Design Matters
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  • IT folks often live in the first two circles, function and viabbility.
  • Not just the hand out, it ’s the whole lesson.
  • Not just the hand out, it ’s the whole lesson.
  • Every teacher has an opportunity to improve their students ’ absorption of material, Math teachers for instance. When I was tutoring beginning algebra to middle school students, I could not find a hand out that simplified things visually. Every text book I found, and all my Internet searches helped me to understand, but the students I tutored needed something more visual.
  • Here is what I cam e up with. In this example the lesson is not only divided into easy to digest sections it is also numbered, helping students to feel confident about the ease of learning the process.
  • Most people have heard of this company, but not everyone knows the story about how their logo came about. When the company ’s brand consultants first designing the logo, they carefully selected a font that had clean, simple lines. A font that suggested a contemporary, serious business. Not childish, or ornate, not old-fashioned or foreign. Then they chose a color that connotes, “business.” In next refinement they convinced the company to shorten their corporate name and logo from "Federal Express" to the popular abbreviation "Fed Ex". Besides creating a much stronger, shorter brand name, they reduced the amount of color used on planes and trucks and saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in paint costs. The “ Ex ” was accentuated with another color, carefully selected by extracting some of the blue from the deep purple of the “ Fed ” and then beefing up the remaining orangey red. Finally, a typographer took great pains to give each letter a relationship to the letters around it by thickening, and kerning each letter individually. In the process of kerning, the designer found a place for an arrow in the negative space between the E and the x. An arrow had been originally proposed as an underline, but dismissed by the team as a distraction from the text. By incorporating the arrow into the negative space, it no longer detracted from the company name, rather, it served as a subliminal indication of forward motion.
  • This is a handout that one of my colleagues shared with me. It is a really great write up on how to write a good paragraph. “I hand this out,” he said, “and some of the students will follow along as I review the points. I ask them to save this and refer to it when they write.” “ As they turn in their papers, and I am reviewing the work, I will often pull this out, and point out the points that have been missed--typically, they are in the last half of this paper.” What would make a student find an instruction sheet like this more digestible…more memorable? As educators, I think most of us are familiar with the term “chunking…” how about if, along with making the body of this more visually pleasing, we also did some visual chunking?
  • In this version, the title has been split into two easily identifiable terms. Fonts and colors have been assigned according to importance: the darkest color and boldest font four the main point, and the italics, softer color for the term. A blue screen is used to create the four chunks, tying the title into the visual, and chunking the information for the student. Large white numbers are added to make these chunks easily identifiable, and to convey the idea that there are only really four big things to think about, not a whole page-full. Check boxes add the last helpful part, it is an invitation to keep track as you go, to check things off. Analogous colors are selected for the whole document, so that no “one thing” is calling attention away from the page as a whole. This document was designed in Microsoft Word.
  • • Analogous colors are called that because they have a relationship with the colors next to them. Each one is a very important part of the color next to it, half of it, in fact. • We can learn a lot from nature, where analogous colors are often found. Using two, three or four analogous colors is almost always a safe bet. • Cool colors are the blues and greens, • warm colors the reds and yellows, • but you can also select colors that move from warm to cool, like this last selection that goes from red to purple.
  • Spot color is very effective in drawing attention to one word.
  • In this large page of text, it ’s pretty easy to find the word that I have chosen to give importance to.
  • If I highlight another word, that word, too, becomes important. What will happen if I continue to pick important words, and highlight them?
  • Eventually, the highlighting works against itself.
  • Even when they ’re paying for four colors, rather than choosing to use color everywhere, savvy marketers use the color so that it is powerful, and has greater impact
  • But it is better to set some limits, or nothing will be emphasized! I have encountered a number of clients who give me a list of things to put on their ad, catalog page, or handout. The story is always the same. “I want the company name to stand out most. Oh, and the item on sale, too that’s really important. Oh, and the phone number, that should REALLY stand out. Oh yeah, and the hours, that’s CRITICAL. Oh, plus the web address, and the price, and the phone number, and, well, as you can see, a strategy must be developed.
  • But it is better to set some limits, or nothing will be emphasized! I have encountered a number of clients who give me a list of things to put on their ad, catalog page, or handout. The story is always the same. “I want the company name to stand out most. Oh, and the item on sale, too that’s really important. Oh, and the phone number, that should REALLY stand out. Oh yeah, and the hours, that’s CRITICAL. Oh, plus the web address, and the price, and the phone number, and, well, as you can see, a strategy must be developed.
  • But it is better to set some limits, or nothing will be emphasized! I have encountered a number of clients who give me a list of things to put on their ad, catalog page, or handout. The story is always the same. “I want the company name to stand out most. Oh, and the item on sale, too that’s really important. Oh, and the phone number, that should REALLY stand out. Oh yeah, and the hours, that’s CRITICAL. Oh, plus the web address, and the price, and the phone number, and, well, as you can see, a strategy must be developed.
