to change each individual document. Another advantage is that all columns types are supported, so users can also easily change Managed Metadata columns for all content as well.
  • Running workflows on multiple items with SharePoint Designer Running workflows on multiple items is another commonly asked for requirement in many organizations. The ability to send multiple items through an approval process is something that commonly appears on a list of requirements when organizations are implementing SharePoint. With folders there is really no other option than to manually start an Approval process on each item. Unfortunately even though you can now select multiple items to perform actions on within Lists and Libraries, you cannot do this with workflows. If you have ten documents that you need to send through an Approval process, then it's a rather laborious process. Of course you can create custom workflows in .NET code to solve this issue and it's a good example of where the new Site Workflow type may be used. However, if we are limiting ourselves to out-of-the-box or SharePoint Designer declarative workflows then we are out of luck. With Document Sets we have new Workflow Actions available in SharePoint Designer 2010. This means that we can indeed send an entire Document Set through an Approval Process. Since a Document Set includes multiple documents, we are in effect sending multiple items through an approval process
  • Provisioning of default content The ability to create a template and have this reused when a user is creating a document is commonly used in SharePoint. The power of Content Types within the platform can be harnessed very effectively to create these templates and deploy them across multiple sites. However, often we don't require just a single document to be created, but rather a collection of documents to be provisioned. For example consider a project submission pack or a RFP Response that consists of multiple documents. In an ideal world, a user would be able to create collections of documents quickly and easily. If using the folder approach, you can only create single documents, one at a time. So if a user wanted to create a project submission pack then they would create the folder that would house these documents, and then create each individual Content Type one at a time. This is obviously a cumbersome approach. In contrast Document Sets allow us to provision default content when the Document Set is created. So if we create a RFP Response Document Set we can choose to have default content created when a user creates the Document Set:
  • Folders can have folders under them etc. Doc sets cant.
  • The focus here needs to be on pain points and outcomes: NOT RequirementsTry to stick to one team at a time3 – 8 people is ideal – up to 12-15 can work.Need to make sure you hear from everyoneDon’t let manager dominateMake SURE you get front-line workers, not just managersBook 1.5 hours – plan on an hour and a bit.People love some extra un-booked time at the end.
  • This is to set the conceptual sceneYou will see this diagram a lot.
  • First, I do a presentation about what metadata is to a collection of groupsGive them homeworkThen, bring them back to build taxonomy: This needs to be done with just one group at a time
  • Using mind-mapping tools to build the taxonomy from the homeworkI use MindJet MindManager – and I like and highly recommend it.There are other tools that are less expensive.
  • Even without building an automated workflow, it’s essential to understand the business process of your customers.Use BizAgi (which is free to download) or Visio 2010 to map these processes.
  • What is wireframing?Creating page mockups that show the function and structure of the page without the fonts/colors/images, etc
  • This tool called ‘Balsamiq’ makes it extremely simple and fast to make wireframes.They look cartoonish, but that makes it easy to focus on what’s important (not color, font, etc.)
  • This tool called ‘Balsamiq’ makes it extremely simple and fast to make wireframes.They look cartoonish, but that makes it easy to focus on what’s important (not color, font, etc.)
  • The first tip I will give is to never ever give a single number. As an example when asked how long it will take to make ‘report A’ let the requester know a range that you feel comfortable with. Why a range? Realistically in a quick situation like that if you don’t give a range it won’t indicate how uncertain you are about the estimate.If you were thinking about the request and felt like the task would take somewhere between 2-8 hours then communicating only a single value guess such as ’6 hours’ can be misleading as it doesn’t include any information about how confident you are.
  • So the first thing we need to agree on is that quickly estimating a ‘single number’ (without math/careful consideration) typically leads to poor results in both setting the right expectation and being accurate.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • Now onto the difficulties of even coming up with a range of possibilities. One of the hardest parts of estimating is coming up with a range you feel really confident in.Basically when you give an estimate you should give a range that you feel 90% confident that the real value will fall within that range (90% is the suggested optimal confidence level due to the effort involved in getting more than 90%).You don’t have to be perfect but you have to feel willing to bet on it.In other words if you consider giving a range of 2-8 hours on a task as an estimate you should confirm that you are actually 90% confident that the total time will fall between that range. There is a trick (one of many) that Douglas mentions in his book that is easy to remember and use for testing whether you are actually close to 90% confident about an estimate.Imagine that you win $2000 in one of two ways:A) You will win $2000 if the true time it takes turns out to be between the upper and lower bounds you provided. If not then you win nothing.B) You draw a M&M at random from a bag of 9 red M&M’s and 1 blue M&M. If the M&M is red you win $2000. If it is blue you win nothing.Which option would you take? If you choose B) (which statistically most people do) then it means you might not be 90% confident but actually less confident (say 80%, 60% etc). If you choose A) it’s also not really what we want because it means you are probably over confident (especially if you felt strongly geared toward A). So you adjust the bounds (upper and lower) until you find a place where you feel indifferent between option A) and B) – that is ‘probably’ your 90% confidence level for this estimate.It’s not as complicated (or in some ways as effective) as many other methods you can use to calibrate how confident you are about your estimates but it works and is easy to remember and start implementing immediately.
  • So the first thing we need to agree on is that quickly estimating a ‘single number’ (without math/careful consideration) typically leads to poor results in both setting the right expectation and being accurate.
