Philippine Youth Leadership Program
Year 9
Building a New Generation of Citizens
as Catalysts for Social Change
Edited by ...
Funded by the U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
Youth Programs Division
© 2013 Edited by...
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This book is a collection of essays that our program participants have written. All submissions are the intellectual...
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PEOPLE IN THE PROGRAM 7
Program Planning and Administration..........................................
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BELEN, ALEXIS E. ......................................................................................................
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LUKMAN, FAZNIYARA C....................................................................................................
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PEOPLE IN THE PROGRAM
Program Planning and Administration
Associate Provost, Division of International Programs Debo...
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PROFILE OF ADULT LEADERS
Last Name First Name
Middle
Name
Gender Ethnicity Religion Occupation
23. Abdurajak Al-Fraz...
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NIU PROFESSIONAL STAFF
(Listed alphabetically by last name)
Dr. Lina Ong, Director of the International Training Off...
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Leslie Shive is the Program Coordinator of the International Training Office, Northern Illinois Uni-
versity. She h...
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RESOURCE PERSONS
Chris Birks worked as a journalist for nearly 20 years before becoming a teacher. He is Assistant ...
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Bashir Martin works with Project Nur in Washington, D.C. Nur is an Arabic word which means ―enlighten-
ment‖. Proje...
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Rev. Father Primo Racimo is the pastor of St. Margaret of Scotland Episcopal Church in Chicago, Illi-
nois. He is a...
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CURRENT PHILIPPINE CONTEXT
THE “FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT”: RENEWED HOPE FOR A PATHWAY TO PEACE IN MINDANAO
Dr. Susan Rus...
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clans in the ARMM. It also enables the MILF leaders and supporters to form a party themselves and compete in the 20...
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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
PHILIPPINE YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM YEAR 8
BUILDING A NEW GENERATION OF CITIZENS AS CATALYSTS F...
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Program Coordinator: Leslie Shive
Training Coordinator: Dr. Rey Ty
Full-Time Training Assistant: Srie Ramli
Part-Ti...
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o Millennium Park
o Architecture Cruise
o Navy Pier
Northern Illinois Region
o Pres. Reagan‘s Home in Dixon, IL
o K...
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PYLP PARTICIPANT RATINGS OF THE HOMESTAY EXPERIENCE
12. Please rate the Homestay experience.
Very
High
High Moderat...
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In general, participants reported a high level of satisfaction with classroom sessions, field visits, and logistics...
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ACTION PLANS
Each participant developed an achievable and practical action plan that was related to the program obj...
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CHAPTER 1: CRITICAL REFLECTION
BELOVED MINDANAO TO WHOM I BELONG: UNTO HIM I SHALL SERVE AND RETURN.
ABDURAJAK, AL-...
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CAUSE AND SOLUTION
ALI, SAMIR PANGCATAN JR
Mindanao Situation
When we left mindanao, we left it with love but the p...
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THE VOICE OF A YOUNG MINDANAOAN
ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C.
I. IRONY IN CONFLICTS
Mindanao is the second largest island in...
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III. APPLYING THE KNOWLEDGE
As youth leaders and catalysts for social change, we should always remember that we can...
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could explain your goal to not just one person in Mindanao but to many, you will know many other people whom you sh...
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program that we do have. Being responsible is one of the most important things that I think I have learned too much...
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III. Community Project
As a young child growing up in the Philippines, I remember a lot of interaction with peers, ...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
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Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
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Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb,...
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Philippine Youth Leadership Program. (2013). Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University

  1. 1. Philippine Youth Leadership Program Year 9 Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change Edited by Susan Russell, Lina Ong, Leslie Shive, & Rey Ty © 2013 International Training Office Northern Illinois University
  2. 2. Funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Youth Programs Division © 2013 Edited by Susan Russell, Lina Davide-Ong, Leslie Shive, & Rey Ty International Training Office Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois U.S.A. Philippine Youth Leadership Program PYLP 9 April 14 – May 16, 2012 Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change
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  4. 4. - 3 - This book is a collection of essays that our program participants have written. All submissions are the intellectual property of the original writers. Please let us know of errors and omissions. Philippine Youth Leadership Program (PYLP) Building a New Generation of Citizens as Catalysts for Social Change Open Access Publishing This is an open access publication. This book is not for sale. It is printed for educational purposes only. Individual authors retain ownership of the copyright for their articles. Any item that appears in this book may be retrieved without permission. However, when this material is quoted or reproduced, the author and title of the item must be cited. Appropriate attribution can be provided by acknowledging the publisher, citing the original author of the work, citing the original article or book properly, and date of the publication in which the item appeared, which does not in any way suggest that we endorse you or your use of the work. For any reuse or redistribution of a work, you must also make clear the terms under which the work was reproduced. Open access to, and free use of, original work ensures the publication is freely and openly available. You may not use this work for commercial purposes. © 2013 International Training Office, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, U.S.A. Internet: http://www.niu.edu/ITO/ index.shtml Disclaimer All ideas expressed here belong to the individual authors. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this volume do not necessarily reflect the views of the International Training Office. Content, style, editing, and proofreading were the responsibility of each author or group of authors. All errors and omissions are those of the contributors. Index •Action plan. •Advocacy. •Bangsa Moro. •Basic literacy. •Citizenship, democracy, diversity, and human rights. •Civic en- gagement. •Civic participation. •Community projects. •Community service. •Conflict resolution. •Conflict management. •Conflict transformation. •Critical reflection. •Development. •Direct action. •Diversity. •Environmentalism. •Hip-Hop. •Human Rights. •Income generating projects. •Indigenous peoples. •Inter-ethnic dialogue. •Interfaith dialogue. •Intra-ethnic dialogue. •Intra-faith dialogue. •Lumad. •Mindanao. •Minorities. •Multiculturalism. •Peace. •Peace building. •Philippines. •Program evaluation. •Program implementation. •Program planning. •Project proposal writing. •Relief. •Service learning. •Social action. •Social justice. •Southern Philippines. •Sports. •U.S. cultures. •Volunteer work. •Youth leadership. Production Credits Printer: Northern Illinois University Printed in the United States of America Photos by Participants, Staff, International Training Office, Northern Illinois University and World Wide Web Funded by The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Youth Programs Division Theme of the Cover Photo: The Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front reached a Framework for a Peace Agreement on October 13, 2012. The first section of the framework declares: ―The Parties agree that the status quo is unacceptable and that the Bangsamoro shall be established to replace the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). The Bangsamoro is the new autonomous political entity (NPE) referred to in the Decision Points of Principles as of April 2012.‖ In connection to the positive developments in the Philippines, the photo on the cover page symbolizes the unity of indigenous peoples, Mus- lims and Christians in the Philippines.
  5. 5. - 4 - TABLE OF CONTENTS PEOPLE IN THE PROGRAM 7 Program Planning and Administration........................................................................................7 PROFILE OF YOUTH LEADERS.......................................................................................................7 PROFILE OF ADULT LEADERS .......................................................................................................8 NIU PROFESSIONAL STAFF...........................................................................................................9 RESOURCE PERSONS...................................................................................................................11 CURRENT PHILIPPINE CONTEXT 14 THE ―FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT‖: RENEWED HOPE FOR A PATHWAY TO PEACE IN MINDANAO 14 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 16 PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ...........................................................................................16 PROGRAM MONITORING AND EVALUATION.............................................................................21 CHAPTER 1: CRITICAL REFLECTION 22 ABDURAJAK, AL-FRAZKHAN PANDAO........................................................................................22 ALI, SAMIR PANGCATAN JR........................................................................................................23 ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C..............................................................................................................24 ANGIN, AKIMAH H. U.................................................................................................................25 BARREDO, CRISELINE.................................................................................................................26 BELEN, ALEXIS E. ......................................................................................................................27 CABUYOC, ORLAND C................................................................................................................28 CANDIDO, ARWALD....................................................................................................................30 Dela Cruz, John Xyrious ...........................................................................................................31 GONZALEZ, JUDEAN GRACE .......................................................................................................33 GONZALES, RENA JEAN..............................................................................................................35 LAO, AQUISAH-ROHAIMAH ........................................................................................................36 LUKMAN, FAZNIYARA C.............................................................................................................37 MACARAO, SOHAYA...................................................................................................................38 MAGNO, DOROTHY ....................................................................................................................40 MALA, HASSAN SHANNE............................................................................................................43 MALIDA, JOVEN RYAN G............................................................................................................44 MASTURA, CEDRICK CABALES...................................................................................................47 NAVARRO, MARIA JOANNA........................................................................................................49 PACIS, CHRISTINE LOUISE ..........................................................................................................51 PANCHO, CINDY .........................................................................................................................52 PASAWILAN, AL QADIR..............................................................................................................54 ROMERO, RAFAEL JR..................................................................................................................55 SUMAGAYSAY, NIKKI LYN .........................................................................................................57 TITO, BAI JEANINE M. ................................................................................................................58 CHAPTER 2: PROJECT PROPOSALS AND ACTION PLANS.........................................60 ABDURAJAK, AL-FRAZKHAN PANDAO........................................................................................60 ALI, SAMIR PANGCATAN JR........................................................................................................64 ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C..............................................................................................................66 ANGIN, AKIMAH H.U. ................................................................................................................69 BARREDO, CRISELINE T..............................................................................................................73