  • But it is better to set some limits, or nothing will be emphasized! I have encountered a number of clients who give me a list of things to put on their ad, catalog page, or handout. The story is always the same. “I want the company name to stand out most. Oh, and the item on sale, too that’s really important. Oh, and the phone number, that should REALLY stand out. Oh yeah, and the hours, that’s CRITICAL. Oh, plus the web address, and the price, and the phone number, and, well, as you can see, a strategy must be developed.
  • But it is better to set some limits, or nothing will be emphasized! I have encountered a number of clients who give me a list of things to put on their ad, catalog page, or handout. The story is always the same. “I want the company name to stand out most. Oh, and the item on sale, too that’s really important. Oh, and the phone number, that should REALLY stand out. Oh yeah, and the hours, that’s CRITICAL. Oh, plus the web address, and the price, and the phone number, and, well, as you can see, a strategy must be developed.
  • Let ’s see, I’ve got a Headline and four sentences of Instructions What more does this need? A graphic element. If you don ’t have the time or inclination to look for a picture, make part of the text become the graphic element.
  • By choosing to make the headline on the side, and putting it in a reverse block, a graphic element has been added, and a lot of emphasis has been put on the priority number one item, the headline.
  • Help me to decide the best way to lay out this ad.
  • By utilizing visual chunking and creating large numbers, there is indication that this thing can be accomplished easily, in four steps.
  • And now, by adding colors that work well together, the slide has a cohesive look.
  • Help me to decide the best way to lay out this ad.

Transcript

  • 1. Have you noticed lately howmuch Design matters?
  • 2. Why?
  • 3. “I thought design was just about making it pretty”
  • 4. Turns out, No.Design makes sense
  • 5. What was the first MP3 playerin the US Market?
  • 6. So why do most of us have…
  • 7. Why didn’t the Rio win? • It had a better battery life • More storage • Could play more formats • It beat the iPod by 2 years • It was more functional, and viable...but not desirable.
  • 8. The result of Apple’s focuson product design? Apple is no longer “Apple Computer” #1 music retailer in the world surpassing Walmart stores They control approximately 80% of the MP3 player market They’ve Sold 5 billion units
  • 9. Why?Desirable Design
  • 10. So if I’m desirable, I’m allset?Not exactly, there are otherconsiderations…Design is a process thatbalances three things…
  • 11. Does it serve a purpose? Functional Is it usable? Is it what the Viable Desirable viewers (users) want? Will they respond?Are there resources to make it work? (Time and Money?)How much can you put into it?
  • 12. The top two Google hits for“Solving equations”
  • 13. A better designcommunicatesa visual path• utilizes “visual chunking”• illustrates the process• shows examples Functional, Viable, Desirable Time=1 hour Money= b & w photocopies
  • 14. The Federal Express logo was redesigned by Lindon Leader in 1994 when he was aSenior Design Director at Landor Associates,San Fransisco. Known as Federal Express in 1971, he remarketed the brand as FedEx. His team went through the design process that follows, what do you think theie reasoning was at each step?
  • 15. FederalExpress
  • 16. FedEx
  • 17. FedE x
  • 18. 4-Point Checklist for the paragraph Single Focus: A paragraph should develop one main idea. The main idea usually called a topic sentence, isembedded within the paragraph. This idea is developed with supporting detail. The focus on the main topic iscompleted in a final conclusion sentence (of a one paragraph composition) or linked (as a transition) to anothertopic sentence in the next paragraph(s). Does the paragraph hold to a single, main idea? If a new main point is introduced in the paragraph, is it used as a transition to the topic in the followingparagraph?Topic Sentence: The topic sentence states the main point or idea of a paragraph and is often, but not always, thefirst sentence in the paragraph. Does your first (or topic) sentence state the main point or idea of the paragraph?Is this sentence clear, either as a statement or a question? Does the sentence tell or suggest to the reader what information or ideas might likely be found or included inthe paragraph? Supporting Detail: Supporting details are the ideas and information that develop the main point of the topicsentence. Have you written several sentences that adequately explain or increase understanding of the main point of thetopic sentence? When appropriate, do you use examples, illustrations, explanations or facts as support?Is all the information relevant to the main point of the topic sentence? Organization: Although several ideas may be related within a paragraph, they should not be included in ahaphazard or jumbled manner. Is the paragraph coherent, with a definite sense of planning or flow?Are the relationships between and among ideas clear and logical?
  • 19. Visual ChunkingBreak the informationinto manageable partsAnalogous ColorsCreate a sense of unity
  • 20. Analogous Colors
  • 21. What about the creative use of spot color?
