Reference Simone de Beauvoir 1976 The Ethics of Ambuguity NY
Citadel Press translated from the French by Bernard Frechtman...
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Simone de beauvoir 1976 the ethics of ambuguity ny citadel press translated from the french by bernard frechtman c 1948

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Simone de Beauvoir, Feminism, Women, Gender, Rey Ty, Existentialism, Sartre

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Simone de beauvoir 1976 the ethics of ambuguity ny citadel press translated from the french by bernard frechtman c 1948

  1. 1. Reference Simone de Beauvoir 1976 The Ethics of Ambuguity NY Citadel Press translated from the French by Bernard Frechtman c 1948 Rey Tys Notes “From the very beginning, existentialism defined itself as a philosophy of ambiguity. It was by affirming the irreducible character of ambiguity that Kierkegaard opposed himself to Hegel, and it is by ambiguity that, in (p. 9) our own generation Sartre, in Being and Nothingness, fundamentally defined man, that being whose being is not to be, that subjectivity which realizes itself only as a presence in the world, that engaged freedom, that surging of the for-oneself which is immediately given for others. But it is also claimed that existentialism is a philosophy of the absurd and of despair” (Beauvoir, p. 10). “It is a matter of knowing whether he wants to live and under what conditions” (Beauvoir, p. 15). “…his (human) acts are definitive, absolute engagements. He bears the responsibility for a world which is not the work of a strange power, but of himself, where his defeats are inscribed, and his victories as well….One can not start by saying that our earthly destiny has or has not importance, for it depends upon us to give it importance. It is up to man to make it important to be a man, and he alone can feel his success or failure…” (Beauvoir, p. 16). “…what revelation can a coherent humanism hope to oppose to the testimony which man brings to bear upon himself? So Marxists often find themselves having to confirm this belief in freedom, even if they have to reconcile it with determination as well as they can” (Beauvoir, p. 21). “Man is free; but he finds his law in his very freedom. First, he must assume his freedom and not flee it; he assumes it by a constructive movement: one does not exist without doing something; and also by a negative movement which rejects oppressive for oneself and others. In construction, as in rejection, it is a matter of reconquering freedom on the contingent facticity of existence that is, of taking the given, which, at the start, is there without any reason, as something willed by man” (Beauvoir, p. 156).

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