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Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
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Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.

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Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.

Philippine Youth Leadership. (2014). Training Manual. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.

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  • 1. Rey Ty 1
  • 2. Rey Ty 2 Philippine Youth Leadership Program 2014 Environmental Leadership in the Philippines: Developing Youth as Agents of Change & Ecological Activism April 12 – May 10, 2014 Training Manual
  • 3. Rey Ty 3 Philippine Youth Leadership Program – Environmental Leadership in the Philippines: Developing Youth as Agents of Change and Ecological Activism This is an open access publication. For the purpose of this book, individual authors retain owner- ship of the copyright for their articles in this manual. Appropriate attribution can be provided by acknowledging the publisher, citing the original author of the work, citing the original article or book properly, and date of the publication in which the item appeared, which does not in any way suggest that we endorse you or your use of the work. For any reuse or redistribution of a work, you must also make clear the terms under which the work was reproduced. Open access to, and free use of, original work ensures the publication is freely and openly available. You may not use this work for commercial purposes. 2014 Northern Illinois University International Training Office DeKalb, Illinois, U.S.A. Internet: http://www.niu.edu/ito/aboutus/index.shtml Disclaimer All ideas expressed here belong to the individual authors. The findings, interpretations, and con- clusions expressed in this volume do not necessarily reflect the views of the International Train- ing Office. Content, style, editing, and proofreading were the responsibility of each author or group of authors. All errors and omissions are those of the contributors. Index •3Rs of Conservation •Action Plan •Art for Social Change •Civic Engagement •Community Health •Campfire •Community Organizing •Community Service •Conflict Management •Cultural Orientation •Diversity •Effective Communication •Environmentalism •Environmental Justice •Environmental Leadership •Green Technology •Hip-Hop for Social Change •Industrial Food •Interaction with American Peers •Night Hike •Philippines •Renewable Energy •Social Media as a Tool for Advocacy •Sustainable Farm •Teambuilding •Transformative Leadership •U.S. Institute of Peace •Volunteer Service •Washington, D. C. •Youth Leadership •Zoological Park Production Credits Printer: Northern Illinois University Printed in the United States of America
  • 4. Rey Ty 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS About the Resource Persons ........................................................................................................ 5 CHAPTER 1: U.S. Culture .......................................................................................................... 8 Cultural Adjustment to the United States ................................................................................... 8 Cultural Orientation to the United States.................................................................................... 9 CHAPTER 2: Leadership .......................................................................................................... 14 Effective Communication for Community Organizing ............................................................ 14 Social Media as a Tool for Advocacy....................................................................................... 17 TRANSFORM: Building Community through Art and Culture (Outline)............................... 22 TRANSFORM: Building Community through Art and Culture (PPT File)............................. 24 Volunteer Community Service Learning.................................................................................. 33 Action Plan................................................................................................................................ 36 CHAPTER 3: Diversity and Interfaith Dialogue..................................................................... 37 In the Shadow of Hate & A Place at the Table......................................................................... 37 Conflict Management & Mediation.......................................................................................... 42 The Art of Conflict Management.............................................................................................. 43 Understanding the Mediation Process ...................................................................................... 44 Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement ................................................................................ 45 CHAPTER 4: Environmentalism and Ecological Activism.................................................... 48 Environmental Issues in the Philippines: Role of Youth in Sustainability............................... 48 Water as a Resource.................................................................................................................. 61 Conservation, Sustainability, Food, & the Environment .......................................................... 69
