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Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
Australian history for dummies   workshop
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Australian history for dummies workshop

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  • 1. Australian History for DummiesWorkshop presented at the CSA Conference, Citipointe CentreBrisbane, Queensland, Australia13 July 2010<br />Presenter: Mr. Richard Leo MA(Hist), BA, Dip. Ed.<br />Head of Humanities, Nambour Christian College<br />Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History, Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 2. Introduction<br />Why ‘Australian’ History? Isn’t it supposed to be boring?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 3. Introduction<br />Draw Australia<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 4. Introduction<br />Draw Australia <br />Many of you probably drew a map that resembled Matthew Flinders’ map of 1814<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 5.
  • 6. Introduction<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />Draw Australia <br />How could you prove that it looks like this?<br />
  • 7. Introduction<br />Draw Australia <br />Or perhaps this?<br />A striking work by innovative Kiwirrkura artist Yukultji Napangati of the Papunya Tula school of artists. Yukultji's works capture the travels of ancestral women in the country surrounding where the Kiwirrkura community now stands. <br />from www.papunyatula.com.au<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 8. Introduction<br />Why ‘Australian’ History? Isn’t it supposed to be boring?<br />We emphasise history as a collective story that embodies the essence of the nation – it is the nation – and so endlessly contest it in an attempt to get it right. The intractable problem is that collectively, we all have an investment in this thing called history. We all have our own histories. That’s why it is fought so passionately.<br />Anna Clark, 2003, Moving Forward in a Time of Fear, www.manningclark.org.au/papers/AnnaClark.html<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 9. Introduction<br />Why ‘Australian’ History? Isn’t it supposed to be boring?<br />We emphasise history as a collective story that embodies the essence of the nation – it is the nation – and so endlessly contest it in an attempt to get it right. <br />Anna Clark, 2003, Moving Forward in a Time of Fear, www.manningclark.org.au/papers/AnnaClark.html<br />The concept of ‘imagined communities’<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 10. Introduction<br />The concept of ‘imagined communities’<br />One of the more influential of these minds has been Benedict Anderson who argues for a ‘need for a narrative of “identity”.’<br />‘Communities are to be distinguished, not by their falsity/genuineness, but by the style in which they are imagined.’<br />- Benedict Anderson<br />Anzac Day Parades stir nationalistic pride as Australians remember a particular historical narrative<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 11. ‘Benefit Concert’, 10 News, March 2009<br />Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Altl4tQ1IKE<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 12. ‘Australia Day on the Sunshine Coast’, 7 Local News, January 26, 2009<br />Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmEwLtpPy9Y<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 13. Introduction<br />Why ‘Australian’ History? Isn’t it supposed to be boring?<br />New Australian Curriculum incorporates aspects of Australian History in all year levels<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 14. Summary of where Australian History appears in the Australian History Curriculum K - 10 (draft)<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 15. Summary of where Australian History appears in the Australian History Curriculum K - 10 (draft)<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 16. Introduction<br />Why ‘Australian’ History? Isn’t it supposed to be boring?<br />We emphasise history as a collective story that embodies the essence of the nation – it is the nation – and so endlessly contest it in an attempt to get it right. The intractable problem is that collectively, we all have an investment in this thing called history. We all have our own histories. That’s why it is fought so passionately.<br />Anna Clark, 2003, Moving Forward in a Time of Fear, www.manningclark.org.au/papers/AnnaClark.html<br />Is it a case of my country, right or wrong?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 17. ‘My Country’ from the album Earth and Sun and Moon© 1993 Midnight Oil see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yIK084xZAA<br />Was it just a dream, were you so confusedWas it just a giant leap of logic<br />Was it the time of year,<br /> that makes a state of fearMethods were the motives for the actionAnd did I hear you sayMy country right or wrongDid you save your faceDid you breach your faithWomen, there were children at the shelterNow who can stop the hailWhen human senses failThere was never any warning, no escapeDid I hear you sayMy country right or wrongMy country oh so strongMy country going wrongMy country right or wrongI hear you say the truth must take a beatingThe flag a camouflage for your deceivingI know, yes I knowIt's written on your soulI know, we all make mistakes<br />This is not a case of blurred visionIt's a case of black holes, pocket holes, soul holes<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 18. What do you think is the intent of this song?