  • A lot of this can seem daunting and I know one of the hardest things is figuring out how to do some of the things I have shown today. If you are interested in further training or assistance please let me know. Based on the number of people who are interested and the areas of interest we can schedule further training sessions to help everyone better use the SharePoint portal.It's our commitment to you that we will continue to hear your feedback and identify the issues. I encourage you to give us feedback during the coming months, and we will continue to deliver more and more functionality, more and more guidance to help you be successful with your application of SharePoint.Thank You for Reading/Listening

SPTechCon - Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Information ArchitectSPTechCon - Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint Information Architect Presentation Transcript

  • Practical Tools and Techniques for the SharePoint InformationArchitect
    Facilitated By: Richard Harbridge and RuvenGotz
    #SPTechCon @rharbridge @ruveng
  • Who am I?
    I
  • Richard Harbridge
    @RHarbridge
    Rharbridge.com
    Rharbridge@Allin.com
  • Toronto
    Ruven Gotz
    @ruveng
    spinsiders.com/ruveng
    ruveng@navantis.com
  • Ruven Gotz
    @ruveng
    spinsiders.com/ruveng
    ruveng@navantis.com
  • The Goal isSuccess
  • SharePoint is
    huge
  • With many
    Moving parts
  • The people stuff
    is complex
  • How do we buildthe best solution?
  • How do we
    define the
    problem?
  • We are here to
    share some ideas
  • … and give you
    some tools
  • Still not easy
  • Proven success
  • Take Away: Confidence
  • Take Away: Improved Communication
    SPTechCon
    The SharePoint Technology Conference
    17
  • Take Away: Knowledge YouCan Use
    SPTechCon
    The SharePoint Technology Conference
    18
  • Our Goal Today…
    From Here To Here
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • What We Won’t Cover (In Depth) Today:
    Records Management (and Information Policies)
    Search Architecture and Considerations
    Planning For Multiple Languages
    Column Decisions (Choice Column vs Managed Metadata Column vs Lookup Column etc…)
    Audience Targeting
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • What is SharePoint?
  • What is SharePoint?
    Why does your organization use SharePoint?
    Step 1: Please Fill Out The Fields…
    Step 2: Give This Sheet To Someone Close By
    Step 3: We Will Collect Your Responses
  • Meet Joe
    Hi!
  • At Joe’s Company…
  • Decision Makers don’t have Enough Information
  • The CFO needs to Reduce Costs
  • IT Services Struggles to Keep Up
  • And
    People Are Having Trouble Finding What They Need
  • So Joe has an Idea!
  • Since…
    Awesome!
    Not as awesome.
  • And Everyone in Joe’s Company uses Microsoft Office…
  • SharePoint is the Perfect Fit!
  • What is SharePoint?
  • What is SharePoint
    to IT Services?
  • SharePoint and IT
    The Main Point of Implementing SharePoint:
    • SharePoint eventually allows Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use technology without IT’s direct involvement.
    Enable
    Solutions
  • SharePoint and IT
    Secondary (But Important) Points:
    • SharePoint’s integration with technologies you already use and it’s extendibility are invaluable.
    When I Say “SharePoint Integration” You Probably Think Of This...
  • SharePoint and IT
    The Reality:
    • IT struggles with supporting another technology.
  • IT Information Overload
    Information
    Information
    Information
    Information
  • IT Platform Benefits
  • What is SharePoint
    to the Business?
  • SharePoint f-Laws
    f-Law 1: The more comprehensive the definition of governance is, the less it will be understood by all
    f-Law 2: There is no point in asking users who don’t know what they want, to say what they want
    f-Law 3: The probability of project success is inversely proportional to the time taken to come up with a measurable KPI
    f-Law 4: Most stated governance objectives are platitudes – they say nothing but hide behind words
    f-Law 5: Confidence is the feeling that you have until you understand the problem
    http://www.cleverworkarounds.com/vid/Paul%20keynote/Player.html (1 hour talk)
  • f-Law 4: Most stated governance objectives are platitudes – they say nothing but hide behind words - If you cannot reasonably disagree with an objective, or measure it, then it is a platitude
    Platitudes:
    • “Collaboration will be encouraged”
    • “A best-practice collaboration platform”
    • “To provide the best collaborative experience for our users”
    Non-platitudes:
    • “We are proving that we can grow the organisation while reducing email volumes and centralising document storage”
    • “By building communities of practice, we prove that we can reduce information overload and allow our users to find the right expertise”
  • Back On Track
  • What is SharePoint
    to the Business?
  • Prioritize and Plan
  • Ensure Clear Priorities
  • Map Solutions to Objectives
     Direct Relationship Indirect Relationship
    * Objectives/solutions should be more specific – Example purposes only.
  • SharePoint Solutions (Evolution)
    *Super Simplified
  • Map the needs of the organization to the right technology…
  • Perform in depth product comparisons and evaluations
  • Like this
    one…
    Excerpt of Product Comparison written by Richard Harbridge courtesy of Concept Interactive
  • SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet…
    SharePoint is not a Silver Bullet at NothingButSharePoint.com
  • SharePoint will be…
    • Utilized by Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use technology without IT’s direct involvement.
    • Our primary unified application delivery platform.
    • Our primary workflow/business process automation platform.
    • Our intranet and communication center for internal corporate communications.
    SharePoint will not be…
    • Our (external) web content management platform.
    • Our primary document management platform.
    • Our contact management platform.