  • 5. Rey Ty 5 About the Resource Persons (in Alphabetical Order) Reema Ahmad is the Manager of Civic Engagement & Campaigns for Advanc- ing Justice-Chicago, bridging Advancing Justice-Chicago’s empowerment and education initiatives with local community based organizations across the Pan- Asian communities of Illinois. Reema has several years of experience ruffling feathers and causing trouble for the powers that be. Prior to coming to Advancing Justice- Chicago, she co-founded Project Mobilize, a 501(c)4 political action organization dedi- cated to increasing civic participation and representation from politically marginalized communi- ties. Under her leadership as Executive Director, Project M recruited, trained, and ran seven Muslim American candidates for local offices in its first year alone. A firm believer in the civic responsibilities inherent to a full realization of patriotism and identity, Reema has been a long- time advocate of political engagement throughout her local community. She has worked with numerous groups in her hometown of Milwaukee, before joining Chicago civil rights organiza- tion, CAIR-Chicago, where she bridged the gap between elected officials and their Muslim American constituents as well as worked in coalition with community organizations on mutually beneficial policies. Reema maintains her connections across borders by holding board positions with the Islamic Society of Milwaukee and the Peace Learning Center of Milwaukee. Reema re- ceived her B.A. in economics and international affairs from Marquette University. Chris Birks is Assistant Professor of Journalism and New Media at Benedic- tine University in Lisle, IL. Professor Birks has been involved with the Philip- pine Youth Leadership Program at NIU since 2008. In 2011, Professor Birks, along with a group of other academics, journeyed to Mindanao where they ran a series of workshops for a group of the island’s future leaders. Professor Birk’s background is in media and public speaking; he was also a journalist for 20+ years before becoming a teacher. Evelina Jose Cichy recently retired in July 2013 from her position as Vice President of Instruction at Kishwaukee College where she served as the col- lege’s chief academic officer providing leadership for career, college transfer, and adult education certificate and degree programs as well as instructional support services. She started her career teaching English as a Second Language to Southeast Asian and East European refugees and international students. Evelina is very active in the DeKalb area and has served on several boards of community service organizations and regional and state advisory committees that focus on edu- cational and economic opportunities for underprivileged groups. More recently, she worked with the Filipino-American Association of Northern Illinois and they raised over $30,000 for Philip- pine Relief for Typhoon Yolanda. Evelina is currently on the Board of Directors of the National Bank and Trust Company and the Druk Foundation for Art Preservation. Evelina was born in the Philippines and has lived in Hong Kong and Sri Lanka. Andrea L. Guzman is a PhD candidate and instructor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her M.A. in Communication Studies from Northern Illinois University and her B.A. in Communication from Truman State University. Guzman’s research focuses on human-machine communication, artificial intelligence and cultural perceptions of technology. She has presented her research at international and national con-
  • 6. Rey Ty 6 ferences. Guzman teaches courses on communication, technology, and journalism at several col- leges and universities throughout Chicago. Prior to her research and teaching career, Guzman was an award-winning newspaper journalist. Dr. Janice D. Hamlet received her doctorate from Ohio State University. She is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at Northern Illinois Uni- versity. She teaches courses in intercultural communication, rhetoric, and rhetorical criticism. Her research areas include diversity in higher education, womanist theory and methodology; the rhetoric of spirituality; African American rhetoric; gender and communication, and auto-ethnography. Over the years, she has facilitated PYLP and other ITO workshops in both the U.S.A. and in the Philippines. Dancing since the youthful age of 3yrs old, Daniel Haywood, known as BRAVEMONK in the Hip-Hop community, is an eclectic, passionate and en- ergetic soul, whose dance was inspired by Gong-Fu (Martial Arts), his older siblings and various street dance styles. As an Artist, Performer, Choreographer and Educator BRAVEMONK has traveled throughout the U.S. and internation- ally speaking, judging, hosting, dancing and teaching at many cultural Hip-Hop events. He has worked closely with the University of Hip Hop, Temple of Hip Hop, Urban Arts in Action Movement, Hip Hop Congress, the Universal Zulu Nation and the U.S State Department. Over the last 15 years, BRAVEMONK has dedicated his energy towards understanding the origins, developing concepts and mastering the foundations of Hip-Hop’s cultural dance form known as B-Boying/Breakin’ while also putting a focus into oth- er