<br />Write a 1 sentence summary of what you believe the intent of this song is<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 19. What do you think is the intent of this song?<br />Write a 1 sentence summary of what you believe the intent of this song is<br />Let’s PCQ this opinion. Is this a valid opinion to hold?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 20. Introduction<br />Topics:<br />How do we know about Australian History?<br />Various statements about Australian History <br />How do we teach our students to ‘read’ Australian history? <br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 21. What do we know about Australian History?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 22. What do we know about Australian History?<br />Settlement/Captain Cook/First Fleet<br />Aborigines<br />Gallipoli/Anzacs/WWI & WWII<br />Gold<br />Convicts<br />?????????? – try this rap<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 23. From the Melbourne Comedy Festival, 2009, screened channel 10 May, 2009<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXiXwYuGZoI&feature=related<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 24. How do we know what we know about Australian History?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 25. Parents<br />Friends<br />Newspapers<br />School/teachers<br />Films/TV/Radio<br />??????????????<br />How do we know what we know about Australian History?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 26. How do we know what we know about Australian History?<br />Recent American Study on asking if people had engaged in a history-related activity in previous twelve months found that<br />81% watched a movie or TV program<br />57% visited a museum or historical site<br />36% worked on family history<br />20% were part of a group that were studying or preserving the past (ranging from professionals to hobbyists eg railways)<br />90% looked at photos with family and friends<br />From S. Macintyre and A. Clark (2003) The History Wars. Melbourne University Press: Melbourne, p. 23.<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 27. Some statements about Australian History<br />What are the major features of the two approaches <br />to Australian history, as described by Geoffrey Blainey?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 28. Some statements about Australian History<br /> Geoffrey Blainey describes the ‘Black Armband’ view of Australian history, 1993<br /> <br /> To some extent my generation was reared on the Three Cheers view of history. This patriotic view of our past had a long run. It saw Australian history as largely a success. While the convict era was a source of shame or unease, nearly everything that came after was believed to be pretty good. <br /> <br /> There is a rival view, which I call the Black Armband view of history. In recent years it has assailed the optimistic view of history. The black armbands were quietly worn in official circles in 1988. The multicultural folk busily preached their message that until they arrived much of Australian history was a disgrace. <br /> <br /> The past treatment of Aborigines, of Chinese, of Kanakas, of non-British migrants, of women, the very old, the very young, and the poor was singled out, sometimes legitimately, sometimes not. ...<br /> The Black Armband view of history might well represent the swing of the pendulum from a position that had been too favourable, too self congratulatory, to an opposite extreme that is even more unreal and decidedly jaundiced.<br /> <br /> Geoffrey Blainey, The Latham Lecture, 1993, published as ‘Balance Sheet On Our History’, Quadrant, July 1993, pp. 10-15.<br /> <br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 29. Some statements about Australian History<br />Paul Keating - the ‘Redfern Speech’ 10 December 1992<br /> Ladies and gentlemen, I am very pleased to be here today at the launch of Australia's celebration of the 1993 International Year of the World's Indigenous People …. And, as I say, the starting point might be to recognize that the problem starts with us non-Aboriginal Australians. <br /> It begins, I think, with the act of recognition. Recognition that it was we who did the dispossessing. We took the traditional lands and smashed the traditional way of life. We brought the disasters. The alcohol. We committed the murders. We took the children from their mothers. We practised discrimination and exclusion. <br /> <br /> It was our ignorance and our prejudice. And our failure to imagine these things being done to us. With some noble exceptions, we failed to make the most basic human response and enter into their hearts and minds. We failed to ask - how would I feel if this were done to me? <br /> <br /> As a consequence, we failed to see that what we were doing degraded all of us. <br /> <br /> PM Paul Keating, Speech at Redfern Park, 10 December 1992 http://www.keating.org.au/cfm/details.cfm [accessed 12th March 2008]<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 30. Some statements about Australian History<br />What are the major features of the two approaches <br />to Australian history, as described by Blainey?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 31. Ann Curthoys argues that essentially there are two main types of readings of Australian History<br />Some statements about Australian History<br />Victimology<br />Triumphalist<br />vs<br /><ul><li>a study about those who wield power
  • 32. a catalogue of ‘shame’
  • 33. The ‘invasion’ of Australia
  • 34. Are we independently Australian or do we slavishly follow that which is British/American (depending on what perspective or period of time you are referring to)?