  6. 6. - 5 - BELEN, ALEXIS E. ......................................................................................................................76 CABUYOC, ORLAND C................................................................................................................82 CANDIDO, ARWALD....................................................................................................................87 DAIL, MORENA E. ......................................................................................................................91 DELA CRUZ, JOHN XYRIOUS Q...................................................................................................96 GALVEZ, JUDEAN GRACE .........................................................................................................104 GONZALES, RENA JEAN M........................................................................................................111 LAO, AQUISAH-ROHAIMAH ......................................................................................................116 LUKMAN, FAZNIYARA C...........................................................................................................119 MACARAO, SOHAYA T. ............................................................................................................122 MAGNO, DOROTHY ENA G.......................................................................................................127 MALA, HASSAN SHANNE C. .....................................................................................................132 MALIDA, JOVEN RYAN G..........................................................................................................135 MASTURA, CEDRICK CABALES.................................................................................................144 NAVARRO, MARIA JOANNA, RN...............................................................................................153 PACIS, CHRISTINE LOUISE C.....................................................................................................159 PANCHO, CINDY .......................................................................................................................164 PASAWILAN, AL QADIR............................................................................................................167 ROMERO, RAFAEL C.................................................................................................................172 SUMAGAYSAY, NIKKI LYN L....................................................................................................177 TITO, BAI JEANINE M. ..............................................................................................................181 CHAPTER 3: SPEECHES AND CREATIVE WRITING..................................................187 DAIL, MORENA ENRIQUEZ........................................................................................................187 ABDURAJAK, AL-FRAZKHAN....................................................................................................188 ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C............................................................................................................188 MASTURA, CEDRICK CABALES.................................................................................................189 MALIDA, JOVEN RYAN G..........................................................................................................190 PASAWILAN, AL QADIR............................................................................................................191 PLEDGE OF COMMITMENT ........................................................................................................191 DECLARATION OF COMMITMENT..............................................................................................192 THANKS, AND BYE BYE............................................................................................................194 TODAY .....................................................................................................................................195 CHAPTER 4: PHOTO ESSAYS OF PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION ...........................196 AL-FRAZKHAN P. ABDURAJAK.................................................................................................196 ALI, SAMIR PANGCATAN JR......................................................................................................198 ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C............................................................................................................199 ANGIN, AKIMAH H.U. ..............................................................................................................201 BARREDO, CRISELINE T............................................................................................................204 BELEN, ALEXIS E. ....................................................................................................................206 CABUYOC, ORLAND C..............................................................................................................210 CANDIDO, ARWALD A.............................................................................................................212 DAIL, MORENA E. ....................................................................................................................214 DELA CRUZ, JOHN XYRIOUS Q.................................................................................................217 GALVEZ, JUDEAN GRACE .........................................................................................................219 GONZALES, RENA JEAN M........................................................................................................222 LAO, AQUISAH-ROHAIMAH ......................................................................................................225
  7. 7. - 6 - LUKMAN, FAZNIYARA C...........................................................................................................227 MACARAO, SOHAYA T. ............................................................................................................229 MAGNO, DOROTHY ENA G.......................................................................................................231 MALA, HASSAN SHANNE C. .....................................................................................................235 MALIDA, JOVEN RYAN G..........................................................................................................237 MASTURA, CEDRICK CABALES.................................................................................................239 NAVARRO, MARIA JOANNA......................................................................................................242 PACIS, CHRISTINE LOUISE C.....................................................................................................246 PANCHO, CINDY .......................................................................................................................249 PASAWILAN, DATU AL QADIR ABDUL .....................................................................................250 ROMERO, RAFAEL C.................................................................................................................253 SUMAGAYSAY, NIKKI LYN L....................................................................................................255 TITO, BAI JEANINE M. ..............................................................................................................257 MEDIA COVERAGE 259 PHOTO AND ART GALLERY 264
  8. 8. - 7 - PEOPLE IN THE PROGRAM Program Planning and Administration Associate Provost, Division of International Programs Deborah Pierce Director, International Training Office Lina Davide-Ong Co-Directors of the Philippine Youth Leadership Program Susan Russell & Lina Davide-Ong Program Coordinator Leslie Shive Divison of International Programs Business Manager Pam Rosenberg Training Coordinator Rey Ty Full-Time Training Assistant Srie Ramli Part-Time Training Assistants Hala Hweio & Saima Newaz-Karim Intern Maria Ahmad PROFILE OF YOUTH LEADERS Last Name First Name Middle Name Gender Ethnicity Religion Occupation 1. Ali Samir Jr. Pangcatan Male Maranao Islam High School (HS) Student 2. Ang Alyssa Ma- rie Cabase Female Others Roman Catho- licism (RC) HS Student 3. Angin Akimah Hadji Unos Female Maranao Islam HS Student 4. Barredo Criseline Toribio Female Zamboangueño RC College Student 5. Belen Alexis Elegino Female Davaoueño RC HS Student 6. Cabuyoc Orland Coronel Male Bagobo RC College Student 7. Candido Arwald Apolinario Male Zamboangueño RC College Student 8. Dail Morena Enriquez Female Tausug Islam HS Student 9. Dela Cruz John Xy- rious Quilala Male Cebuano RC College Student 10. Galvez Judean Grace De Castro Female Zamboangueño Protestant College Student 11. Gonzales Rena Jean Muyco Female Davaoueño 7th Day Ad- ventist College Student 12. Lao Aquisah- Rohaimah H. Amer Female Maranao Islam HS Student 13. Lukman Fazniyara Campomayor Female Tausug Islam College Student 14. Macarao Sohaya Taratingan Female Maranao Islam HS Student 15. Magno Dorothy Ena Gargar Female Cebuano Protestant HS Student 16. Mala Hassan Shanne Cabato Male Maranao Islam HS Student 17. Pacis Christine Louise Cabato Female Ilonggo Protestant HS Student 18. Pancho Cindy Daymiel Female Maranao Islam HS Student 19. Pasawilan Al Qadir Abdul Male Maguindanaoan Islam College Student 20. Romero Rafael Jr. Carin Male Cebuano RC College Student 21. Sumagaysay Nikki Lyn Lamzon Female Ilonggo Iglesia ni Cris- to HS Student 22. Tito Bai Jeanine Malayang Female Maguindanaoan RC College Student
  9. 9. - 8 - PROFILE OF ADULT LEADERS Last Name First Name Middle Name Gender Ethnicity Religion Occupation 23. Abdurajak Al-Fraz Khan Pandao Male Tausug Islam Police Officer 24. Malida Joven Ryan Guinang Male B‘laan Protestant High School Teacher 25. Mastura Cedrick Cabales Male Maguindanaoan Islam Legislative Staff Offic- er 26. Navarro Maria Joanna Estaño Female Cebuano RC Staff Nurse
  10. 10. - 9 - NIU PROFESSIONAL STAFF (Listed alphabetically by last name) Dr. Lina Ong, Director of the International Training Office, is an alumna of the University of the Philippines in Diliman, and a former member of the faculty of UP College-Cebu. Dr. Ong has more than a decade of experience in developing international training programs that are appropriate to learn- ers from diverse cultural backgrounds. Dr. Ong served as the administrative director of the ACCESS- Philippine Youth Leadership Programs (2004-2011), the ARMM Philippines Majority-Minority Pro- gram (2005), the Cultural Citizens Program (2008), the Philippine Minorities Program (2010), and the Fulbright American Studies Summer Institute on Contemporary American Literature (2002 – 2004). Dr. Ong obtained her Doctor of Education degree in 1995 from Northern Illinois University in De- Kalb, Illinois. Dr. Deborah Pierce is Associate Provost for International Programs and Adjunct Assistant Professor of French at Northern Illinois University, where she is also a faculty associate of the Title VI funded Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Previously she served as Director of International Affairs and Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Loyola University Chicago. She earned her Ph.D. in Linguistics degree from the University of Michigan and has worked in international education for over twenty years. Her prima- ry professional interests are curriculum internationalization, conflict transformation, leadership training, and Southeast Asian studies. She chaired the 2010 Annual Conference Committee of NAFSA: Associa- tion of International Educators and has also served on the national boards of the Association of Interna- tional Education Administrators and Phi Beta Delta Honor Society. Pamela Rosenberg is the Business Administrative Associate of the Divison of International Programs since October 2005 to the present. From February 2003 to October 2005, she was the Business Admin- istrative Associate of University Libraries. From November 2001 to February 2003, she was the Study Abroad, Registrar of the Study Abroad Office. In 1995, she received her Master of Science in Educa- tion focusing on Sport Management. In 1993, she received her Bachelor of Science in Marketing, mi- nor in English. Dr. Susan Russell is a cultural anthropologist with specific interests in economic anthropology and the Philippines. Her research has focused on the relationship between ritual and economy and on the role of peasant economic institutions in upland and maritime societies. She has conducted research with upland Ibaloi and Kankana-ey peoples in Luzon, street vendors in Manila, and fishermen in both Thailand and the Philippines. She was a visiting professor at the School of Economics, University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City. Professor Russell is a core member of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at NIU. She teaches courses in Southeast Asian cultures, corporate cultures, economic anthropology, and introductory anthropology. She has been the Project Director for all of the Philippine projects funded at ITO by the U.S. Department of State. She is currently conducting research on peacebuilding NGOs in Mindanao and is a Presidential Engagement Professor at NIU since 2011.