aspects such as Freestyle, House, Hip Hop, Choreography, Movement, Music, Health and Fit- ness. Daniel "BraveMonk" Haywood is currently a member of Chicago’s legendary and interna- tionally recognized breaking crew, Phaze II – Crosstown Crew (Est. 1982). He is also a founding member, active leader, mentor and performer of Awesome Style Konnection (A.S.K.) and FEW Collective. Asad Ali Jafri is a cultural producer, global arts leader and multidisciplinary artist with a creative vision for sustainable social change. As an innovative thinker, Asad utilizes the universal language of art to connect communities, cultures and people to transform our interactions, perceptions, and consciousness. Since 2001, Asad has worked passionately with artists, creatives, and thought leaders across nations, disci- plines, and genres to curate meaningful productions, design sustainable initiatives, and build strong communities. Learn more about Asad at asadalijafri.com. Dr. Tim Paquette is Assistant Director, Training Director, Licensed Clinical Psychologist of the Counseling and Student Development Center (CSDC) of the Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management of NIU. He has been a staff member at the CSDC since 2004 and he has worked exclusively with university students for many years. He provides individual and group counseling and is training director of CSDC's APA accredited doctoral in- ternship program. His areas of expertise include multicultural issues, relationship concerns, men's issues, and anxiety concerns. Dr. Paquette’s professional interests include college student development, diversity education/training, social justice, and supervision. His counseling orien- tation is integrative, with an emphasis on interpersonal-process, humanistic, and cognitive per- spectives. Over the years, he has facilitated PYLP and other ITO workshops in both the U.S.A. and in the Philippines. Dr. Susan Russell (Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1983; Presidential Engagement Professor, 2011) is a cultural anthropologist with specific interests in economic anthropology and the Philippines.
  • 7. Rey Ty 7 Her research has focused on the relationship between ritual and economy and on the role of peasant economic institutions in upland and maritime societies. She has conducted research with upland Ibaloi and Kankana-ey peoples in Luzon, street vendors in Manila, and fishermen in both Thailand and the Philippines. She has also been a visiting professor at the School of Economics, University of the Philip- pines in Diliman, Quezon City. Professor Russell is a core member of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. For the last decade, she has been running international capacity- building exchange programs for young Muslim, Christian and indigenous leaders in the southern Philippines through grants from the Bureau of Educational & Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State. She was named a Presidential Engagement Professor in 2011. She teaches courses in economic anthropology, globalization and contemporary world problems, and introductory an- thropology. Dr. Kendall Thu is a Presidential Engagement Professor and Chair of the De- partment of Anthropology at Northern Illinois University. He has served on the American Anthropological Association’s Committee on Ethics, been the editor of Culture and Agriculture, served on the Boards of the National Association of Prac- ticing Anthropologists and the Central States Anthropological Society, and is a Fellow in the Society for Applied Anthropology. He also served as President of Culture and Agriculture, chaired the Committee on Public Policy for the American Anthropolog- ical Association, and served a two-year term on the National Agricultural Air Quality Task Force under U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman. He has approximately 50 peer reviewed pub- lications examining linkages between the food system, the environment, political power, and oc- cupational health. In addition, he is the co-founder of the Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Wa- ter and the Illinois Food Farm and Consumer Coalition. Dr. Rey Ty received his first master’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley and his second master’s degree and doctorate from NIU. He is the Training Coordinator of the International Training Office of the Division of International Affairs of NIU. His responsibilities include the following: com- municate with faculty for program presentations; preparation of training manu- als and final books, preparation and conduct of programs; development, im- plementation, analysis, and interpretation of evaluations; writing of reports required by funding agencies; update of the website and brochure; serving as a resource person or lecturer; serving as liaison to campus and community groups; photo and video documentation; and, planning and coordination of field visits. He is also an Adjunct Professor of NIU’s Department of Counseling, Adult, and Higher Education. He currently teaches International Adult Higher Education, cover- ing such issues as international organizations, nature and the environment, international political economy, politics, gender, history of struggle, civil society, social movements, culture, and inter- sectionality of identities.