  • 35. Are we an Asian nation?
  • 36. Was there ‘genocide’ or ‘necessary casualties’ of a long-running frontier conflict
  • 37. Who controls the past? Hiding convict origins, control of gov’t records for 30 years, ASIO files, approval of draft before publication, is written Aboriginal really Aboriginal history?
  • 38. Is it social history, not political?
  • 39. a study about those who wield power
  • 40. a study of a successful transplant of British society
  • 41. ‘to foster love of home, country and race, and to elevate morally the coming man and woman’ – description of the purpose of early school curriculum during the Federation era
  • 42. Was Australia ‘settled’?
  • 43. Are we independently Australian ?
  • 44. Was there ‘genocide’ or ‘necessary casualties’ of a long-running frontier conflict
  • 45. Is it social history, not political?
  • 46. Is it to encourage a sense of nationalism and patriotic love of country?</li></ul>Curthoys, A. 2000. ‘Mythologies’, in R Nile, (ed). The Australian Legend and Its Discontents, UQP, Brisbane, pp. 11 – 41.<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 47. Ann Curthoys argues that essentially there are two main types of readings of Australian History<br />Some statements about Australian History<br />Black Armband<br />Three Cheers<br />vs<br /><ul><li>a study about those who wield power
  • 48. a catalogue of ‘shame’
  • 49. The ‘invasion’ of Australia
  • 50. Are we independently Australian or do we slavishly follow that which is British/American (depending on what perspective or period of time you are referring to)?
  • 51. Are we an Asian nation?
  • 52. Was there ‘genocide’ or ‘necessary casualties’ of a long-running frontier conflict
  • 53. Who controls the past? Hiding convict origins, control of gov’t records for 30 years, ASIO files, approval of draft before publication, is written Aboriginal really Aboriginal history?
  • 54. Is it social history, not political?
  • 55. a study about those who wield power
  • 56. a study of a successful transplant of British society
  • 57. ‘to foster love of home, country and race, and to elevate morally the coming man and woman’ – description of the purpose of early school curriculum during the Federation era
  • 58. Was Australia ‘settled’?
  • 59. Are we independently Australian ?
  • 60. Was there ‘genocide’ or ‘necessary casualties’ of a long-running frontier conflict
  • 61. Is it social history, not political?
  • 62. Is it to encourage a sense of nationalism and patriotic love of country?</li></ul>Curthoys, A. 2000. ‘Mythologies’, in R Nile, (ed). The Australian Legend and Its Discontents, UQP, Brisbane, pp. 11 – 41.<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 63. Some statements about Australian History<br />There are a number of ‘narrative understandings’ of Australian History:<br />Russell Ward’s Australian Legend <br />According to the myth the ‘typical Australian’ is a practical man, rough and ready in his manners and quick to decry an appearance of affectation in others. He is a great improviser, ever willing ‘to have a go’ at anything, but willing too to be content with a task done in a way that is ‘near enough’. Though capable of great exertion in an emergency, he normally feels no impulse to work hard without good cause. He swears hard and consistently, gambles heavily and often, and drinks deeply on occasion. Though he is ‘the world’s best confidence man’, he is usually taciturn rather than talkative, one who endures stoically rather than one who acts busily. He is a ‘hard case’, sceptical about the value of religion and of intellectual and cultural pursuits generally. He believes that Jack is not only as good as his master but, at least in principle, probably a good deal better, and so he is a great ‘knocker’ of eminent people unless, as in the case of his sporting heroes, they are distinguished by physical prowess. He is a fiercely independent person who hates officiousness and authority, especially when these qualities are embodied in military officers and policemen. Yet he is very hospitable and, above al, will stick to his mates through thick and think, even if he think they may be in the wrong. No epithet in his vocabulary is more completely damning than ‘scab’, unless it be ‘pimp’ used in its peculiarly Australasian slang meaning of ‘informer’. He tends to be a rolling stone, highly suspect of he should chance to gather much moss.<br />Ward, R 1958. The Australian Legend, OUP, Melbourne, p. 1 – 2.