  11. 11. - 10 - Leslie Shive is the Program Coordinator of the International Training Office, Northern Illinois Uni- versity. She has served as the host family coordinator for the Philippine Youth Leadership Program (PYLP) from year two through the present. In addition, she coordinated the homestays for the six Southeast Asia Leadership Programs (SEAYLP) facilitated by the university‘s Center for Southeast Asian Studies, fall 2009 through spring 2012. Currently, Dr. Rey Ty is the Training Coordinator of the International Training Office of the Divi- sion of International Programs of Northern Illinois University. He gives intercultural orientation to new international students coming to study in the U.S. as well as U.S. students participating in Study Abroad programs. He received his doctorate from Northern Illinois University. The title of his dis- sertation was ―Human rights, conflict transformation, and peace building: The state, NGOs, social movements, and civil society—The struggle for power, social justice and social change.‖ His first M.A. was from the University of California at Berkeley; and, his second M.A., from Northern Illi- nois University. Dr. Ty taught Political Science at the University of the Philippines from 1986 to 1996 where he also served as Assistant Chair of the Department of Political Science. He was the Special Projects Coordinator, Technical Consultant, and later the first Director of the Public Information and Education Ser- vices of the Presidential Committee of Human Rights under President Corazon Aquino. During this time, he was a member of a core group that developed the strategic plan of the Commission on Human Rights and engaged in the organizational development of Amnesty International (AI) Philippines. Dr. Ty served as Vice-Chair of Amnesty International Philippines, Citizens Alliance for Consumer Protection (CACP), Defense for Children International Philippines (DCI), Ecumenical Movement for Justice and Peace, and Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA). He also served as Director of the Human Rights Institute of the Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP). The United Nations invited him to be a ―non-governmental individual‖ (NGI) in several international conferences held in Montreal, Canada (UNESCO), Bang- kok, Thailand (U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific), Vienna, Austria (U.N. World Conference on Human Rights), and Kathmandu, Nepal (Human Rights Training for Public Offices and NGOs, organized by the Interna- tional Institute for Human Rights, Environment and Development). Dr Ty was also a member of an international teaching team for the Centre international de formation pour l'enseignement des droits de l'homme et de la paix (International Train- ing Centre for Human Rights and Peace Teaching) in Geneva, Switzerland, where he used English, French, and Spanish as the medium of instruction, to teach international human rights, international humanitarian law, and peace to teachers from all over the world. His education also includes certificate courses at the University of Paris, Sorbonne and International Institute of Human Rights, Strasbourg, France.
  12. 12. - 11 - RESOURCE PERSONS Chris Birks worked as a journalist for nearly 20 years before becoming a teacher. He is Assistant Pro- fessor at Benedictine University where he teaches journalism and web design (new media). He is also the advisor for Candor, which is the student newspaper of Benedictine University. He studied Com- munications at Northern Illinois University. Chris has over a decade of public speaking experience, mostly leading discussions on the role of the media in society. Chris lives in Geneva, Illinois. Stanley Edward Francis Campbell is a Vietnam War veteran. He is the executive director of Rock- ford Urban Ministries and chair of the Rockford Peace & Justice group. Stan has traveled to Colom- bia, Iran, and Nicaragua. He conducts workshops for urban areas of Rockford, Illinois. He studied Human Services at Rock Valley College. Dr. Janice Hamlet is an associate professsor in the Department of Communications at Northern Illinois University. She teaches rhetoric and public communication. Dr. Hamlet studied at Ohio State University (Ph.D.). Her areas of expertise include intercultural/multicultural communication, rhetori- cal studies, womanist epistemology and methodology, communication and spirituality, and nonverbal communication. Gerald Hankerson is the Outreach Coordinator for the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). Gerald recruits and coordinates CAIR-Chicago interns, externs, and volunteers. A native of the Oakland and Hyde Park neighborhoods, he is a graduating President's Scholar of the Univer- sity of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and is currently completing a Bachelor's degree in Communica- tions with a minor in Theater. Gerald is a freelance journalist, author, writer, actor, debater, instruc- tor, and performer. He also serves as the New Program Development Coordinator for the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues (NAUDL), in collaboration with Chicago Public Schools. Gerald also served as an UIC Ambassador through the African American Action Network (AAAN), a member of the Black Student Union, and was inducted into the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. Gerald is committed to bringing his expe- riences with mentoring youth, volunteerism, research and social critiques to bridging gaps between interfaith and diverse communities. Professionally, Dan Kenney is a school teacher. In addition, Dan is involved in community activism. He is currently the co-coordinator of No Private Armies, the co-coordinator of the DeKalb Interfaith Network for Peace and Justice, and the chair of the Social Justice Committee of the Unitarian Univer- salist Fellowship of DeKalb. Asad Jafri facilitated a whole day workshop on ―Art for Social Change‖ for the Philippine Youth Leader- ship Program (PYLP). From 2007 to 2012, Asad Jafri was the Director of Arts and Culture of Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN) in Chicago, Illinois. In 2012, Asad moved to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to serve as the Manager, Marketplace of Creative Arts, World Islamic Economic Forum Foundation. Lisa King is the Associate Director of Deacon Davis CHANCE Program at Northern Illinois University. She is a member of NIU‘s Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with an emphasis in Public Law, and a Master of Science in Education majoring in Counseling from Northern Illinois Univeristy. Lisa does outreach work with the DeKalb community, working with the City of DeKalb and the DeKalb County School District #428.
  13. 13. - 12 - Bashir Martin works with Project Nur in Washington, D.C. Nur is an Arabic word which means ―enlighten- ment‖. Project Nur is the student-led initiative of the American Islamic Congress (AIC). The slogan of AIC is ―passionate about moderation.‖ Of Haitian-Syrian origin, Bashir Martin manages outreach efforts for Project Nur, mobilizing Muslim students at American universities. After graduating from Florida International Univer- sity, he worked on several Boston area campuses in partnership with AmeriCorps to increase student engage- ment in surrounding communities, implementing service-learning and leadership development programs. Pas- sionate about coexistence, Bashir joined the Shalom-Salaam Social Movement, which brings together Jews and Arabs for informal interfaith and inter-ethnic understanding. Social activist Cecile Meyer is a retired social worker who is committed to peace activism. Cele lives in DeKalb, Illinois. Cele grew up in the South and served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. She received her Master's in Social Work from Columbia University and subsequently worked as a family and psychiatric social worker in Atlanta, Chicago, and in Gainesville, FL. After moving to Oak Ridge, Tennessess in 1959, Cele became increasingly involved in the civil rights struggle and was in- strumental in forming the Oak Ridge Federation for Equal Public Services. The group's successes in challenging many of the community's discriminatory policies attracted the attention of the Ku Klux Klan, which had also happened during the family's stay in Gainesville. Cele was employed as a school social worker in DeKalb for 21 years prior to retirement in 1988. She helped organize the DeKalb In- terfaith Network for Peace & Justice in 1986. She is most proud of two arrests at peace demonstrations and being part of a group which sat in at Congressman Hastert's office prior to the Iraq War, until hauled out by the police. During her six vis- its to Nicaragua, Cele got to know a number of self-help groups in that second poorest country in the hemisphere. She helped form the Central American Fund for Human Development, which raises and funnels over $100,000 a year to these projects. Dr. Alison Milofsky is a Senior Program Officer in the Education and Training Center/Domestic at the United States Institue of Peace (USIP). Dr. Milofsky facilitates workshops for educators domestically and internationally to assist them in integrating peace education, particularly social justice principles, into their classrooms. Most recently she has worked with educators from Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia and South Africa. Before joining USIP, Dr. Milofsky was associate direc- tor of the Anti-Defamation League in Washington, D.C., regional office, where she designed and im- plemented anti-bias education programs at the secondary level and trained law enforcement personnel on hate crimes and extremism. Previously, she was a teacher trainer in the Slovak Republic while in the Peace Corps and taught English as a Second Language at the University of Maryland and Georgetown University. Dr. Milofsky holds a B.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. in education policy from the University of Mar- yland. Shakir Mohammed works as the program manager of Project Nur in Washington, D.C. Project Nur is a student-led initiative of the American Islamic Congress (AIC). Dr. Tim Paquette has been a staff member at the Counseling and Student Development Center (CSDC) at Northern Illinois University since 2004 and he has worked exclusively with university students for many years. Dr. Paquette is a licensed clinical psychologist and serves as the Assis- tant Director and Training Director of CSDC. He provides individual and group counseling and is training director of CSDC's APA accredited predoctoral internship program. His areas of exper- tise include multicultural issues, relationship concerns, men's issues, and anxiety concerns. Dr. Paquette‘s professional interests include college student development, diversity educa- tion/training, social justice, and supervision. His counseling orientation is integrative, with an emphasis on interpersonal-process, humanistic, and cognitive perspectives. He obtained his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Purdue University.
  14. 14. - 13 - Rev. Father Primo Racimo is the pastor of St. Margaret of Scotland Episcopal Church in Chicago, Illi- nois. He is actively involved in issues related to social movements, racism, and diversity. Rita Reynolds is a mixed blood Dakota elder, who has followed Native ways, traditions and history for many years. Before retirement, she was faculty advisor to the Native American group at Northern Illinois University and their powwow organizer for twelve years. She coordinates the powwow at Aurora University for four years and helps with their Native American student group, Dream Catchers. She is a member of Midwest Soarring, the Native American Awareness Committee at the Burpee Museum in Rockford, Illinois and the Native American Center in Chicago and helps with their powwows. Rita and her husband, Terry Reynolds, have raised seven children and presently have eleven grand children. She decided to return to school while she was still working, to get a degree so that she could help people in education understand the needs of Native American people. She is presently finishing up her Master‘s degree in Counseling and has been working on a second masters in Higher Education. Shana Dagny Marie Mangharam Siap is a performing artist. While in the Philippines, she starred in many theatrical plays and anchored events like the Sinulog Mardigras, ABS-CBN‘s Children‘s Hour, and Pasko Sa Sugbo. She also directed ―He- len of Troy‖, a play with a cast of 368 children that was brought to the City‘s big stage. She is known as Cebu City‘s official ―Baby‖ Diva and was commissioned to sing for President Gloria Ma- capagal Arroyo. Now in the US, Shana is a registered nurse. Although it is a very different field, she has grown even more adept in the Arts. She is lead vocalist of her band, Soundscraper, and sings for the Chicago Center for Spiritual Living - a group inspired by Michael Beckwith, teacher in The Se- cret. Lakhi Siap is Online Marketing Consultant at Target Media Solutions. He studied at Harper Col- lege. Lakhi lives in Chicago, Illinois and is originally from Cebu City. Currently, he conducts youth workshops and teaches theater with CIRCA PINTIG, a Chicago theater group. He coordinated a major event for the City of Chicago called Passport to the Philippines at the Chicago Children‘s Mu- seum. Lakhi is production manager for various entertainment groups such as Sama- Sama Project Pinoy for the Chicago World Music Festival. He has led workshops in national conferences such as Filipino Americans Coming Together at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Mid-West Association of Filipino Americans at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He works towards promoting cultural awareness in the Asian American community, and encourages them to be involved in the community. Lakhi is creator of Ascene Chicago the first Asian-American online magazine featuring the lat- est happenings in the Asian American communities in the Midwest and the United States. Ellen White teaches at Rochelle Township High School in Illinois. Mrs. White is the Social Studies Chair and the faculty adviser of the International Club. Every year, since PYLP Year One during the academic year 2003-2004, Mrs. White welcomes the Philippine Youth Leadership Program participants to engage in interaction with students, faculty, and staff members of Rochelle High School who are affi- liated with the International Club. Thanks to Mrs. White, both Mr. J. Craven, the superintendent, and Mr. T. McGuire, the school principal, are on board. In recognition of her exemplary work that promotes international education, Mrs. White was inducted as Honorary Member of Phi Beta Delta Zeta Gamma Honor Society for International Scholars at Northern Illinois University.