  • 2007
    Online
    On Site
    SharePoint has Multiple Options
    2010
  • It’s Big Ecosystem
  • It’s not just a feature to feature comparison
  • So Joe does all that good research and…
  • SharePoint is a part of his overall Enterprise Technology Plan
  • The Outcome
    Within an overall enterprise technology plan SharePoint and it’s solutions meet specific business needs.
  • What to watch out for…
    “Technology provides no benefits of its own; it is the application of technology to business opportunities that produces ROI.” – Robert McDowell
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Why Do I Need Effective Governance?
  • There are big risks that are almost always realized when you don’t have it!
  • SharePoint Sprawl
    He was only intending to build a two-storyhouse - larger than those of his neighbors to reflect his position as the city's richest man.
    “First I added three floors but then the house looked ungainly, like a mushroom," he said. "So I added another and it still didn't look right so I kept going…”
    Risk: Un-Managed Sites and Content were not periodically reviewed for accuracy and relevance.
  • Quality Deterioration
    Risk: Did not ensure that content quality is maintained for the life of the portal.
  • Frustration Failure
    Risk: Did not consistently provide a high quality user experience.
  • Priority Paralysis
    Risk: Did not establish clear decision making authority/ownership and escalation procedures so that conflicts and/or policy violations are resolved in a timely manner.
  • Ineffective Use of Time/Resources
    Risk: Did not ensure that the portal strategy is aligned with business objectives so that it continuously delivers business value.
  • It’s not just about insuring against or mitigating those risks!
  • What does that mean?
    Without effective governanceorganization, performance, andcapability are significantly reduced.
  • Without Governance
  • Executing Governance
  • With Governance
  • The Outcome
    You can now communicate why Governance is important/required.
  • What to watch out for…
    It’s not insurance. It makes your SharePoint investments more successful.
  • Building The Governance Teams
  • How do we start?
  • RecommendedGovernance Teams
    There are typically 5 teams for SharePoint Governance:
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • Alternative Teams
    If the organization or implementation is small enough you might only need to start with two and break them apart as you mature/grow.
    • Tactical Team
    • Operations
    • Development
    • Support
    • Strategy Team
    • Business
    • Technical
  • The Strategy Teams
  • Governance Teams
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • Business Strategy Team
    Role: Provide strategic insight, direction and prioritization for the portal.
    Decentralized
    Business
    Centralized
    IT
  • Define,Prioritize and Plan
  • Ensure Clear Priorities
  • Governance Teams
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • Solution (Technical)Strategy Team
    Role: Provide technical insight, direction and prioritization for the portal.
    Tip: If a business direction requires new integration or effort with other technologies then a technical representative for that technology will be necessary.
  • Map Solutions to Objectives
     Direct Relationship Indirect Relationship
    * Objectives should be more specific – Example purposes only.
  • SharePoint will be…
    • Utilized by Business Users to develop and implement business solutions that use technology without IT’s direct involvement.
    • Our primary unified application delivery platform.
    • Our primary workflow/business process automation platform.
    • Our intranet and communication center for internal corporate communications.
    SharePoint will not be…
    • Our (external) web content management platform.
    • Our primary document management platform.
    • Our contact management platform.
  • Strategic Responsibilities
    • Defining Clear Objectives and Priorities
    • High Level Solutions Definition and Ownership
    • High Level Platform Classification
    • Communication Planning and Management
    • Resource/Capability Management
    • Expectation Management
  • Define a Governance Pyramid
  • Information Architecture and Governance Areas
    Permanent central portal
    - Few authors/Many readers
    Communication Portal
    • Central navigation
    • Central taxonomy
    • Divisional stakeholders
    • Enterprise search
    CentralPortal
    Departmental portlets
    • Departments
    • Resources
    • Business Processes
    - Few authors/Many readers
    Increasing Strictness of Governance
    Collaboration
    • Local taxonomies
    • Local search
    Semi Structured
    Team sites
    - Multiple authors
    Blogs, bios,
    Social
    Personal
    Above The Line versus Below The Line
  • The Tactical Teams
  • Governance Teams
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • The Tactical Operations Team
    Role: Provide operational (IT- related) support and maintenance for the system infrastructure
    They manage the more routine maintenance of the system by performing nightly backups, performance monitoring and analysis, and keeping the environment current with security releases and upgrades.
  • Operations Responsibilities
    • Objectives/Priorities
    • Disaster Recovery Plan
    • Storage and Quota Policies
    • Monitoring Plans
    • Maintenance Plans
    • Service Level Agreements
    • Security Policies
    • Deployment Process, Policies, and Schedule
  • Governance Teams
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • The Tactical Development Team
    Role: Customize/configure, personalize, and leverageSharePointto achieve business objectives.
    This team is a loosely-knit community who's membership ranges from highly skilled programmers to technically savvy end users in charge of personalizing departmental team sites.
  • Development Responsibilities
    • Objectives/Priorities
    • Branding Guide
    • SharePoint Designer Policy
    • Workflow Policy
    • Development Standards (Including OOTB vs Custom)
    • Development Environment Policy
    • Testing Requirements
    • Deployment Process, Policies, and Schedule
    SharePoint Standards Online
  • Deployment Process/Policies
    Extremely Important! Ensure you have clear schedules and ownership.
  • Governance Teams
    • Business Strategy Team
    • Solutions/Technical Strategy Team
    • Tactical Teams:
    • Tactical Operations Team
    • Tactical Development Team
    • Tactical Support Team
  • The Tactical Support Team
    Role: Provide support of the SharePoint applications and platform.
