Mummification

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The process of mummifying the dead of Ancient Egypt

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Mummification

  1. 1. Making a mummy was a The priest in charge wore a complicated job! First the jackal mask and represented dead person’s brain and the Egyptian God called some other organs were Anubis. removed and put in jars called canopic jars. Then the body was covered with An amulet was placed with the salts and left to dry for up mummy for luck. to 40 days. When the body was dry if was stuffed with linen and These are the canopic jars other things to help it keep that contained the liver, it’s shape. Then it was oiled stomach, intestines and lungs and bound tightly with linen of the dead person. The heart bandages. was not removed. Each jar represented a god. www.communication4all.co.uk Pictures used available from Miles Kelly Clip Art, Dorling Kindersley, and www.istockphoto.com
  2. 2. The Ancient Egyptians also sometimes mummified their favourite pets. Mummification was expensive so it would generally be something that would happen when When it was ready for burial, a mummy a nobleman or pharaoh had died. was placed in a special case, Some were This picture shows a mummified dog simple wooden boxes but others would and cat but a mummified crocodile was be shaped like the mummy and richly once discovered by archaeologists! It decorated. was over four and a half meters long! If the mummy was an important person, like a pharaoh or nobleman, it would then be sealed inside a stone coffin A mask called a ’death mask’ was fitted called a sarcophagus. over the face of a mummy. The Egyp- tians believed that this helped the dead person’s spirit recognise the mummy later on. A pharaoh’s mask would have Tutankhamen's death mask been made from gold and jewels. www.communication4all.co.uk

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