  15. 15. - 14 - CURRENT PHILIPPINE CONTEXT THE “FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT”: RENEWED HOPE FOR A PATHWAY TO PEACE IN MINDANAO Dr. Susan Russell The historic signing of a ―framework agreement‖ between the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the Philippine government on October 15, 2012 came as a surprise to many people. There had been little news about progress in recent months other than the usual ‗announcements‘ about mutually agreed-upon (but often vague) principles from the respective negotiating panels. Ever since the collapse of the 2008 peace agreement, or the Memorandum of Agreement on Ancestral Domain (MOA_AD), it seemed that both sides could agree on little other than the formation of an International Contact Group to aid Malaysia‘s facilitation of the peace negotiations.1 The details of the behind-the-scenes discussions, obstacles and issues surrounding the signing of the framework agreement are well laid-out in a report published by the International Crisis group on December 5, 2012, titled ―The Philip- pines: Breakthrough in Mindanao‖. 2 The report also carefully reviews the basic elements of the agreement and the plan for moving forward, at least up until President Benigno Aquino III‘s term ends in 2016. Despite highlighting many obstacles still to be overcome or clarified, the report is positive overall and gives due credit both to the MILF leaders‘ flexibility and faith that the Aquino government really did want a settlement, as well as to the Aquino government itself for broadening the consultations with other stakeholders. The authors also note that the framework agreement is ―remarkable for two reasons‖: first, the MILF made a major concession by agreeing to a process of securing the consent of the Moro people to joining the new political entity; and second, the procedures are established to replace the current Autonomous Region of Muslim Min- danao with a new Bangsamoro government before 2016.3 The framework agreement sets out to create a new autonomous regional government called the Bangsamoro, replacing the failed Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. It will be necessary to draft the law to create the region, to be approved by Congress, followed by a plebiscite and MILF-led transition before elections in 2016. Four annexes are to be developed shortly that will expand on many of the details. The first step is the appointment of the Transition Commission. President Aquino signed on December 17 Executive Order (E0) 120 creating the 15-member TransCom that would prepare the groundwork for the setting up of the new autonomous political entity that will replace the Autonomous Region in Mus- lim Mindanao (ARMM) by June 30, 2016. The TransCom would be composed of eight members (including the Chair) se- lected by the MILF and the other seven members will be selected by the government; all members must be Bangsamoro. Once the basic law is completed, the President will authorize it as an urgent bill in Congress. Once ratified, the TransCom will take over the functions of the existing ARMM government, which will be dissolved. The first regular election would be held in 2016. There will also be a third party monitoring team composed of international bodies as well as domestic groups to oversee the implementation of all agreements.4 The core area in which plebiscites will be held to ascertain whether communities wish to join the new Bangsamoro juridical entity is larger than what was originally spelled out in the 2008 MOA-AD. It includes the present area of ARMM, the six municipalities in Lanao del Norte that voted yes in the 2001 plebiscite on the expansion of ARMM, all barangays in the six municipalities in North Cotabato that also voted yes in the same plebiscite, Cotabato City and Isabela City, and all other contiguous areas where there is a local government resolution or a petition of qualified voters requesting their inclu- sion.5 The new Bangsamoro government will have a ministerial form with political parties, according to the framework agreement. This system of government is designed to dismantle or at least weaken the existing traditional powerholding 1 The International Contact Group was set up in 2009 and consists of representatives from the United Kingdom, Japan, Sau- di Arabia, Turkey, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, Conciliation Resources, The Asia Foundation, and Muhamma- diyah (an Indonesian Islamic organization). 2 The report is available on the International Crisis Group website: http://www.crisisgroup.org/~/media/Files/asia/south- east-asia/philippines/240-the-philippines-breakthrough-in-mindanao.pdf. 3 Ibid, p.1. 4 Ibid, p.4. 5 Ibid, p.6.
  16. 16. - 15 - clans in the ARMM. It also enables the MILF leaders and supporters to form a party themselves and compete in the 2016 elections. Forthcoming annexes on power sharing, as well as wealth sharing between the central government and the auto- nomous region will need to clarify the asymmetric nature of the political arrangement. One of the more interesting parts of the framework agreement is the section on ‗normalisation‘. This section touches on three issues of concern: 1) the creation of a civilian police force for the Bangsamoro; 2) the gradual decommis- sioning of MILF forces and programs to help combatants return to normal life; and 3) the gradual handover of law enforce- ment functions from the Philippine military to the new police force.6 As the euphoria over the actual signing of the framework agreement begins to subside, the obstacles to effective implementation and the hurdles ahead are many. Efforts are being made by the Organization of Islamic Conference to bol- ster the reunification process of the MILF with the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF)—efforts that need to succeed. The opposition to the agreement from the breakaway Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Movement (BIFM) in central Mindanao also needs to be dealt with in time. The International Crisis Group outlines four major obstacles to be overcome: including whether the basic law will be compatible with the Constitution; possible opposition from Christians, indigenous peoples and the Sulu archipelago; the potential for an MILF splinter to grow if implementation stalls; and the future of MILF fighters and their weapons.7 While there is still no functioning peace in Mindanao, there is opportunity for optimism. In a report for the U.S. Institute of Peace, Jennifer Keister notes that President Aquino is a popular person with significant political capital at the grassroots level to help build consensus for the agreement and to ward off spoilers.8 Second, she notes the MILF has a more developed group of bureaucrats and administrators than the MNLF had in 1996 and their resources and experience will help in the transition. Third, with the exception of the 2008 violence after the failure of the MOA-AD, the ceasefire between the MILF and the government has been remarkably stable. And finally, civil society itself is more fully engaged with Moro civilians than at any time in the past. They can provide an important source of support for civilians and for the rehabilitation of combatants in the region.9 The international community also has an important role to play in delivering much needed foreign aid to the con- flict-affected areas. If donor states and agencies can work within the boundaries of the framework agreement and with the relevant civil society organizations, such as the Bangsamoro Development Agency and other legitimate organizations, they also can greatly enhance the transition. The key, according to Keister, is for international agencies to avoid fostering com- petition between domestic agencies and local stakeholders.10 Improved coordination and consultation with relevant stake- holders and among aid agencies themselves can help reduce such competition. Some of the graduates of the ACCESS/PYLP program are already taking on significant public leadership roles re- lated to the upcoming transition. It is our fervent belief that all of our student and adult participants over the last eight years are contributing to the sustainability of the transition process through the kinds of community empowerment projects they have introduced and through their articulation of a more compassionate and pluralistic, tolerant vision for Mindanao. We trust they will actively contribute even more to the larger social understanding and dialogue in their various communities about these exciting new developments as they unfold. While there are as many questions that remain to be figured out as there are answers in the peace deal, patience and hard work on the part of the TransCom can begin to fill in the blanks. Surely one issue is how aware and informed local people in far-flung communities are about the actual structure and timeta- ble of the framework agreement. Young people can help get this information out orally or through their peers. That is the kind of leadership we expect from our ACCESS/PYLP alumni. We are all greatly honored here at Northern Illinois Univer- sity to have been part of their journey and we look forward to their future impacts in the region. 6 Ibid, p.10. 7 Ibid, p.13. 8 Jennifer Keister, ―A Diplomatic Milestone for Mindanao?‖. U.S. Institute of Peace Peacebrief 136, November 29, 2012. Can be accessed at http://www.usip.org/publications/diplomatic-milestone-mindanao. 9 Ibid, p.3. 10 Ibid, p.3.