    Creates and manages a support system with effective training and proper channels of question or issue escalation and resolution. This team should also include influential users and leaders.
  • Support Responsibilities
    • Objectives/Priorities
    • Site Classification and Platform Classification
    • Site Provisioning Process/Questionnaire
    • User Expectations Agreement
    • Roles and Responsibilities
    • Support Agreement(s)
    • Training and Communication Plans
    • MySite Policies (Pictures)…
  • Support Responsibilities
    • User Lifecycle Policy
    • Taxonomy Management
    • Social Policies
    • Content Standards
    • Legal and Compliance Policy
    • Search Management
    SharePoint Standards Online
  • Multiple Tiers for Escalation
    (You can’t know everything)
  • Measure Support
    Learn and use data to be proactive.
  • Diversify Support
    resources/mediums
    • Books and Manuals
    • Online
    • MSDN
    • TechNet
    • Blogs
    • Cheat Sheets
    • One on One
    • Classroom Training
    • Forums
    • Help
    • Etc
  • Sample Support Flow
    Consultants, MS and Vendors
    Consultative Support
  • IS
    Use them.
  • Productivity Hub
  • Governance Tip
    If possible have one member in all of the Governance teams or some members across multiple teams!
  • The Outcome
    Everyone Achieves a Shared Understanding of SharePoint Related Processes.
  • What to watch out for…
    Not just documents, policies, and procedures. It is an active and ongoing process.
  • Governance Resources
  • IS
    Use them.
  • Governance Checklist
  • TechNet, Community and More..
  • Frameworks
    are
    Use them.
  • No Single “Approach”
    Projects
    Communities
    Tasks
    Practices
  • ITIL Framework
  • COBIT Framework
  • SharePoint Deployment and Governance using COBIT 4.1
    Chennault & Strain
    http://www.amazon.com/SharePoint-Deployment-Governance-Using-COBIT/dp/1604201177
  • Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF)
  • SharePoint Maturity Model
    Sadalit van Buren
    http://sharepointmaturity.com
  • The Outcome
    There is a ton of material out there to support you.
  • What to watch out for…
    External best practices, policies, standards, and ideas may or may not be the right fit.
  • Steps to Effective Governance…
    Understand The Need For Governance
    Build Your Governance Teams
    Understand How SharePoint Is/Should Be Used
    Develop/Practice Guidance and Policies
    Return to Step 2 and Repeat Steps 2 through 4
    You Have Perfect Governance
    You Can Never Truly Achieve Perfect Governance. So long as you are performing the steps you are achieving Effective Governance.
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Requirements Definition and Mapping
  • What makes something a requirement?
  • We can do that for $10
  • We can do that for $1 Million
  • We require a jumbo solution to get to our destination
  • We require a jumbo solution to get to our destination
  • Sometimes, you do need this
  • It’s the destination that matters: The outcome
  • Kitchen sink projects
  • Your project will change over time
  • Unexpected things happen
  • More than half of “required” features never get used
  • Result of a kitchen sink project
  • Shift gears
  • SharePoint chicken & egg problem
  • DON’T demo SharePoint
  • Initial discovery workshop
  • SharePoint Workshop
  • Agenda
    About the Project , Our Team & Goals
    SharePoint Overview
    Department and Role
    Document Collaboration
    Document Storage and Search
    Compliance, Records Management & Off-line
    Questions
  • About the Project, Our Team & Goals
    About this Project
    Determine the requirements and scope for a SharePoint implementation at ABC Corp.
    Our Team
    Alison Andrews – Project Manager
    Bob Baker – Technical Architect
    Carol Conrad – SharePoint Analyst
    Don Drummond – Infrastructure Analyst
    Workshop Goals
    Set expectations
    Gather your input
    Keep it to an hour (+ optional half-hour for further questions)
  • SharePoint 2007 Overview
    Documents/tasks/calendars, blogs, wikis, e-mail integration, project management “lite,” Outlook integration, offline documents/lists
    Virtual Teams/Global Teams
    Server-based Microsoft Office Excel® spreadsheets and data visualization, Report Center, business intelligence Web Parts, KPIs/Dashboards
    BusinessIntelligence
    Collaboration
    Platform Services
    Workspaces, Mgmt,Security, Storage,Topology, Site Model
    BusinessProcess andForms
    Enterprise Portal template, Site Directory, My Sites, social networking, privacy control
    OOB workflows, WF integration, rich and Web forms–based front-ends, LOB actions, pluggable SSO
    Portal
    EnterpriseContentManagement
    Search
    Integrated document management, records management, and Web content management with policies and workflow
    Enterprise scalability, contextual relevance, rich search for people and business data
  • SharePoint 2010 Overview
    Ribbon UI
    SharePoint Workspace
    SharePoint Mobile
    Office Client and Office Web App Integration
    Standards Support
    Intranet, Extranet, Team Collaboration
    Business Connectivity Services
    InfoPath Form Services
    External Lists
    Workflow
    SharePoint Designer
    Visual Studio
    API Enhancements
    REST/ATOM/RSS
    Building complex solutions on top of SharePoint
    Sites
    Tagging, Tag Cloud, Ratings
    Social Bookmarking
    Blogs and Wikis
    My Sites
    Activity Feeds
    Profiles and Expertise
    Org Browser
    Communities
    Composites
    PerformancePoint Services
    Excel Services
    Chart Web Part
    Visio Services
    Web Analytics
    SQL Server Integration
    PowerPivot
    Business Intelligence
    Content
    Insights
    Enterprise Content Types
    Metadata and Navigation
    Document Sets
    Multi-stage Disposition
    Audio and Video Content Types
    Remote Blob Storage
    List Enhancements
    Organizing Information
    Search
    Social Relevance
    Phonetic Search
    Navigation
    FAST Integration
    Enhanced Pipeline
    Search
  • Department and Role
    Please introduce yourself:
    Name
    Department
    What is your role within your department?
