Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Blended Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Blended Learning

261

Published on

Sue Hines …

Sue Hines

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
261
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • 7 week class with 4 f2f weeks and 3 online weeks
  • MAOL 4 f2f with 3-4 weeks online all semester longNote: is this still occurring?
  • 2 Saturdays were removed- 10 hours seat time was reducedOnline learning is blended throughout the course
  • EDD blended course (summer residency)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Teaching a Blended Course Partners in Learning Sue Hines & Bob Andersen Saint Mary’s University of MN
    • 2. Blended Learning What do you think it is?
    • 3. What do the experts say? Blended learning is an instructional delivery approach where traditional face-2-face instruction & online instruction is combined.
    • 4. Types of Blending Models According to the Pew Foundation Project, there 3 models: 1. Supplemental model: Additional online learning is added to the full traditional f2f course. 2. Replacement model: Online learning replaces some of the class time (i.e. seat time) of the f2f course. 3. Emporium model: Entire traditional f2f is replaced with a learning resource center with computer mediated-instruction and live assistance. Source: Penn State University
    • 5. Which model represents your idea of a “blended course”? 1. Supplemental model: Additional online learning is added to the full traditional f2f course. 2. Replacement model: Online learning replaces some of the class time (i.e. seat time) of the f2f course. 3. Emporium model: Entire traditional f2f is replaced by a learning resource center with computer mediated-instruction and live assistance.
    • 6. Which model is a “flipped classroom”? 1. Supplemental model: Additional online learning is added to the full traditional f2f course. 2. Replacement model: Online learning replaces some of the class time (i.e. seat time) of the f2f course. 3. Emporium model: Entire traditional f2f is replaced by a learning resource center with computer mediated-instruction and live assistance.
    • 7. Which model sounds cool but Saint Mary’s doesn’t offer it? 1. Supplemental model: Additional online learning is added to the full traditional f2f course. 2. Replacement model: Online learning replaces some of the class time (i.e. seat time) of the f2f course. 3. Emporium model: Entire traditional f2f is replaced by a learning resource center with computer mediated-instruction and live assistance.
    • 8. Determining a Blend • The f2f and online blended structure is determined for you. • But how you design the f2f and online learning experience is up to you. • There is no one set way to do it. It’s your choice  • However, it’s not simply portioning out the course content between f2f and online sessions.
    • 9. Think about an integrated design • What is best learned online? • What is best learned face-to-face? • When and how long do we meet? • When and how long do we not meet? • How can a blend of online and f2f learning, given the schedule, result in the best learning outcome?
    • 10. Other Dimensions of Blended Delivery • • • • • • Synchronous & asynchronous Self-directed and instructor-led Self-paced or live & collaborative Deliberate & experiential Individual & group Passive & active learning
    • 11. Delivery mode suggestions: In-Class / Face to Face • Course introduction • Collaborative processing • Complex dialogues • Project presentations • Question / answer sessions • Demonstrations • Practice and debrief • Debates • Role Plays • Peer reviewing Out of class / online • Course content • Preparatory learning • Quizzing • Videos • Contemplative discussion • Reflective work • Resource listing/sharing • Collaborative products
    • 12. Module Design Models Flipped classroom: Content knowledge is initiated out-of-class, application is in-class (Bergman & Sams, 2012) Explore, Explain, Apply Learning Cycle: (Musallam, 2012) In-class inquiry, out-of-class content knowledge, in-class application Experiential Learning Model: (Kolb, 1983) Act – Reflect – Conceptualize - Apply Modified Experiential Learning Model: (Kolb, 1983; McCarthy, 1980) Current conceptions - add new knowledge – practice - apply
    • 13. So, a blended course might look like this:
    • 14. So, what do you think so far? Do you see any advantages? Disadvantages? Concerns? Reasons to smile?
    • 15. If you ask “blended” students… (and researchers have), What they want most in a blended course is: • Structure and organization – Oftentimes, this is more important than content • Integration between f2f and online learning – They want to feel a unified instructional experience – Not a collection of activities thrown together Ausburn, 2004 ; Aycock, 2002
    • 16. The instructional designing process is key • Designing a blended course is best accomplished with an instructional designer and SME. – Bob & Sue; and you  • Approach the process as a course “redesign” opposed to “conversion” • Realize that it takes time and effort
    • 17. Indicators of effective blended learning: Clear expectations Student expectations for participation and criteria for academic success is clearly stated and understood. Directions for weekly activities is key! Instructor as facilitator The instructor moves from distributor of knowledge to facilitator of learning. Students as self-directed learners Instructor orients students to the “blended design” of the course. Success = Being responsible for your learning. A community of learners The instructor and student work together to co-create the learning experience. Integrated learning experience The learning experience represents an well-crafted integration of reading, online/out-of-class learning, and in-class activities to achieve the course learning
    • 18. Delivering a Blended Course 5-step approach 1. Diagram the f2f and online course structure (Using your program’s online/f2f structure) 2. 3. 4. 5. Establish learning goal/s for each learning module Create an instructional plan for each module Determine the instructional materials Construct the learning modules
    • 19. 1. Diagram course meeting structure IN CLASS OUT OF CLASS Alternating weeks
    • 20. Or maybe it looks like this IN CLASS OUT OF CLASS Seat time in-class is low; Online time is high
    • 21. Or this… IN CLASS OUT OF CLASS In-class seat time is high: online is low (e.g. Saturdays are removed)
    • 22. Or this.. IN CLASS OUT OF CLASS Online time is continuous; with 2-3 days in class (@beginning or end)
    • 23. 2. Establish learning goal/s for each learning module Course Title: Student Learning Objectives: F2f or online? Module 1 Topical course content What is the course content to be taught for this week? Give it a title Learning goal/s What are the students expected to know, do, or appreciate by the end of the module? Try to link the goals to the graded assignment/s Module 2 Module 3 SLOs being taught Which SLOs are being met?
    • 24. 3. Create an instructional plan for each session Module #: Learning Goal/s: Online or F2F?: Evidence of learning Learning activity Description Length of time How will I determine or measure the student is proficient in this learning goal? What learning activity would allow for “the evidence of learning” to occur? What does the activity involve? How long does this activity take? Think of incremental developmental steps Describe it so you can duplicate it in the future
    • 25. 4. Determine the instructional materials Module #: Learning Goal/s: Online or F2F?: Evidence of learning Learning activity Description Length of time Materials Needed What could the students do to show they are learning (i.e. meeting the learning goals) What learning activity would allow for the evidence of learning to occur? What does the activity involve? How long does this activity take? What instructional technology is needed? Think of incremental developmental steps Describe it so you can duplicate it in the future What content materials? What physical materials?
    • 26. 5. Construct the learning modules • Build out each module in Blackboard • This can be time consuming • Take advantage of the tools in Blackboard • If possible build out the entire course before it’s launched
    • 27. Want to see an example? See the Blended Course Example handout
    • 28. Need more examples of how to create content? Take it away……..…Bob!
    • 29. Did you create a blended course? Care to share with us?

    ×