  17. 17. - 16 - PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PHILIPPINE YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM YEAR 8 BUILDING A NEW GENERATION OF CITIZENS AS CATALYSTS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The Philippine Youth Leadership Program (PYLP) Year 9 brought to Northern Illinois University (NIU) 27 youth and adult leaders from the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao and surrounding provinces in the Philippines from April 14 to May 17, 2012. Northern Illinois University (NIU), through its International Training Office (ITO), administered an intensive five-week U.S. exchange program focusing on the themes of civic education, leadership development, respect for diversity, and com- munity activism, and facilitated the cooperative implementation of service projects in Mindanao. PYLP Year 9 provides new knowledge and experience for the participants and prepares them for a lifetime of leadership and community service. ITO‘s new partner institution in the Philippines since April 2010–AFS Intercultural Programs Philippines Foundation, Inc. (AFS IPP) recruited and selected the participants, along with representatives from the U.S. Embassy in Manila. NIU has successfully implemented eight youth leadeershipt programs funded by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State (BECA) to create a new generation of empowered youth leaders from all faiths and ethnic groups in the southern Philippines to contribute toward peace building efforts in Mindanao. PYLP Year 9 was envisioned to (1) advance a dialogue and promote greater mutual understanding and respect between Muslim and non-Muslim youth from the ARMM and surrounding provinces; (2) create, educate, and empower a new gener- ation of young leaders with a strong sense of civic responsibility and commitment to social change and community devel- opment; and (3) promote a better understanding of the United States--its people, culture, values, and civic institutions. The specific objectives of this program are to: (1) unleash the potential of youth to engage and work together as catalysts for positive change in their communities; (2) sharpen participants‘ skills in leadership, civic education, community activism, and respect for diversity; (3) enhance participants‘ appreciation of their similarities and differences through various interac- tive activities that will improve mutual understanding and respect; (4) provide participants with tools for working collabora- tively across ethnic and religious lines for future community projects; (5) develop in the participants an appreciation and understanding of the cultural, gender, ethnic, and religious diversity of America; (6) provide them ample opportunities for interaction with their American peers and opportunities to volunteer in community service programs in DeKalb and subur- ban Chicago that will provide experience in civic participation. The following outcomes are envisioned: (1) the foundation will be laid for an expanded and committed generation of youth leaders and activists who will initiate sustainable social changes in the ARMM and surrounding provinces; (2) increased knowledge and skills in leadership, civic responsibility, community activism, and respect for diversity; (3) appreciation of the value of community service as evidenced by increased levels of participation in volunteer work; (4) deeper understand- ing of the causes of inter-religious and inter-ethnic conflicts in Mindanao; (5) better appreciation of similarities and differ- ences between U.S. and Philippine cultures; (6) new knowledge and skills in action plan development and coalition- building; (7) established networking and collaboration among alumni in developing and implementing community service projects and the modeling of positive cooperation among ethnic, religious, and socio-economic groups; and (8) enhanced understanding of Asian cultures among NIU faculty, staff, and students. The 20-month project (July 2011 - February 2013) includes four phases: (1) A four-day Pre-departure Orientation. (2) Five- week U.S.-based Exchange Program on responsible citizenship, community activism, leadership development, respect for diversity, and action plan development. (3) Implementation of community service projects in Mindanao. The Project pro- vides mini-grants for the community projects designed by the participants. (4) Follow-on Program for the alumni to rein- force values and skills learned during the exchange program at NIU and present a progress report on their community project. Project Director: Dr. Susan Russell Administrative Director: Dr. Lina Davide Ong
  18. 18. - 17 - Program Coordinator: Leslie Shive Training Coordinator: Dr. Rey Ty Full-Time Training Assistant: Srie Ramli Part-Time Training Assistants: Hala Hweio & Saima Newaz-Karim Intern: Maria Ahmad Partner Organization in the Philippines: AFS Intercultural Programs Philippines Foundation, Inc. (AFS IPP) Theme Action Activity Leadership Development Workshops & Activities Developing Action Plans for Community Project (Dr. Rey Ty) Theater as a Medium for Social Action (Shana & Lakhi Siap) Stronghold Leadership Camp Effective Communication for Community Organizing (Chris Birks) Social Media for Social Good (Chris Birks) Youth Leadership & Civic Engagement (Reema Ahmad) Presentation of Action Plans Town Hall Meeting Leaders of the Day Roles of Adult Leaders Civic Responsibility and Community Activism Workshops & Discussions Orientation to Community Service (Dr. Rey Ty) Practical skills for transforming civil society: Integrating Faith, Diversity, & Social Action (Gerald Hankerson) Developing a community service project & action planning Sharing of experiences in community engagement (Adult leaders) Adult-youth dialogue on engagement for social change Civic action, social justice, & human rights (Project Nur, D.C.) Youth in Peacebuilding (Institute of Peace) Community Service & Vo- lunteerism Community service in Russell Woods Feed My Starving Children Oak Crest Retirement Ctr. Chicago Cares volunteer organization Respect for Diversity and Mutual Understanding Workshops & Discussions The Quest for Justice, Identity & Peace in Mindanao (Dr. Susan Russell) Diversity & conflict management (Dr. Tim Paquette) Youth and Peacebuilding (U.S. Institute of Peace) Understanding American Culture Homestay 2 students per American home Homestay Orientation (Dr. Lina Ong & Dr. Rey Ty) Host Family Orientation (Leslie Shive, Dr. Susan Russell, Dr. Lina Ong & Dr. Rey Ty) Weekend: Spend precious time with their American families. Workshops NIU Police ―Meet and Greet‖ Intercultural Orientation (Dr. Rey Ty) U.S. Geography (Dr. Rey Ty) Defining & celebrating our similarities & differences (Dr. Janice Hamlet) ―Shadow of Hate‖ and ―A Place at the Table‖ (Dr. Janice Hamlet) Native American Spirituality (Rita & Terry Reynolds) Cultural and Historical Visits Religious Diversity o Attend Mass at Newman Catholic Church o Visits & discussions: DeKalb Mosque, Baha‘i Temple, Buddhist Temple, & Rockford Mosque o Tour of Holocaust Museum Chicago o United Center o Willis Tower
  19. 19. - 18 - o Millennium Park o Architecture Cruise o Navy Pier Northern Illinois Region o Pres. Reagan‘s Home in Dixon, IL o Keeling-Puri Peace Plaza Cultural/Historical Tours - Washington, D.C. o U.S. Capitol o U.S. Congress o Lincoln & Jefferson Memorials o World War II, Vietnam, Korean, Iwo Jima Memorials o Arlington Cemetery > Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers o Smithsonian Museums o U.S. Institute of Peace o U.S. Department of State o Hairspray Dinner-Theater Interaction with American Peers Rochelle High School Students (Mrs. Ellen White, Principal Mr. Travis Mc- Guire & Superintendent Mr. Jamie Craven) DeKalb 4-H Club Members Students in ASPIRA Inc. Youth Development Center In addition to the program activities listed in the above table, the participants submitted a daily online journal, carried out duties of the ―leaders of the day,‖ and conducted group meetings. The adult leaders had weekly meetings with the PYLP – ITO program team. The table below shows the overall theme rating in details. PYLP PARTICIPANT RATINGS OF LEARNING BY THEME 5. To what extent has the program enhanced your knowledge, skills, and attitudes on the following aspects? Very High High Moderate Low Very Low Rating Average Response Count Provide high quality leader- ship development 66.7% (16) 33.3% (8) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.33 24 Empower young leaders with a strong sense of civic re- sponsibility and commitment to community development & social change 87.5% (21) 12.5% (3) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.13 24 Provide participants with tools for working collabora- tively across ethnic and reli- gious lines for future com- munity projects 79.2% (19) 20.8% (5) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.21 24 Promote a better understand- ing of the United States--its people, culture, values, and civic institutions 70.8% (17) 29.2% (7) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.29 24 answered question 24 skipped question 1
  20. 20. - 19 - PYLP PARTICIPANT RATINGS OF THE HOMESTAY EXPERIENCE 12. Please rate the Homestay experience. Very High High Moderate Low Very Low Rating Average Response Count The home stay orientation adequately prepared me for the Homestay. 63.6% (14) 36.4% (8) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.36 22 I felt welcome in my Homestay. 86.4% (19) 13.6% (3) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 1.14 22 I was able to spend quality time with my host family. 54.5% (12) 31.8% (7) 9.1% (2) 4.5% (1) 0.0% (0) 22 I was able to communicate my needs to my host family. 72.7% (16) 22.7% (5) 4.5% (1) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 22 My Homestay was a valuable expe- rience. 95.5% (21) 4.5% (1) 0.0% (0 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 22 answered question 26 skipped question 0 HOST FAMILIES The host family team consisted of twelve families. Two homes hosted the 4 adult leaders and ten hosted the 22 student participants. There was only one new host family and 11 veteran host families. Recruitment was via a personal letter sent to all previous host families involved in PYLP programs and an e-mail to those families that had expressed inter- est in hosting. In seven of the homes that hosted the youth, there was at least one teen-aged member of the host family. As part of the application process, adults 18 years and older in the host family gave permission for a criminal background check to be conducted. AccuSource, Inc. was used to perform the screening. This vendor is the company used by Northern Illi- nois University‘s Human Resource department for its background screening. Being able to use this already established partnership made the process efficient and acceptable to the time frame. The host family orientation was held in the Holmes Student Center and was attended by at least one member of each family. Families received copies of the calendar of the program, a home stay handbook, and their foster ―children‘s‖ profiles. The opportunity for families to meet their foster children was provided at the end of the orientation. About half of the students came to this brief time of meet and greet. Activities during the homestay included attending concerts at Northern IL University, attending the DeKalb High School musical production, bowling, birthday celebrations of family members and participants, ―eating out‖ at local restau- rants, and participating in worship services with family members. Several family members joined the PYLP participants at the Saturday 4-H interaction including the service project, team building activities, and dairy farm tour. Some also joined to serve at Feed My Starving Children and to shop at Fox Valley Mall. All families attended the Host Family Farewell and Thank You event, to support their participants and witness their final theater project and cultural presentations. Host family feedback was overwhelmingly positive with the usual complaint of not having enough time with the partici- pants. All indicated that they desire to serve in the capacity of host family for the next Philippine Youth Leadership Pro- gram.