    How do you interact with technology to do your job?
    How does the current technology help you (or hinder you) from doing your job?
  • Document Collaboration
    Do you work on documents with others?
    How do you collaborate (e-mail, shared drive) ?
    What document types do you create?
    Which programs do you use?
    Do your documents require multiple reviews and edits? Is approval required?
    How do you implement the required workflow?
    How do you get the final information out to the audience that needs it?
    Do you publish PDF’s?
    How are they distributed/posted?
  • Document Storage and Search
    Can you find the documents that you need, when you need them?
    Does your shared drive folder hierarchy work well?
    How long does it take to find a document? At what point do you give up?
    When you create a document, do you know where it should be saved?
    Are documents saved in more than one location to ease retrieval?
    Does search work well?
    What features would you like to see in search that would make it better for you and your team.
  • Compliance, Records Management & Off-line
    Do you have any regulatory requirements that you need to meet?
    ISO 9000
    Sarbanes-Oxley – Bill 198
    How are records management policies implemented?
    Are there specific policies for document retention and destruction.
    Do you have a need for off-line access?
    Do you travel off-site for your work
    Do you need to work when you are disconnected from the network.
  • Questions
  • OK to demo SharePoint
  • The Outcome
    Using workshops, facilitation and by engaging the business you will define, prioritize, and phase SharePoint requirements.
  • What to watch out for…
    Without clear requirements, prioritization and the right expectations being set SharePoint projects won’t scale well.
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Understanding Metadata
    (and how to explain it to others)
  • What is Metadata?
    The BIG Question
  • Data about data
  • What is Metadata?
    The BIG Question
    What is Metadata?
    I think I get it
    I think I get it
    Oh! Now I see(Mostly)
  • What’s a Meta for?
    What’s a
    Meta for?
  • Let’s use a
    Metaphor
  • What does a cow say?
  • What does a chicken say?
  • What does a duck say?
  • The sounds these animals make are attributes that distinguish them
    • Prince
    • Pop/Rock
    • 1984
    Example from Yoav Lurie
  • Image from Aaron Landry/Flickr
  • Adapted from the “pea soup” story by Serge Tremblay
  • What is our Base Metaphorfor files?
  • What if we saw this?
  • Better…
  • Solve with folders
  • Hire an intern
  • What is metadata?
  • This is metadata!
  • What is Taxonomy?
    or this…
    Not this!
  • What is Taxonomy?
    or this…
    Not this!
  • Carl Linnaeus (1751)
  • Taxonomy
  • Taxonomy
    Superclass
  • Taxonomy
    Class
  • Taxonomy
    Order
  • Taxonomy
    Suborder
  • Taxonomy
    Family
  • Taxonomy
    Subfamily
  • Taxonomy
    Genus
  • Taxonomy
    Species
  • Shared Drive Zoo
    Taxonomy
  • As we’ve already seen: This always works out great
  • Shared Drive Zoo
  • Moving this mess to SharePoint
    makes it worse
  • SharePoint Sux
  • The #1 rule of SharePoint?
    Except when it makes sense
    Never use folders
    ever
  • A Brief Detour
  • Folders for Security
    Permissions assigned per folder
  • Folders in SP2010 – They’re back!
    • Combine metadata and folders
    • Best of both worlds
  • A SharePoint Taxonomy (Navigation)
  • A SharePoint Taxonomy (Metadata)
  • Adding Metadata (when uploading)
  • A SharePoint Simulation
  • What is metadata?
  • What is Taxonomy?
  • What are content types?
  • Vacation Request
    Drug Reimbursement
    Name _________
    Emp. # _________
    Date _________
    Dates Requested:
    From __________
    To: __________
    Manager ________
    Approved Y/N
    Name _________
    Emp. # _________
    Date _________
    Drug Used:
    Name __________
    Cost: $ _________
    Manager ________
    Approved Y/N
  • Vacation Request
    Drug Reimbursement
    Name _________
    Emp. # _________
    Date _________
    Dates Requested:
    From __________
    To: __________
    Manager ________
    Approved Y/N
    Name _________
    Emp. # _________
    Date _________
    Drug Used:
    Name __________
    Cost: $ _________
    Manager ________
    Approved Y/N
  • Both Content Types in One Library
  • Security
    Content Types for:
    Workflow,
    Policy,
  • The Outcome
    Shared Understanding of Metadata’s Importance and Usage to Improve ‘Findability’ and Information Utility.
  • What to watch out for…
    People Must Understand The Value Of Metadata, Or They Will Reject The Idea.
  • Practical Applications of Mind Mapping
  • Same Page
  • Abstract
  • Concrete
  • Mind Mapping Demonstration
  • IBIS mapping demonstration
    http://www.cognexus.org/
  • Back on track
  • What is Card Sorting?
  • “Card sorting is a great, reliable, inexpensive method for finding patterns in how users would expect to find content or functionality.”
    -Donna Spencer
    http://www.amazon.com/Card-Sorting-ebook/dp/B004VFUOL0
  • What are the types of card sort?