<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 64. The Australian Legend, as depicted to the ‘world’ in the opening minutes of the Opening Ceremony, Sydney Olympics, 2000<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBbkxoU5D_8<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 65. Some statements about Australian History<br />There are a number of ‘narrative understandings’ of Australian History:<br />Russell Ward’s Australian Legend <br />Victimology narrative <br />Exodus / Edward Said concept – the Fall (convictism), Exodus (transportation) and the Promised Land (The Home Country) – The Exodus narrative in reverse<br />The convicts<br />Pioneers – The Australian Legend eg ‘Said Hanrahan’ by John O’Brien<br />Quarrels with Nature eg. Bushfires, floods, Tim Flannery’s The Future Eaters thesis<br />Quarrels with Britain or the USA<br />Quarrels with Indigenous People<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 66. Frederick McCubbin<br />The Pioneers: What story is being told here?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 67. Some statements about Australian History<br />There are a number of ‘narrative understandings’ of Australian History:<br />Russell Ward’s Australian Legend <br />Victimology narrative <br />Multicultural discourse <br />Triumphalist<br />Heritage history <br />Gendered history<br />Elite history vs the ‘chattering classes’ – eg. Peer-reviewed history vs self-published history (eg. Published textbooks vs Stringer, C. Discovering Australia’s Christian Heritage)<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 68. How do we teach our students to read History?<br />Is it the compilation of facts telling ‘exactly as it happened’?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 69. How do we teach our students to read History?<br />Is it the compilation of facts telling ‘exactly as it happened’?<br />The emphasis is on ‘doing’ history ‑ on being involved in the processes of inquiry. Students encounter problems, seek out evidence, subject it to critical analysis and evaluation, and formulate explanations based on available sources.<br /> <br />Materials used are extensive ‑ documents, texts, illustrations, photographs, graphs, maps, video and film. Activities are varied – lecture, research, discussion, debate and excursion. Importance is placed on questioning, systematic reading, careful thinking and coherent, purposeful writing. <br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 70. How do we teach our students to read History?<br />Is it the compilation of facts telling ‘exactly as it happened’?<br />Acknowledgment and thanks goes to Dr. Brian Hoepper of QUT who introduced me to this concept in a workshop presented at NCC in 2008<br />Based on J. H. HexterThe History Primer<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 71. How do we teach our students to read History?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 72. How do we teach our students to read History?Awareness of changing understandings<br />How we tell history can be ‘negotiable’ over time ensuring that we need to be aware of cultural specificity, or the ‘Australian-ness’, of Australian texts <br />Eg. what is the difference between ‘sunbathe’ (England) or ‘sunbake’ (Australia)  indicative of a response to nature: under control or harsh and hostile<br />Cultural narratives about the hero reveal the ideology of the individual and his/her place in society<br />eg. difference between US and Australian myth of the hero; gender history – Australian masculinity is to be ‘male and dead‘<br />Compare <br />Gallipoli, dir. Peter Weir (1981)vs The Patriot, dir. Roland Emmerich (2000)<br />The progression of the death of Ned Kelly<br />Compare the death scene of Dan Kelly and Steve Hart from http://australianscreen.com.au/titles/story-kelly-gang/clip2/ and (ch. 18) Ned Kelly, dir. Gregor Jordan (2002) – <br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 73. The Story of the Kelly Gang, dir. Charles Tait (1906)<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 74. Ned Kelly, dir. Gregor Jordan (2002)<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 75. How do we teach our students to read History?Awareness of changing understandings<br />How we tell history can be ‘negotiable’ over time ensuring that we need to be aware of cultural specificity, or the ‘Australian-ness’, of Australian texts <br />Note how The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906) emphasises the notion of the Australian Legend whereas Ned Kelly (2002) emphasises a shift towards a more nuanced, gendered understanding of the Kelly story<br />How have ideas of Australian masculinity changed? <br />How might these representations have changed our understanding of Kelly history and Australian history in general?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 76. History Informs Culture?