  21. 21. - 20 - In general, participants reported a high level of satisfaction with classroom sessions, field visits, and logistics. The following quotations of the anonymous final evaluation survey reiterate their positive experiences:  They can promote a positive peace in mindanao and they help others to train and to become a good leader and a good follower.  The program is very life-changing.  The staff of the program have the knowledge and skills which served as the main success of the Program.  The program has a holistic approach in training the youth. There are classroom sessions with informative speakers, but more importantly there are experiencial learnings which put what abstract concepts we learned and turning them into concrete realities. It is also not only a leadership training per se, but also an intercultural and intergenerational engagement between different cultures and nationalities.  The strength of the program would be the way learning from workshops and sessions are connected to what can we do to solve the problems in the community. We learn at the same time we had fun. The way they balance the learning and the enjoyment. The way they let us go out of the classrooms and apply what we have learned inside the four cornered room.  1.) Well planned and organized program. 2.) Committed volunteers.  - the support of the US Department - skilled facilitators - informative tours – good accommodation - informa- tive sessions  Connect people of different ethnicities, religion, and status in life. Made participants realized their personal lapses, prejudices/biases, stereotypes against other people and let them move forward with a smile.  The facilitators are very friendly to the participants and treat them family. The facilities are provided. They choose best speaker in every sessions.  They know the lessons we need to know importantly. They also know how to change the weak things we have in us.  the strength of the program was that everything was then organized interms of preparation in sessions, activities and tours.  Each speaker of our workshops really explained the specific topics which I was able to learn a lot from and would probably use it to become an effective leader and implementing my community project. The program staff as well was very supportive to us which strengthened us that we can do more of what we knew to our- selves.  The aspiring participants because if there is none, the program will be gone.  Strengths of the program include: - knowledgeable and highly-competent staff/personnel - well-designed pro- gram - high-impact speakers/workshops/sessions  In my opinion, here are the strengths of the Program 1. It is a comprehensive and organized structure that inte- grate culture, leadership and civic engagement 2. Workshops are appropriate in developing the skills of the participant 3. It promotes experiential learning, in which we learn the lesson as we are doing it.  1. Competent and FUN ITO Staff 2. Organized, Powerful and Meaningful Curriculum 3. Effective and Influen- tial Speakers  The staff, resources, connections.  (1)Speakers invited were experts on their subjects discussed. (2)Facilitators performed their respective roles during the training. (3)NIU-ITO has access to variuos organizations working for the community and people who have been performing in the field for the people and community development. (4) Activities are custom- fitted to the needs of the young people.  The strength of the program is the ITO Staffs because they were able to really teach us how to be a better and responsible leader and they really exerted their efforts just to make the program effective and knowledgeable.  participants sponsors or funds facilitators  The alertness and the approach of each volunteers and staffs  *the intensive workshops and experiential learning, the tours to the historical landmarks and the homestay wherein the participants were able to experience even for a while the life of an American family.
  22. 22. - 21 - ACTION PLANS Each participant developed an achievable and practical action plan that was related to the program objectives. Names Action Plan Project Title Type of Project 1. Abdurajak, Al-Fraz Khan Do Clean Go Green Environment 2. Ali, Samir Jr. Clean-up for a Beautiful Change Environment 3. Ang, Alyssa Marie A Goal for New Hope: Social Inclusion of the Abused through Sports Sports 4. Angin, Akimah Keep Your Surroundings Safe & Clean Project Environment 5. Barredo, Criseline PENMANSHIP: Peace Environment Management for Ste- wardship Environment 6. Belen, Alexis Lahing Pinoy, Larong Pinoy (Filipino Games for Filipino Youth) Sports 7. Cabuyoc, Orland Pagmulat sa Pagsulat at Pag-asa sa Pagbasa (Consciousness Raising through Writing & Hope through Reading) Literacy 8. Candido, Arwald Art Works: an Art that Works! (Visual Arts Workshop) Art 9. Dail, Morena Green Mountain: Peace Mountain: ―Peace and Environment in Our Hands‖ (A Tree Planting and Clean-up Operation) Environment 10. Dela Cruz, John Xyrious ―Out of School is not Out of Learning‖ Literacy 11. Galvez, Judean Grace MANI: Magsisimula Ang Negosyo sa Inyo Income Generation 12. Gonzales, Rena Jean Food Treats for Reach Feeding 13. Lao, Aquisah-Rohaimah 14. Lukman, Fazniyara Guiwan Anti-Dengue Drive Health Advocacy 15. Macarao, Sohaya You and I Together for the Cleanliness of Lanao People‘s Park Environment 16. Magno, Dorothy Ena Adopt a Tree Program Environment 17. Mala, Hassan Shanne Plant a TREE, ―A Legacy to the future Generation‖ Environment 18. Malida, Joven Ryan ―Sagwas ato, Flehew ato‖ (Let‘s play, Let‘s have fun) Sports 19. Mastura, Cedrick Adopt-a-Watershed and Tree Growing Activity Environment 20. Navarro, Maria Joanna H.E.A.L.T.H. Project (Human Empowerment: Active Lea- dership Towards Health): Health Education Campaign Advocacy 21. Pacis, Christine Louise Mangrove Planting: Uniting the Community Environment 22. Pancho, Cindy 3R‘s Livelihood Income Generation 23. Pasawilan, Al Qadir ―IndaKabataan‖-Hip Hop Dance Competition and Work- shop Sports (Dance) 24. Romero, Rafael Jr. Indigenous Studenets‘ Community Gathering, Clean-up drive and Communal Lunch Advocacy & Envi- ronment 25. Sumagaysay, Nikki Lyn Trees for Tomorrow: A Tree Planting Activity and Envi- ronmental Awareness Seminar Environment 26. Tito, Bai Jeanine Building Peace through Sportsfest Sports PROGRAM MONITORING AND EVALUATION The program was evaluated on a regular basis both in formal and informal settings, namely: (1) informal daily feed- back, (2) formal regular evaluations, and (3) critical essays reflecting the program impact. First, there were weekly meetings with the adult leaders and the Program Team. Continuous feedback evaluation were conducted by the Project Director and the Administrative Director to (a) determine the extent to which the objectives were being met, (b) estimate the effectiveness of weekly activities, (c) determine whether the training needs and participants‘ expectations were being met, and (d) find out if the logistical arrangements and the training environments were comfortable for the participants. Informal feedback eval- uation was carried out daily using group and individual discussions. Two formal evaluations were conducted, utilizing instruments designed specifically to measure (1) participants‘ learn- ing, (2) their level of satisfaction with their educational experiences, (3) personal impact of the program on individual partic- ipants, and (4) social impact of their proposed project plans. To assess structural program strengths and weaknesses, learn- ing outcomes, and program impact, we conducted separate evaluations carried out (1) at the end of the NIU five-week pro- gram and (2) on the last day of the follow on seminar.
  23. 23. - 22 - CHAPTER 1: CRITICAL REFLECTION BELOVED MINDANAO TO WHOM I BELONG: UNTO HIM I SHALL SERVE AND RETURN. ABDURAJAK, AL-FRAZKHAN PANDAO Journey to the Unknown World Some great thinkers said, you can't be able to know and discover something great about certain things unless you explore and indulge yourself. Openness and will to take the risk is good attributes of learning. Journey to the unknown world in search for knowledge is as much as the same way back home. Although it may vary in terms of level, degree, con- text of what learning does it gives. The experienced of coming to the United States courtesy of US department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and Northern Illinois University International Training Office serves as an empowering ground for potential adult and youth leaders from different places in Mindanao by enhancing their skills as to understand how and why conflict emerged and let them personally explore and realized how to positively yet proactively respond , plan and make necessary and specific action towards a specific societal problems. As we were toured around in several american - historical places and landmarks it makes me feel as if I'm just hal- lucinating for in my mind its almost impossible to have such progress and development the United States had as Manifested by its massive and Well Organized And advance Society despite its darkest History. elusive dreams as I thought but they (Americans) had made it. What have they done? Why do America becomes one of the worlds top most influential and rich country? How do they do it? Could it be possible that it can also happen in my home country? If it can, what shall be the skills and learnings that I must have to do the same? But as I personally observed and experienced life in america for thirty days, those were product of United States American historical Struggle and Glorious past. By organizing themselves and for trying to empower their fellow Americans were the best recipes that bind and united the Americans through the decades. On the other hand factors like American empowerment through participatory Governance, responsive community service, volunteerism, Social Ownership and Co - owning of Social Problems and the likes were elements that gradually put United States of America to where it is nowadays. Impossible? But made possible.... Not impossible for Mindanao. Big Break to Make a Difference This is what I wanted to do when I get back to my country; I do wanted to write the journey and the experiences that I had for thirty five days in the United States of America particularly our my experience at Northern Illinois University and in Washington DC and share it as form of my personal life story on my journey in search for empowerment to empower. To share the day today personal observations as well as lessons learned from the Pilipino Youth Leadership Programs and activities the likes of Tours and trips to several American Socio-Cultural, Political, religious Historical Landmarks that played a major role for the evolution of greater American Nation. There's No Place Like Home There's no place like home and there's no such thing as doing and serving your community that best makes home an ideal place for everyone. With the experience learnings brought to me by PYLP program, it motivated me more to indulge Participate and involve myself in Various Local Social Organizations in our province and do my share by imparting good stories grounded from inspiring PYLP experiences. One thing that I will be doing Is Integrate my proposed community Clean up drive Project "Do Clean Go Green Clean Up Drive‖ to Sulu Philippine National Police Community-Based project where I'm working with. It will be satisfying for it will sustained and widen the programs scope. I will start to organize a group of possible volunteers from fellow law enforcement officers, friends and people from the community I live with who had the same interest and love of providing helping hands to indigent people that are in urgent need. I'm also planning to ask permission and lobby for approval of our Police Community Relations Chief to integrate and adapt some of the Social and Peace building activities and games I've learned in the US ( like Chicago Cares Clay mak- ing and painting for the kids, Strongholds Tream building Games and plays) for our community and School visitation pro- grams/activities that our office is undertaking as part of our extended police-community service given twice a month. I strongly believed it can even make the programs flow more participatory and enjoyable specially for our community part- ners. SPREAD THE WORD.