    Open
    & Closed
  • Open card sorting process
    Snake
    Ferrari
    Cat
    Ford
    Dog
    Gerbil
    Honda
    Rolls Royce
    Mouse
  • Results
    Pets
    Cars
    Cat
    Ferrari
    Dog
    Honda
    Mouse
    Rolls Royce
    Gerbil
    Ford
    Snake
  • But not always what you expect
    Cute
    European
    Scary
    Domestic
    Ford
    Cat
    Ferrari
    Mouse
    Rolls Royce
    Dog
    Snake
    Gerbil
    Japanese
    Honda
  • But not always what you expect
    Animals
    Luxury
    Regular
    Ferrari
    Cat
    Ford
    Rolls Royce
    Honda
    Dog
    Gerbil
    Mouse
    Snake
  • Analysis
    http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/analyzing_card_sort_results_with_a_spreadsheet_template
  • Back On Track
  • Navigation
    workshops
  • Navigational Map
  • Document inventory workshops
  • The Inventory Worksheet
  • Build the Taxonomy
  • Build Mind Map (based on inventory worksheet)
  • The Outcome
    Using visual tools provides shared understanding, which is a crucial driver of shared commitment to a goal.
  • What to watch out for…
    Workshops become much more interactive; hone your meeting facilitation skills to retain control and obtain value
  • Wireframing, andProcess Mapping
  • Wireframing Workshops
  • Balsamiq
  • CommonIntranet Components
  • Balsamiq DEMO
  • Wireframing Tip!
  • Don’t Forget Consistency
    Consistency Across User Environments
    Modify Provisioned Site (or Templates) Based on Need
    Each Page Design Should Be Consistent
  • Business Process Workshops
  • Visio 2010 Demo
  • Common Intranet Processes
    • Absence Reporting and Vacation Scheduling
    • Expense Reimbursement
    • Equipment and Room Reservation and Management
    • Meeting Planning and Management
    • Policy Review and Approval
    • Booking Travel
    • Interview Management and Hiring Processes
    • Training Sign Up and Management
    • Event Planning
    • Change Request Management
    • Timecard/Time Tracking
    • Product Planning
    • Help Desk Ticket Management
    • Compliance Support
    • Contacts Management
    • Inventory Tracking
    • Lending Tracking
    • Sales Lead Pipeline
  • Roadmap
  • Time Challengesin SharePoint Projects
  • What is the best approach to use when working with SharePoint?
  • ITERATIVE APPROACH
  • Why Iterative?
    • SharePoint is a very large platform.
    • It takes time to understand SharePoint.
    • SharePoint is great for rapid prototyping, and for proof of concept work.
    • It ensures there is enough time to review, adjust, and communicate.
  • Opportunistic driven learning
    Image from Paul Culmsee
  • Opportunistic driven learning
    Image from Paul Culmsee
  • Visualizing Timelines
    An easy way to createsharedunderstanding of the impactestimates make on projects.
  • Visualizing Existing Timelines
    A great way to take existing project timelines and set stakeholder expectations or communicate impact of changes.
  • The Outcome
    Using an Iterative Approach keep learning impact in mind, use Visio Timelines to foster shared understanding and commitment.
  • What to watch out for…
    Expectation is the timeline killer. If everyone has the same expectations then the timeline is never ‘off’.
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Making
    Information Architecture Decisions
  • The Importance of Making Good Information Architecture Decisions
  • SharePoint Containment Hierarchy
    What we care about from an information architecture perspective.
  • SharePoint Containment Hierarchy
  • Site Collection or Site (Subsite)?
    OR
  • Site Collection
  • Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
  • When To Use A Site Collection
    Site Collection 1
    Site Collection 2
    Webparts & Aggregation
    Webparts & Aggregation
    Masterpages & Page Layouts
    Masterpages & Page Layouts
    Navigation
    Navigation
    Search Across Site Collection Boundaries
  • When To Use A Site Collection
    Site Collection 1
    Site Collection 2
    Group Y
    Group A
    Group Z
    Group B
    Collection Admin Y
    Group C
    Collection Admin A
    Collection Admin Z
    Collection Admin B
  • Recommended Approach
    Bob Mixon on SharePoint 2007 Site Collections
  • SharePoint Permissions
  • AD Groups or SharePoint Groups?
    OR
  • SharePoint Groups vsAD Groups
  • Item Level Permissions
    Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper
  • “Item Level” Permissions
    Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper
  • Web Level Permissions
    Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper
  • Targeted Code
    New in SharePoint 2010 SPRoleAssignmentCollection.AddToCurrentScopeOnly
    Best Practices For Using Fine-Grained Permissions Whitepaper
  • Purpose of a List?
    • To Replace Excel Spreadsheets
    • To Track Complex Input From Multiple People
    • To Centralize Storage and Retrieval of Content
    • To Provide Validation, Easy To Use Online Forms
    • To Reduce Duplication of Effort
  • One List or Multiple Lists?
    OR
  • When To Use a Single List
    • You want to simplify viewing the same set of items. (When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists).
    • You want to search for items in the same location.(When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to configure search scopes).
    • You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings.
    • You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of items (alerts or RSS).
  • When To Use Multiple Lists
    • You don’t expect people to need summaries of the items together.(When dispersed across many lists it requires additional effort to aggregate the lists).
    • You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings.
    • You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings.
    • You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).
  • Advanced Uses Of Lists
  • One Library or Multiple Libraries?