  • 8. Rey Ty 8 CHAPTER 1: U.S. Culture Cultural Adjustment to the United States Evelina Jose Cichy I. Introduction: The Excitement of Arriving in the US a. Heightened Expectations b. Jet Lag c. Weather d. Surroundings e. Homesickness II. Identifying Some Differences Between Filipino and American Culture a. Culture Shock 1. Definitions and examples 2. How to cope with culture shock b. Values and Customs 1. How values dictate cultural behaviors 2. Examples of some popular traditions and customs 3. Differences and similarities in our values and customs c. Food 1. Diet and nutrition 2. How food influences our culture d. Material Conveniences 1. Technology 2. Transportation 3. Economy and Work III. Appreciation of Filipino-American Contributions to the US a. Brief History of Filipino Immigration to the US 1. History timeline 2. Who are the Filipino-American immigrants? b. The Promise of the American Dream IV. Conclusion: Understanding the Importance of Cross-Cultural Communication Strategies for a Successful Stay
  • 9. Rey Ty 9 Cultural Orientation to the United States Welcome to DeKalb, Illinois! April 14, 2014 Presented by Evelina Jose Cichy I. Introduction: The Excitement of Arriving in the US A. Heightened Expectations  You have been building up numerous expectations about the US experience.  Is everything you imagined about the US really true? DeKalb is not Hollywood.  You have been given an opportunity and you will take advantage of this by doing the best you can.  “I will prove that I will be successful.” B. Jet Lag  “I am so tired, I need to sleep.”  “I am so awake, I need to do something.” C. Weather  It is so cold and dreary – winter has been long and spring has been delayed.  How to dress in cold weather.  Adjusting to the cold weather will also affect your health. D. Surroundings  It’s flat everywhere – Midwest is prairie land  People are very friendly.  You don’t understand what they are saying – getting used to listening and speaking Eng- lish all day. E. Homesickness  Missing your family, friends, and Filipino food. II. Cultural Adjustment Adjusting to a new culture and surroundings can be uncomfortable and exciting. But allow your- self the opportunity to learn new experiences. You will grow tremendously through new experi- ences, new knowledge, and a better understanding of other cultures. Be aware that you will be going through a period of adjustment that will require you to change your attitudes and percep- tions about other people. A. Definitions and examples of culture shock – living in a different culture will bring about ex- periences of discomfort and anxiety. It is important that you are aware of these changes so that you are prepared and able to cope. Some may not go through all these stages and some may spend a longer period of time in one of the stages. Fluency in the English language will not be as big a barrier to communication among Filipinos. A. Stages 1. anticipation – excitement, many emotions, many details, “honeymoon” 2. culture shock – tiredness, dominant use of second language, homesickness, food needs, unhappiness with surroundings 3. adjustment – returning to normal and regular energy level; sense of better understand- ing of your surroundings, smoother interaction with people around you 4. re-entry shock – return to your culture; critical of what you see around you that could be better or different B. How to cope with culture shock and period of adjustment
  • 10. Rey Ty 10 1. keep your mind open to changes and observe your surroundings; ask questions 2. rest and give your body and mind time to relax; eat your comfort foods; social inter- action is important; exercise; communicate with your family 3. continue to stay busy; keep up with your schedule and an eye on your goals 4. be open to learning and gaining new experiences III. Identifying Some Similarities and Differences between Filipino and American Culture A. Values  Values determine what is important to you and how you perceive what is important and right for you.  Your values will dictate how you behave.  Understanding the differences will help you adjust to your new surroundings and inform you on how to better interact with those around you. B. Similarities and differences in values that influence behavior  The United States represents diverse populations.  References are made to its culture as a melting pot or a salad bowl.  Understand that these are stereotypes and cannot be generalized to apply to everyone. Filipino American Interdependence – importance of family and group, decision-making is based on influence of family, extended family, mutual support, personal information Independence – individuality, nuclear family, pri- vacy, rights of the individual above all else Time – time can wait; past and future Time – punctuality, time is money, present Learning – listen and understand Learning – question and challenge Formality – use of titles, respect for age Informality – use of first names, casual conversa- tions Indirect communication – use of body language and gestures, touching Direct communication – may appear aggressive and blunt, eye contact, spontaneity, express feel- ings, personal space Harmony, avoidance of conflict, self-restraint (sometimes misunderstood as meekness) Competition Food emphasis – social activity Diet consciousness, availability of many choices Spirituality and fate Self determination and secularism C. Material Conveniences  Access to technology is more prevalent across income levels.  Value of information source (family, friends, outside information)  Importance of transportation to mobility of individuals to do/go as they please  Working at a young age to develop more independence compared to working to help family income  Bigger is better, excess and availability IV. A Brief History of Filipinos in the US (This information is provided in recognition of Asian-American Heritage Month at NIU.) A. History timeline  Oct. 18, 1587 – Filipinos landed in Morro Bay, CA. October is Filipino American Histo- ry Month.
