Functional Area Brief Presentation: Academic Advising

980 views
718 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
980
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
25
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • -elective systems and other curriculum innovations reflected expansion of knowledge at the end of the 19th century-technological advancements necessitated more educated people, thus college and university systems grew to match society’s need-expanded course offerings, more program choices, and greater diversity = educate whole student
  • Late 1820s – Kenyon College (OH) introduced first known formal system of academic advising. Each student was paired with a faculty member1876 – first system of advisors created at John Hopkins1890 – Harvard creates counseling group to advise first-years and incorporates an orientation component in English courses1928 – Association of American Colleges reportedly 60% of colleges surveyed having some form of freshman orientation including academic counseling1960s – falling enrollments, high attrition rates, and student demand for improved advising resulted in advising programs beginning to receive serious attention1970s – studies start linking student retention to academic advising1979 – National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) created to address issues and concerns of practitioners in academic advising1981 – ‘academic advising’ added as a descriptor to Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) retrieval system1981 – Academic Advising: Getting Us Through the Eighties published by AAHE/ERIC1983 – NACADA and American College Testing (ACT) established national recognition program for academic advisors and advising programs1984 – first ‘textbook’ published under the title Developmental Academic Advising1992 – Handbook of Academic Advising published2000 – Academic Advising: A Comprehensive Handbook published
  • Student purpose:Identifying options:Institutional purpose:
  • Pass out job descriptionsWhat are some things that jump out to you?
  • MEGHANReference handouts
  • Interpersonal: active listening, questioning, and referral skillsProblem solving: identify problem, diagnose problem, generate alternatives, select solutions, implement plan, evaluate and adjust as necessaryLearning and Development theories: explain complicated issues, assess developmental statusTechnology: increased tech mediums, more to know and be aware ofQUOTE cynical advisor article
  • Personal 1-1 relationship cannot be duplicated onlineLost opportunities for discussing other issues that may ariseSome students may not have immediate access to technologyStudents’ expectations of timely responses
  • Functional Area Brief Presentation: Academic Advising