  • 22. Large blocks of text look gray from a distance. That’sbecause our eyes mix the black letters and the whitespaces together. This is the same theory that thepointillists and impressionists worked by, where oureyes perform as mixers of color. The human eye hasamazing capacity when it comes to color mixing,which is why we aren’t distracted by the dots innewspaper photographs. In magazines our eyesblend cyan, magenta, yellow and black. Adding justone word, in one color really makes the word standout, doesn’t it? That’s because everything else isanother color, so that word is the one different item.What if you were to add another word in the samecolor, or a different one? Would you then have twowords that stand out? Would this strategy continue tobe effective, adding more and more items that “standout?” No, it wouldn’t. Eventually, it would simply bea mix of colors.
  • 23. Large blocks of text look gray from a distance. That’sbecause our eyes mix the black letters and the whitespaces together. This is the same theory that thepointillists and impressionists worked by, where oureyes perform as mixers of color. The human eye hasamazing capacity when it comes to color mixing,which is why we aren’t distracted by the dots innewspaper photographs. In magazines our eyesblend cyan, magenta, yellow and black. Adding justone word, in one color really makes the word standout, doesn’t it? That’s because everything else isanother color, so that word is the one different item.What if you were to add another word in the samecolor, or a different one? Would you then have twowords that stand out? Would this strategy continue tobe effective, adding more and more items that “standout?” No, it wouldn’t. Eventually, it would simply bea mix of colors.
  • 24. Large blocks of text look gray from a distance. That’sbecause our eyes mix the black letters and the whitespaces together. This is the same theory that thepointillists and impressionists worked by, where oureyes perform as mixers of color. The human eye hasamazing capacity when it comes to color mixing,which is why we aren’t distracted by the dots innewspaper photographs. In magazines our eyesblend cyan, magenta, yellow and black. Adding justone word, in one color really makes the word standout, doesn’t it? That’s because everything else isanother color, so that word is the one different item.What if you were to add another word in the samecolor, or a different one? Would you then have twowords that stand out? Would this strategy continue tobe effective, adding more and more items that “standout?” No, it wouldn’t. Eventually, it would simply bea mix of colors.
  • 25. There are many other ways to emphasize aword, or a phrase.
  • 26. There are many other ways to emphasize aword, or a phrase.
  • 27. There are many other ways to emphasize aword, or a phrase.
  • 28. There are many other ways to emphasize aword, or a phrase.
  • 29. There are many other WAYS to emphasize aword, or a phrase.But doing too many things at once negates the effort
  • 30. Here are a few steps to make good design fall into place easily Familiarize yourself with all of the information that will be on your piece. Organize the information into a few different categories such as title, instructions, and illustrations. “Chunk the long blocks of text by breaking it up into manageable parts. Then, and most importantly, prioritize each category giving top priority to the category that needs the best visibility, and adding graphic elements to help viewers navigate the other items.
  • 31. Here are Familiarize yourself with all of the information that will be on your piece.a fewsteps to Organize the information into three or four different categories such as title, instructions, and illustrationsmakegood “Chunk the long blocks of text by breaking it up into manageable partsdesignfall into Prioritize each category giving top priority to the category that needs the best visibility, and addingplace graphic elements to help viewers navigate the other items.easily
  • 32. Rachel’s RoomComputer AssistanceServing the Community Since 1988345 Ocean House RoadCape Elizabeth, Maine 04107207-799-3309rguthrie@maine rr.comMonday-Friday 8am-4pm, Saturday and Sunday9am-3pmSale!Saturday & Sunday OnlyAll Flash DrivesBuy one get one free
  • 33. 1Here are Familiarize yourself with all of the informationa few that will be on your piece.steps tomakegood 2 Organize the information into three or four different categories such as title, instructions, and illustrationsdesignfall into 3 “Chunk the long blocks of text by breaking it up into manageable parts 4place Prioritize each category giving a number 1 to the category that needs the best visibility, and 4 for theEasily least.
  • 34. Here are 1 Familiarize yourself with all of the information that will be ona few one page of your piece. 2steps to Organize the information into three or four different categories such asmake title, instructions, and illustrationsgood 3 Chunk the long blocks of text; break itdesign up into manageable parts like bulleted or numbered lists, or paragraphsfall into 4 Prioritize each category giving aplace number 1 to the category that needseasily the best visibility, and 4 for the least.
  • 35. Rachel’s RoomComputer AssistanceServing the Community Since 1988345 Ocean House RoadCape Elizabeth, Maine 04107207-799-3309rguthrie@maine rr.comMonday-Friday 8am-4pm, Saturday and Sunday9am-3pmSale!Saturday & Sunday OnlyAll Flash DrivesBuy one get one free
  • 36. Typography RULES Font Point Size Leading Line Length Alignment
  • 37. Design MATTERSIn every aspect of our daily lives…
  • 38. Push the envelope • Be original • Think outside the box • • • • • • • • •