    OR
  • When To Use a Single Library
    • You want to simplify viewing the same set of documents. (When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries).
    • You want to search for documents in the same location.(When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to configure search scopes).
    • You want to easily apply consistent versioning, approval, metadata or form settings.
    • You want to receive consolidated updates on the collection of documents (alerts or RSS).
  • When To Use Multiple Libraries
    • You don’t expect people to need summaries of the documents together.(When dispersed across many libraries it requires additional effort to aggregate the libraries).
    • You need to apply different versioning, approval, metadata, or form settings.
    • You want to distribute management of versioning, metadata, workflows or form settings.
    • You do not need to receive consolidated updates (alerts or RSS).
  • List and Content Type Tip!
  • Default Content Types and Metadata Values
  • Navigating with MetadataTip!
  • Navigating with Metadata, not Folders
  • Set up with Library Settings
  • Configure Setttings
  • Filters the list
  • Document Routing Tip!
  • Content Organizer and Routing
  • Configure the router
  • Configure settings
  • Create Rules
  • Create/Modify Rules
  • Use the Drop-off Library
  • Add a document
  • Enter Metadata
  • Detour: 2010 Metadata
  • Back to Drop-off library
  • Your document was moved
  • Rules don’t apply…
  • … it doesn’t get moved
  • Folder or Metadata?
    OR
  • The #1 rule of SharePoint?
    Except when it makes sense
    Never use folders
    ever
  • What’s wrong with folders?
    Deep structures hard to navigate
    Finding stuff is hard
    Figuring out where to put stuff is even harder
    Stuck with a rigid structure
    Search is not the silver bullet
  • What’s the alternative?
    metadata
  • What’s the alternative?
  • Metadata = No more folders
    Filtering
    Views
  • Really? No more folders? Ever?
    What situations would you use folders?
    Subdivide large libraries/lists
    Security/Permissions This is a favourite of mine
    Ease of use for users
    Really? No more folders?
    Really?
  • Downsides of Metadata
    No free lunch (there is pain here)
    Awful architectural choices to make
    Multiple site collections
    Good Practice
    Bad for Metadata
    Maintenance headache
    Can be mitigated
    Define at top level if possible
  • Folders for easy permissions
    Create folder
    Set permissions
    Create view without folders
    Easy for users (they only see what they are supposed to)
  • Folders and Default Values
  • The Sales document library
  • Drill down into Military folder
  • Drill down into Air-to-Ground
  • Add a new document here
  • Note: Some metadata prefilled
  • How did we do that?
    Library tab
    Library settings
  • Column default value settings
  • Select a folder and set defaults
    Note folder inheritance
  • Set the default value
  • in SharePoint 2010
    Managed Metadata Service
    Share Metadata across site collections
    Multilingual Metadata (big gotcha )
    Hierarchical Metadata
    Navigate via Metadata (already discussed)
    Keywords/Folksonomy (Out of scope today)
    Folders can assign default metadata (already discussed)
    metadata
  • Working With Managed Metadata
  • Term Store Management
  • Adding Terms
  • Turn off “Available for Tagging”
    Add sub elements: Proposal, Quote, Invoice
    Leave “Available for Tagging checked”
  • Term Store Manager
    Painful & Slow
    Needs a better way
    I created a ‘toy’ to try out some ideas
    http://bit.ly/ruveng-mmts
    Article links to other solutions (Excel)
  • CSV file for Import to Term Store
  • To Sum Up…
    SharePoint 2007
    Folders BAAAAD!
    Never use them
    Except when the situation warrants
    SharePoint 2010
    Folders GOOOOD!
    Never use them
    Except when the situation warrants
  • Folder or Document Set?
    OR
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders and Default Values
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document Sets vs Folders
  • Folders vs. Document Sets
    Document
    Document
    Document
    Folder
    Document Library
    Folder
    Folder
    Document
    Folder
    Document
    Document Set
    Folder
    Document
    Document Set
    Document
  • The Outcome
    You need to understand all of the SharePoint objects, their limitations, and their benefits to make effective decisions.
  • What to watch out for…
    There is always a trade off and all information architecture decisions should be constantly re-evaluated.
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Putting it all Together
    (a case study approach)
  • Introducing multiMEGA Industries
    The world’s leading supplier of Missiles, Produce and Soap
  • They Want A SharePoint Intranet!
  • Find and Involve Stakeholders
  • Educate Stakeholders
    Enable
    Solutions
  • Define and Prioritize Objectives
  • Initial Discovery Workshop
  • MapSolutions to Objectives
     Direct Relationship Indirect Relationship
    * Objectives/solutions should be more specific – Example purposes only.