    1. 1. + Academic Advising Meghan Morris | Rebecca Frost EDL 676: Foundations | Dr. David Perez II October 1, 2013
    2. 2. + Topics Covered  Evolution and Timeline of Academic Advising  Components of Advising  Values of Advising  Competencies, Responsibilities, and Skills of Advising  Current Challenges and Issues  Testimonies from Real Academic Advisors  Future Considerations
    3. 3. + What is Academic Advising?  An activity (or service) that colleges and universities provide to help students identify and develop suitable programs of study, seek enriching experiences, and expand horizons and opportunities  Fundamental expectation: students will decide from among alternatives the most appropriate direction to take in planning a program of study “Promise me you‟ll always remember: You‟re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” – A.A. Milne (Christopher Robin) Baldridge, A. (2013, September). Advising 100 acre wood style. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Academic-Advising-Today/ViewArticles/Advising-100-Acre-Wood-Style.aspx Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    4. 4. + Evolution  Academic “guidance” began in response to increasingly complex curriculum at the end of the 19th century  First systems of advising designed to help students “select those programs which were best suited their needs and interests”  Concern for educating the whole student Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    5. 5. + Timeline Late 1820s: Kenyon College (OH) First known formal academic advising 1876: First system of advisors created at Hopkins 1890: Harvard creates counseling group to advise firstyears 1960s: Demand for improving advising systems 1979: National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) founded 1981: „Academic advising‟ added as a descriptor to Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    6. 6. + Professional Association: NACADA  National Academic Advising Association The National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) is an association of professional advisors, counselors, faculty, administrators, and students working to enhance the educational development of students.  http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/ (2013). About NACADA. Retrieved from: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/About-Us.aspx
    7. 7. + Prescriptive vs. Developmental  Two advising relationships    Prescriptive, based on authority Developmental, based on development Advisors serve as the “bridge between students‟ present environment and students‟ environment to be” (Goetz, p. 93). Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    8. 8. + Advising vs. Counseling  Advising more restrictive than counseling; faculty advising reserved for aiding a student in planning academic program  Faculty-Advising as Three-Part Activity Identifying institutional purpose Identifying student purpose Assisting students to identify options Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    9. 9. + Three Components of Advising Curriculum (what advising deals with) Student Learning Outcomes (results of academic advising) Pedagogy (how advising does what it does) Council for the advancement of standards in higher education: the role of academic advising programs. (2011) (pp. 1–17). Retrieved from http://www.cas.edu/getpdf.cfm?PDF=E864D2C4-D655-8F742E647CDECD29B7D0
    10. 10. +
    11. 11. + Job Descriptions What elements stand out to you?
    12. 12. + Competencies  Foundations of Knowledge (Conceptual)   Theoretical frameworks  NACADA core values   Advising philosophy Knowledge of higher education issues including legal and ethical Knowledge of College Student Characteristics (Informational)  General knowledge of college students  Specific knowledge of population(s) advised Academic advisor competencies. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/DesktopModules/DnnForge NewsArticles/Print.aspx?tabid=3318&tabmoduleid=278&articleId=71&moduleId=587&PortalID=0
    13. 13. + Competencies Continued  Career Advising Knowledge and Skills (Informational)    Knowledge of academic major Knowledge of occupational, workplace relationships Communication and Interpersonal Skills (Relational)   Demonstrate ability to relate to individuals and groups of designated students through the use of basic communication, helping, and problem-solving skills Knowledge of Application of Advising at Local Institution (Informational)  Institution information  Referral resources  Graduation requirements  Technology use Academic advisor competencies. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/DesktopModules/DnnForge NewsArticles/Print.aspx?tabid=3318&tabmoduleid=278&articleId=71&moduleId=587&PortalID=0
    14. 14. + Six Responsibilities of Academic Advising 1. Clarifying values and identifying goals 2. Understanding institution of higher education 3. Giving pertinent information 4. Planning programs that reflect students‟ abilities and interests 5. Conducting program assessments 6. Referring to institutional resources “Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it.” (Winnie the Pooh) Baldridge, A. (2013, September). Advising 100 acre wood style. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Academic-Advising-Today/View-Articles/Advising100-Acre-Wood-Style.aspx Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    15. 15. + Skills of Advisors Interpersonal Skills ProblemSolving Skills Understanding and Applying Learning and Developmental Theories Understanding and Utilizing Technologies Schuh, J. H., Jones, S. R., Harper, S. R. (Eds.). (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.
    16. 16. + Current Challenges and Issues  For Students   special population advising   relationship of advising to retention developmental models of advising For Advisors   recognition and reward factors  assessment of advising   advisor workloads training and staff development of advisors Organizational Issues  reporting lines and structures  addressing the changing student populations  technology in advising Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    17. 17. + Additional Challenges and Issues  Serving underrepresented students  Strained for resources  Multiple advisors for one student  Federal policies, i.e. financial aid eligibility  Parents & privacy laws “You can‟t stay in your corner of the forest, waiting for others to come to you; you have to go to them sometimes.” (Winnie the Pooh) Baldridge, A. (2013, September). Advising 100 acre wood style. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Academic-Advising-Today/View-Articles/Advising100-Acre-Wood-Style.aspx Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates. Schuh, J. H., Jones, S. R., Harper, S. R. (Eds.). (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.
    18. 18. + Uses and Implications of Technologies  Support advising systems   Advising websites and online institutional documents  Transfer systems for courses and credits   Degree audits Easier documentation of advising sessions Delivery of advising  Email and 24/7 access to advisor  24/7 access to institutional and program requirements  Social media Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates. Schuh, J. H., Jones, S. R., Harper, S. R. (Eds.). (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.
    19. 19. + Testimonies from Real Academic Advisors! If you could change one aspect of your position to better help students, what would you do? “Have a more comprehensive training program for advisors at all levels. Make it consistent, standardized…so we can keep up with all of the changes” (C. Branson, personal communication, September 5, 2013). “I wouldn‟t answer email. Or wouldn‟t solve everything by email. Because conversation is better and more for the students‟ benefit. Email is effective, but it‟s also a burden” (C. White, personal communication, September 6, 2013).
    20. 20. + Testimonies from Real Academic Advisors! What is the most rewarding part of your job? “When a student walks in super-stressed, and leaves feeling better. When I can take their anxiety down twenty notches through conversation” (C. Branson, personal communication, September 5, 2013). “Seeing students graduate and achieve the goals they set out for themselves. When they finally choose a major that clicks” (C. White, personal communication, September 6, 2013).
    21. 21. + Future Considerations  Decentralized "silo" approach to services or integrated so that it becomes fundamental to campus culture?  Partnership with career services?  Needed only when a student needs to register for classes or consistent relationship?  Establishing assessment mechanisms attached to institutional goals and reward systems  Collecting trend data  Monitoring advising reports online for accuracy and access  Actively engage students in their own planning: feedback  Development of a "theory" of advising Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates.
    22. 22. + Discussion: Articles What are your thoughts?
    23. 23. + References (2013). About NACADA. Retrieved from: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/About-Us.aspx Academic advisor competencies. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/DesktopModules/DnnForge NewsArticles/Print.aspx?tabid=3318&tabmoduleid=278&articleId=71&moduleId=587&PortalID=0 Baldridge, A. (2013, September). Advising 100 acre wood style. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Academic-Advising-Today/View-Articles/Advising100-Acre-Wood-Style.aspx Council for the advancement of standards in higher education: the role of academic advising programs. (2011) (pp. 1–17). Retrieved from http://www.cas.edu/getpdf.cfm?PDF=E864D2C4-D655-8F742E647CDECD29B7D0 Goetz, J. (2004). Academic Advising. In Rentz‟s Student Affairs in Higher Education (pp. 89– 107). MacKinnon Associates. Schuh, J. H., Jones, S. R., Harper, S. R. (Eds.). (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc. The statement of core values of academic advising. (2005). Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Portals/0/Clearinghouse/advisingissues/cv-decl.pdf

    ×