<br />Cultural Icon identity exercise: <br />Develop a series of symbols or icons that explain your cultural heritage in Australia. No words are allowed on your A3 sheet. <br />From a study performed by the Charles Sturt University: The National Photographic Project: http://www.facingaustralia.com/<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 77. ‘Miss Australia ... A quest for cultural identity in The Australian, Friday, October 21, 2005<br />What might the ‘Miss Australia’ competition tell you about what has been valued in our historical past?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 78. The winning poster in a B’nai B’rith society competition on the topic of advancing Australia fairly, in Denis Haskell, ‘Identity is a process, not a fixity’ in The Australian: Higher Education, Wednesday, July 25, 2007.<br />What might this competition tell you about what is valued in our historical past?<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 79. History Informs Culture?<br />The ‘Culture Wars’ is a term used to label the debates in Australia about the type of nation we should be – what values should be central, how society should be organised, how we should be governed, how we should relate to the rest of the world.<br />The cover of the CQU student magazine Summer 2008/9<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 80. History Informs Culture?<br />Cultural Icon identity exercise: <br />Australian cultural values involve an interaction between our traditional Anglo-Saxon and Celtic values, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, and those of our many migrants. It is a process of translation over which no one has control, and which links us to the world rather than defines us sharply by our differences from others. In a globalised world the best way to have a national identity is to have an international one first; multiculturalism is an enrichment, not a threat. It is curious that a government which is happy to have the Australian economy ruled by the invisible hand of the free market is not willing to allow for such invisible workings in the formation of cultural and national identity. <br />Denis Haskell, ‘Identity is a process, not a fixity’ in The Australian: Higher Education, Wednesday, July 25, 2007.<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 81. History Informs Culture?<br />Points of difference<br /><ul><li>Indigenous issues
  • 82. Health, education and transport services
  • 83. Work, industrial relations and unionism
  • 84. Human use of the natural environment
  • 85. Growth, affluence, consumerism
  • 86. Individual progress, social class, community
  • 87. Relations with oppressive regimes overseas</li></ul>'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 88. History Informs Culture?<br />Risdon Cove 1804: Settlement or Invasion?<br />Guerilla Warfare on the Australian Frontier or Peaceful Pastoral Expansion?<br />Progression of Ideas and Understandings<br />Accepted history of Australia<br />What type of nation should we be?<br />Acknowledgment and thanks goes to Dr. Brian Hoepper of QUT who developed this interpretation of how history informs culture<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 89. Where to from here? <br />Use documents and place them in the context of an issue or theme<br />(eg. investigate how competing narratives give different understandings of an historical or contemporary issue).<br />Don’t treat Australian History as a list of facts but a fascinating story that has multiple story-tellers and perspectives.<br />#1RULE<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 90. Where to from here? <br />Find a way to ‘love’ the history that you are teaching.<br />What grabs your imagination? What meta-stories help you to understand our nation’s historical complexity?<br />#2RULE<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 91. Where to from here? <br />Find a way to encourage students to critically engage.<br />What meta-stories can be used to help students understand these historical events? How can we use the learning tools of our profession to engage (MI; thinking skills; development of inquiry / research skills)?<br />#3RULE<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />
  • 92. Teaching Australian History successfully has long-term implications<br />Mrs Lynda Klimeck, my Year 11 Australian History teacher in Tasmania<br />'Australian History for Dummies', CSA Conference workshop, Citipointe, Brisbane, QLD, July 13, 2010 - Richard Leo MA(Hist) BA Dip.Ed., HOD Humanities Nambour Christian College; Sessional Lecturer in Australian and World History Christian Heritage College<br />

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