  24. 24. - 23 - CAUSE AND SOLUTION ALI, SAMIR PANGCATAN JR Mindanao Situation When we left mindanao, we left it with love but the people are still fighting for their land and for what they think they are right and the others are wrong. When I was still in mindanao there's already a conflict between different religions, tribes, ethnics, leaders, and different groups. They are they are fighting because they want to defend their selves from other and they also want to get power in the land. For the religions they want to defend their selves through other religions be- cause of discriminations. Tribes are also fighting because of the tribe wars and they want to save their selves. For the ethnic- ities, they always want to defend their selves because of discriminations of other ethnicities. and for the Leaders, they all want to claim the motherland because of their personal interest. They kill their enemies in that land and they are also fight- ing for the power in the land and we citizens doesn't know who to choose for the position. Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the Philippine Army are the two main groups who are fighting in Mindanao now because of misunderstanding. They don't know that they have 1 goal for Mindanao and that is to acquire true peace in Mindanao. Conflict is the best word to describe the situation in Mindanao because of these conflict I have mentioned. New Learnings Knowledge. There are a lot of new knowledge I learned while I'm staying here at United States. I learned more about different religions, about the Americans, about United States, and about the stories of participants. What I learned about the different religions is that there ares some similarities between their religion and my religions. In Islam and Chris- tianity, they both have God, they both have a place to Worship, they both have special days in praying, they both have lead- ers, and they both have a prayer call. About the Americans, they always want to have a salad in their meals and they can eat raw vegetable. They just use fork and knife in when they eat their meal. They are clean in their surroundings even in their personal hygiene and they are frank or straight motivated. About United States, there are 50 states here in United States and the 23rd state is Illinois. United States had 45 presidents. And about the participants, they have different stories, different way of life, different religions, different tribes, and different characters. Some are happy-go-lucky and some are silent and straight to the point. But we are all involved in the Situation of Mindanao. Skills. I learned a lot in my stay here in host family and in HSC. I got some techniques on how to solve certain problems, I learn to participate well in every activity and giving out the best. I learn how to make concrete proposal and I knew how hard to make a action plan. Abilities. Not only knowledge and skill I learned in my stay here in United States but I also learned new abilities by myself and the help of other help people. I became Responsible, Honest, Participative, Brave, and Writing Journals and Essay. I became responsible since the time we arrived here in United States because I have to live here without the help of my family in Philippines. I became more honest than before because I have to tell the truth because I'm a Leader. What Will I do when I go back to my Community? Implementing the Decided Plan. When I go back to my community in Philippines, I will implement a training of Self-Discipline and Self-Defense through Karate. It will be a two days training and there are 30 participants and their are 12- 18 years old. Because it is a 2 days training I will divide it into two time. for the 2 mornings it will be the training of the 12- 15 years old and their training time is 9:00am up to 12:00nn. Then for the afternoon are for the 16-18 years old and their training time is 1:00pm up to 3:00pm.
  25. 25. - 24 - THE VOICE OF A YOUNG MINDANAOAN ANG, ALYSSA MARIE C. I. IRONY IN CONFLICTS Mindanao is the second largest island in the Philippines. It is known for its vast landscapes, its mountainous ram- parts, and its opulent diversity. It is also one of the Philippines‘ main suppliers for natural resources because of the pre- served heritage of its culture, which reflects its prominence in the cultivation of its crops. Even with this wealth, the so-called ―Land of Promise‖ has not been a land of glory at all. The unresolved conflicts in this island have made a chain reaction of destruction among every aspect in the society. There are so many unimaginable reasons for the conflicts that just sprout out of the bloom. But what really are the conflicts that are obvious even to the eyes of a youth like me? What is the real situation of Mindanao? i. RELIGIOUS DISPARITY This is the most common cause of the conflict in Mindanao. Since Mindanao is the melting pot of the Philippines‘ religion, the different views and opinions of the inhabitants are very hard to settle because of prejudice and ethnocentrism. ii. CUSTOM CONTRADICTIONS Because of Mindanao‘s diversity, there are many tribal traditions that are still preserved, and these traditions are often unacceptable to the society today. This is the reason why people often misjudge others. They think that their customs and traditions are the right ones to follow. iii. GOVERNMENT ABUSE The government tolerates what is happening throughout the years and this is one of the things that cause the never –ending conflicts in Mindanao. The government leaders are more interested in grabbing power, money, and fame rather than making better changes in their certain areas. These are the obvious things that destroy the image of Mindanao today, which is another trigger to more and more problems that have surfaced. It created another chain reaction of dilemmas that have affected much of the Mindanaoans. II. EDIFYING JOURNEY In our journey to change these things, we, the youth should be the ones to act upon all of these issues. We should use our knowledge to do and plan things that will slowly transform these circumstances into programs that everyone would want. Here in the Philippine Youth Leadership Program, every day has been a learning experience for me. Even the tours and the small sharing sessions have become my references on widening my skills of being a leader in the society and a bet- ter citizen of the country. i. ACQUIRING KNOWLEDGE Being here for a purpose, the main things we need to do are to share things we know and acquire new knowledge from others. Knowledge is very important because it becomes the basis for everything, for it is the source of plans and strategies. But although this is very important, it shouldn‘t control us because it is more effective to be a well-rounded lead- er then to be a smart planner. ii. BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS Our partners play a big role in our projects. They ARE the project. They could be the critiques; or they could be the working force that would help you to instigate your project and even determine its success. But even though they play such a big role, we should always make sure that the partnerships we build are good ones, so that it just wouldn‘t be a waste of time and money. iii. ACCEPTANCE Being here is learning acceptance experientially. I have opened my mind to a whole lot of things and perspec- tives. I have been exposed to the Western culture, which is greatly different from ours, and valued it. I have learned to ACCEPT. These are the things that I‘ve learned in my stay here in the United States. This might not be a detailed note taking of my learning journey, but these are the general or the most highlighted parts in this wonderful part of our lives. Now we can truly apply all of these new information and skills as youth leaders in being catalysts for social change. But given this big role, what concrete actions will I do to help others with all the skills and attitudes that I have learned here?
  26. 26. - 25 - III. APPLYING THE KNOWLEDGE As youth leaders and catalysts for social change, we should always remember that we can do anything we want, as long as it‘s good for everyone, it‘s doable, and realistic so that we wouldn‘t just keep on promising to people and break their hopes. i. EDUCATION Connected with what I‘ve learned, I will use my education to teach others and provide them opportunities to learn. I will implement programs that provide basic education for the poor and the out of school youths. ii. ENVIRONMENTAL CARE Being catalysts for change, we should not only care for the people but to the environment as well because without it our efforts will be worthless. The environment is our stage. This is where everything in the world happens; and if it will be destroyed, then the change we want will be impossible to fulfill. With that said, I would implement projects on tree plant- ing, coastal clean up, and road cleaning. This would slowly but surely help our abused environment. iii. PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND ARTS Here in the Philippines, we have many delinquents. These delinquents are grabbed of many chances to learn and change. As a leader, I will try to inject sports and arts to help everyone, especially the delinquents. We should always re- member that all of us should have an equal chance to do and explore things. That is why sports and the arts are great ave- nues to empower the delinquent youths. Through this, we will be giving them an outlet that will not only be good for their physical health, but also for the society‘s health. Now, having shared about our situation here in Mindanao, our experience here as a leader in training, and our ideas for social action, I firmly stand and speak out on behalf of all the youth in Mindanao. First, to all the youth out there, we should not be afraid to speak up and fight for what is right because we are the future of our broken homeland. Second, we should unite and strive for our long advocated peace so that good things will be the only ones passed on to our children. Lastly, we should always remember that we have no power to stop these conflicts now, but if we believe and trust in each and everyone‘s inner-leader, then tomorrow will be brighter for all of us. START THE CHANGE IN MINDANAO, TODAY ANGIN, AKIMAH H. U. WHO IS MINDANAO? Mindanao, the land of promise, the land of overflowing natural resources and rich culture, the land of the peace talks and wars, kidnappings bombings and terrorism, my land, my home, my own. The search for peace is going, still going but until when?? Who should take action? The government?? The elders?? or The leaders?? No, the new generation should take control. The generation will be the change, the generation is the change, and the new generation is PEACE. These misconceptions about Mindanao could be change, it could be, if we show to all what is really happening in Mindanao. That Mindanao is not a war place or something Mindanao has its own peace and today each city is struggling to have their own peace back. Establishing a good communication to other parts of the Philippines to avoid misconception or misunderstanding of Mindanao‘s situation today is the answer. Let others know they‘re wrong, some cities have already had their peace and prosperity back, it‘s just that others are not. Not all but some have already won their peace back. Somehow it is in the process. Peace is in process. It will continue to go but it will stop if nobody will start doing peace. Peace should come from all the Minadaoans, all should join hands to accomplish this ONE GREAT GOAL they keep on fighting for way back many many years ago. WHAT ARE THE ACTIONS TAKEN?? The government have consecutively arranged peace talks to solve this issue. Even the other international groups from Indonesia, Japan, and Britain also tried to help. Leaders like Dr. Nur Misuari of the MNLF(Moro National Liberation Front) and Murad Ibrahim of MILF(Moro Islamic Liberation Front) have participated in this peace talks. Japan also had their part in one peace talks. Indeed there have been so many peace talks happening today in Mindanao but its effect is not yet felt. Some issues are they do peace talks secretly, so that no one will know. But government peace talks and any other peace talks should always be in public, so that everyone is aware of what really is happening in their land. How can you solve something and communicate to others if you do it secretly?? You should whatever you want them to know and at the same time listen to everybody‘s comment. You would know not just one situation or problems in Mindanao but many, you