  • Roadmap
  • Information Architecture and Governance Areas
    Permanent central portal
    - Few authors/Many readers
    Communication Portal
    • Central navigation
    • Central taxonomy
    • Divisional stakeholders
    • Enterprise search
    CentralPortal
    Departmental portlets
    • Departments
    • Resources
    • Business Processes
    - Few authors/Many readers
    Increasing Strictness of Governance
    Collaboration
    • Local taxonomies
    • Local search
    Semi Structured
    Team sites
    - Multiple authors
    Blogs, bios,
    Social
    Personal
    Above The Line versus Below The Line
  • Navigation
    Workshops
  • Document Inventory Workshops
  • Build Mind Map (based on inventory worksheet)
  • Common Intranet Processes
    • Absence Reporting and Vacation Scheduling
    • Expense Reimbursement
    • Equipment and Room Reservation and Management
    • Meeting Planning and Management
    • Policy Review and Approval
    • Booking Travel
    • Interview Management and Hiring Processes
    • Training Sign Up and Management
    • Event Planning
    • Change Request Management
    • Timecard/Time Tracking
    • Product Planning
    • Help Desk Ticket Management
    • Compliance Support
    • Contacts Management
    • Inventory Tracking
    • Lending Tracking
    • Sales Lead Pipeline
  • Business Process Workshops
  • Structured Approach for Navigation
    Original Concept – 5 Steps to Structure SharePoint Sites
  • Wireframing Workshops
  • CommonIntranet Components
  • Identify Key Pages
  • Mockup Key Pages
  • Setup Your Governance Teams
  • Implement the steps
    • Find the stakeholders
    • Establish steering committee
    • Determine the goals of the project (no platitudes!)
    • “Requirements” Gathering Workshops
    • Roadmap and Timelines
    • Defining personas (who is our audience or audiences)
    • Card sorts
    • Navigation workshops
    • Wireframing workshops
    • Business process workshops
    • Document and Taxonomy workshops
    Governance
  • The Outcome
    A well planned information architecture approach will lead to better results.
  • What to watch out for…
    Iterative improvements are necessary and should leverage a model like the one we just walked through.
  • Practical SharePoint IA Review…
    Platform For Solutions That Achieve Business Objectives
    Effective Teams, Patterns, And Practices Are Critical
    Requirements Need To Be Carefully Considered
    SharedUnderstanding And SharedCommitment Are Key
    Every Decision Is More Effective With More Information
    Practice And Experience Really Help
    There Is So Much Out There You Can Use To Help
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • What We Will Cover Today:
    What Is SharePoint?
    Understanding SharePoint Governance
    Requirements Definition and Mapping
    Visualizing and Communicating SharePoint Concepts
    Making Information Architecture Decisions
    Case Study Approach (Implementing SharePoint IA)
    Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Information Architecture Tips and Tricks
  • Make it easier to work with
  • Make it easier to work with
    Powerful Columns You Probably Didn’t Know About
  • Make it easier to work with
    Why Leveraging SharePoint Blog Features for News is a Great Idea
  • IBIS Dialog Mapping
  • Setting Up A Governance Site
  • Why a Governance Site?
    It’s a lot of content.
    It’s a collaborative process.
    It’s an ongoing process.
    Each piece of content should have a clear owner.
    Content will need tobe shared.
  • Governance Announcements
  • SharePoint Solutions Listing
    In addition you can also create a ‘Roadmap’ or basically a Gantt Chart or visual indicator of solutions to show what you have achieved and where you are going with SharePoint.
  • Team Rosters and Definitions
  • Policies, Standards and Guidelines
    Use Search, Metadata, and Approval Workflows to help improve management and user experience.
    For living documents/standards that require many authors try a Wiki!
    SharePoint Standards Online
  • FAQs and a Glossary
    SharePoint Glossary Online
  • Patterns and Practices
  • TeamResources and Minutes
  • Feedback and Surveys
    Embed feedback options throughout the sites!
    Don’t forget to share stories!
  • Self Help and Support Resources
  • Complete Site Listing
    Include things like:
    • The owner and secondaryowner of the site.
    • The purpose of the site.
    • The URL, Size, and Usage Level of the site.
    • The last time the site was engaged by the support team.
  • The Outcome
    Using the SharePoint Platform we can effectively manage SharePoint Governance.
  • What to watch out for…
    Just having the Governance site isn’t enough. Content must remain fresh.
  • Giving Estimates
    At least 2 hours… 4 hours maybe?
    Forgotten/Not Shared Now That We Have Our Magic Number
    16? Way too much. 8 Tops.
    I better pick something in between…
    6 Hours!
    How Long Will X Take You?
    Never Give a Single Number
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Always Give Ranged Estimates
    2-8 Hours!
    Ranged Estimates Help Communicate Confidence and Set Expectations
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Are You Confident In That Range?
    2-8
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Are You Confident In That Range?
    Actual Result
    OR
    Within Range
    OVERCONFIDENT
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Are You Confident In That Range?
    Actual Result
    OR
    Within Range
    LESS CONFIDENT
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Are You Confident In That Range?
    Actual Result
    OR
    Within Range
    90% Confident
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • Give 90% Confident Ranged Estimates
    Within Range
    =
    2-8 Hours!
    Two Simple Tricks For Making Better Estimates
  • The Outcome
    There are many ways that we can improve usability of SharePoint and as a result improve our Information Architecture.
  • What to watch out for…
    Tips and Tricks are not enough to ensure successful Information Architecture.
  • Full Name
    Email Address
    Allow Us To Keep In Touch And Send You SharePoint Information Architecture Resources
    Role(s)
    IT Pro Developer End User Architect Biz Analyst
    Helps us understand where yourexperience with SharePoint has been and what roles were contained in our workshop audience.
    Would you recommend this workshop to a colleague or friend?
  • What did you likebest or what did you find useful?
    What was missing or what would you have liked to see?
  • Thank You Organizers, Sponsors andYoufor Making this Possible.
    Questions? Ideas? Feedback? Contact us:
    • Twitter: @ruveng & @rharbridge
    • Blogs: spinsiders.com/ruveng & rharbridge.com
    • Email us: ruveng@navantis.com & richard@rharbridge.com
    • Resources: http://www.PracticalIntranet.com