  27. 27. - 26 - could explain your goal to not just one person in Mindanao but to many, you will know many other people whom you share your goal with. In this way we could unite as one, think of a plan as one and could do it together. Anything could be achieved if everybody will do their part for this change. A friendly organization of representatives of all religious groups in Mindanao could be an example. This will serve as an eye opener of all the sides in each conflict and could make a friendly bond between different religions. It should be just a talk, friendship will be better. Just like our school, it is a public SCIENCE HIGH SCHOOL with both Muslim and Christian students, we have clubs and organizations that help us interact with each other, this way we, the muslim students, know things we didn‘t know from the Christian students. We usually have small talks or chitchat about the differences and more the similarities of our faith during some activities in school. START THE CHANGE, DO IT Perhaps, these things are useless if the people is not doing anything. The youth is now starting to be aware of what‘s happening around them. Organizations for peace were starting to assemble in different places in Mindanao. For ex- ample in my city Marawi, a PEACE CLUB were established in our University. The MINDANAO STATE UNIVERSITY PEACE club, they organize seminars and celebrates a week of peace in which they invite Christian Armies and Muslim stu- dents or some Christian students in the campus to celebrate peace with each other and to have a stronger bong with the two different religion. Another one is that Mindanao women from Davao have said that they will start to participate actively in these peace talks since they are also much affected by these conflicts. I could say that the Mindanaoans are now starting to wake up and do something for change and to achieve this much awaited peace in their land. Yes, The youth and the people were now becoming aware of what‘s happening around them, but awareness is not enough. Someone must take a stand, must have the initiative to have a change, and must be the start. For example big prob- lems like pollution, corruption, health problems, anyone can have a start of changing it like starting to throw garbage at the trash can, start segregating it and recycle. In the problem of corruption, start by being thrifty, start being honest and trust- worthy. Then for health problems, you can start being healthy, then encourage your friends. Big things start from small be- ginnings, so a big change should start from simply you. MINDANAO, MY LAND, ARISE, YOU DESERVE TO BE FREE If only Mindanaoans will learn to understand each other and instead work on cultivating its land let Mindanao bloom on its own. If only UNITY, RESPECT, and LOVE will live in all of us, PEACE is possible. Unity, let us do changes together. ―NO MAN IS AN ISLAND‖, we can do anything possible. RESPECT, let us respect each other‘s difference and appreciate our similarities. Mindanaoans have something in common, their one GREAT LOVE for Mindanao, let us us this love for mindano as a strong bond to move and make changes for peace. The change will come from all of us. No one could help us if we don‘t help ourselves. Let us all unite to achieve these one great goal. We should let Mindanao be free and let PEACE be back to her today. MINDANAO: NOW AND TOMORROW BARREDO, CRISELINE Deal in Mindanao Mindanao being the second largest Philippines Island is the only area in the country with a significant Muslim presence. Now, the conflict has risen to acts of violence, including a recent bombing of a Christian area of Mindanao. The conflict is often framed as a religious one; Muslims versus Christians. This is not really a Muslim problem, as time has passed the fact that there is a religious difference has become apparent. Religion discriminations are excessive. Both parties doesn‘t get the points of each other, extremely, it is worsen! Now that we have finally discover a bitter struggle for peace, never ending bombings, killings, kidnappings and the terrorism in the war-torn Mindanao. The current fortified conflict in Mindanao actually reflects the chronic call for the ful- fillment of the right to self-determination of the entire population in the Philippines in order to obtain sustainable peace. Looking for a Relief Now that are eyes were widely opened to the situation in Mindanao, we have come together, we have raise aware- ness within our own selves. After getting to know and learn about each other… such learning‘s were gain during the entire
  28. 28. - 27 - program that we do have. Being responsible is one of the most important things that I think I have learned too much from my stay at NIU. Such attitude is vital and essential as I do perform my duties for the betterment of Mindanao. Having the knowledge of promoting equity, justice and peace will head us towards a greater chance of leading the generation of today and tomorrow and so, having skills and talents that were improved upon engaging ourselves to interac- tive sessions could also lead us to a better for understanding, appreciation and respect towards the way of living of anybody else. Mindanao needs ONE Upon returning to my own island I would probably be proud of myself, thinking that I could bring a great change for a productive Mindanao. Our island needs just ONE thing on how we could bring back the lost glory of it. Mindanao, do only need a good and no lasting mutual understanding between its people of different faith, beliefs and traditions. Bringing the different people into a project that will surely create a change in the society. Providing an avenue for great respect and understanding helps us promote peace within ourselves and with other people whom we believe would have peace in their hearts and souls too. It is simply creating a big change from just bringing people to learn from each other, work together, and by simply thinking that our life is the extension of each other‘s life. Land of Promises, not the Land of Guns and Terror. Let's haul down the curtain and gloom - the sinister shroud we hand unwittingly drawn over the bright banner of Mindanao, an island who has its beauty and a people determined to make life worth living, giving the dreadful situation, because if we wouldn't- who would? + A QUEST FOR CULTURE PRESERVATION BELEN, ALEXIS E. I. Problem Discovered Davao City is an urban city in which they use high technologies. It is developing therefore it utilizes technologies such as computers, laptop, tab, eBook, iPad, iTouch and more. Since most youth nowadays are more oriented by these vices, Phi- lippine Culture is dying out. I could say that the youth is disturbed by this problem. The unfortunate youth does not have time for their family because they need to work. They tend to find jobs and sacrifice for the sake of living. Even the fortu- nate ones are bothered, they use the computers and other vices most of time; more time for that than his/her own family. There are also some cases that the youth tends to steal things so they can survive and there are also cases that conflicts be- tween different religion happens because of ownership in such things. Because of urbanization, Philippine Culture is close to extinction. II. New Learning Since the problem has already been discovered, it‘s time to think about it. For the past two weeks, there were a lot to learn about. This comes in different aspects such as in Attitude, Skills and Knowledge. All the seminars, workshops and even my experiences here at NIU truly struck me with new learning. Also, the moments with other participants greatly af- fects the learning I earned. The training here at NIU really helped me a lot in building myself for a better catalyst of change. It started off with the action plan. I have learned the systematic and detailed way of making an action plan. Every section in that action plan helps in making the project SMART. Next thing I learned is how to deal with different kinds of people; whether young or old, Muslim or Christian and even Americans or other nationalities. It teaches me how to adjust myself to the variety of people. Theatre and Hip Hop used for social change also moved my mind; I have already knew about Dance for Peace or Act for Peace but here at NIU, I have learned the deeper meaning of such. It is not only acting or dancing for PEACE; it is not for the title PEACE but rather it is doing peace without having the title PEACE. It is in the state of having no idea that you‘re doing peace but in the state of action, it talks about peace. There are three things that I could point out for life learning and those are Brainstorming, Budgeting and Time Management. First is brainstorming; throughout this program, we really need to think a lot, we need to state our points and give out our best in terms of ideas. Next is Budgeting; we were given allowance every week and we need to budget that for food, laundry and other necessities. Lastly is time management; this skill was difficult to develop because I am not used to American Time and I need to cope up with it. Most of my days, I didn‘t get enough sleep but eventually, I learned how to manage my time for me to get enough sleep.
  29. 29. - 28 - III. Community Project As a young child growing up in the Philippines, I remember a lot of interaction with peers, friends, relatives, and just other people in general. And one of those ways of interacting, or form of socializing, was through games--and in par- ticular, traditional Filipino games. As time goes by, gone were the familiar faces and the familiar ways of the Filipino. Gone were the friends, cousins, and relatives. Gone were the birthday fiestas. Gone were the play-filled afternoons. Gone were the socializing and interaction. Gone was the sun. Gone was the Philippines. And now we look at Davao City as an urban place in which the city now goes with the high technologies therefore people tend to use such technologies and forget about the culture in which shows the true identity of the Filipinos. Because of the urbanization of Davao City, youth are the ones who are greatly affected. For the fortunate ones, they tend to use technologies than spending their time with their families and for the unfortunate ones; they tend to work than being with their families. The family relationship is poor. Lahing Pinoy, Larong Pinoy is a one day activity that deals mainly for Cultural Preservation, Peace Promotion and Family Relationship Development. In that one day duration, there would be different kinds of Pinoy games like Sipa, Patintero, Piko, Luksong Baka, Siato, Tumbang Preso, Paluan ng Palayok, Luksong Sako, Sungka at Takyan. These games would either be played as a family, by pair or individual; therefore through these games, family bonding could be streng- thened, religious boundaries could be lessen and in a way, Philippine culture could be preserved. These games could also empower the Filipinos especially the youth. There would also be a talk about ―Filipino Identity and Philippine Culture‖, ―Understanding Mindanao‖ and ―Family Planning‖; these three talks are related to the three main purpose of this project. This project also integrates the 3 themes of PYLP which are ―Inter-Faith‖ (Muslim, Christian participants and volunteers); ―Inter-Generational‖ (Youth and Adult participants and Volunteers); and ―Inter-Ethnic‖ (Christianity, Badjao, etc. participants and volunteers). There would be 15 families as participants, 25 to 30 volunteers and 3 resource speakers. TRANSFORMATION OF NEW MINDANAO CABUYOC, ORLAND C. The Conflict Mindanao is also known as the Land of Promise and the food basket in the Philippines. It is the second larg- est island and the only area which is Muslim is more dominant into other culture and religion. The name Mindanao was came from the Maguindanaons which have the largest Sultanate in the area before. For almost hundred years had passed before the coming of the colonizers in the Philippines especially in Minda- nao, Muslim people before were live normally, simple and peaceful. But because of the interest of the Spaniards and other colonizers, the Muslim soldiers were fighting against to the power and authority of the colonizers in order to protect its so- vereignty, territory and its culture against any colonial features. These conflicts were continuous spreading in the places in Mindanao and even in the time of our past presidents for the reason that they used the land of Mindanao for the expansion of area to solve the fast population growth in Luzon and a resettlement place for the Gerilyas who were imprisoned. So far, the Mindanao was gradually changing its image from the worst one to the better one but still conflicts were still exist nowadays. For how many years had passed violent actions were minimal because of the strong power and strict security in every place in Mindanao. But Mindanao still likes an ocean that is under siege, He still needs our help in order to make it as a better place to live. Based on the present information that I have gathered terrorist group were trying to make an active action as the sign that they would not surrender their dreams to get Mindanao and to have its own govern- ment, so to show their sign of determination to fight, they were responsible in the bombings happened in the Cotabato area last April. Today, conflicts were still existing even in religion and this was felt by every child, woman and all the people in Mindanao. As a youth today and a citizen for tomorrow we were obliged to make change in our society through our cho- sen advocacy for the development of one‘s life and to have a better place to live .As a concerned citizen of Mindanao, I take this opportunity to have this kind of program- The Philippine Youth Leadership Program where in I can develop my skills, capabilities and acquire more knowledge that we are able to know on how we make our community program and project proposal more effective and last long. I can use my skills and talents to encourage my co-youth to promote my advocacy of making Mindanao a sustainable, peaceful, progressive community and to integrate the living condition of the cultural minor- ities into the mainstream culture and to the national life.

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