  • 11. Rey Ty 11  1635 – Filipinos jumped ship from the Spanish galleons. They were called the Manila- men and they settled in Louisiana where they worked in a fishing village.  1903 – Filipino students (pensionados) arrive in the US as part of the Pensionado Pro- gram. They were brought here to be educated and learn about democracy.  1907 – Filipino laborers arrive in Hawaii.  1925 – Filipinos arrive in California to work in farms.  1965 – Immigration quotas increased the number of Filipinos immigrating to the US. In the 70s, 30,000 Filipinos immigrated to the US each year. B. Who are the Filipino-American immigrants?  Filipino immigrants make up the third largest immigrant group in the US, after Mexicans and Chinese. Asian-Americans make up 6% of US population. Origin Population Chinese 4 mil. 23.2% Filipino 3.4 mil. 19.7% Indian 3.1 mil. 18.4% Vietnamese 1.73 mil. 10.0% Korean 1.7 mil. 9.9% Japanese 1.3 mil. 7.5% Source: Pew Research and Demographic Data, 2013  Most Filipinos reside in California, Hawaii, New York, and Chicago.  More Filipinos feel comfortable living in the US than other Asian groups.  Predominant occupations are in the health care field and service sector. IV. Conclusion: Some Strategies for Cultural Adjustment  Familiarity with English language will be a great help with communicating.  Observe your surroundings and hold your judgments.  Ask questions to better understand what is being said or done.  Most Americans are not knowledgeable about the Philippines – be prepared to answer questions and explain.  Express yourself clearly, learn to be more direct with responses.  Participate and be involved.  Be true to yourself.
  • 12. Rey Ty 12 Cultural Orientation to the United States Evelina Jose Cichy
  • 13. Rey Ty 13 NOTES: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  • 14. Rey Ty 14 CHAPTER 2: Leadership Effective Communication for Community Organizing Chris Birks
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  • 17. Rey Ty 17 Social Media as a Tool for Advocacy Andrea Guzman
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  • 22. Rey Ty 22 TRANSFORM: Building Community through Art and Culture (Outline) Asad Ali Jafri 9am Intro a. Mic Check – 1, 2, 1, 2 (Introduction to Hip Hop’s Tradition of Call and Response) b. Name, Dance, Revolution (A fun movement based way to get to know each other) c. Quick Introduction to Facilitators 9:30am Art/Culture for Social Change – Hip Hop as a Case Study (Slides) a. What is Hip Hop? b. What are the Elements of Hip Hop? c. Hip Hop’s Roots in Social Change d. Hip Hop’s Connections to Indigenous Cultures Discussion 9:45am Rhythm a.) Make the Music/BodyBeat How can you make music with no instruments? What is rhythm and how do we use it to communicate? Why is rhythm important in community work? b.) Small Group Rhythm Exercise 10:15 Art/Culture for Social Change - Start with Yourself (Slides) a. The importance of individual wellness in community transformation b. Asad’s personal story c. The importance of individual wellness in community transformation Discussion 10:45 Vocals a.) Learning to amplify, articulate, and annunciate b.) Che Che Cole – Vocal, Rhythm, and Movement exercise c.) The importance of clear communication 11:00 Movement a.) Hip Hop Dance 101 b.) How does moving your body relate to movement building? 11:30 LUNCH BREAK
  • 23. Rey Ty 23 1pm Reflection and Discussion 1:15 Write and Draw Your Way to Change (In Small Groups) 1:45 Art/Culture for Social Change – Build Community (Slides) a.) How do we as individuals become agents of change b.) The importance of individual wellness in community transformation Discussion 2:00 Vocal Melody and Harmony Exercises (In Large Groups) a.) Creating a harmony out of differences b.) How to have unity without needing to be uniform 2:15 Break into small groups to create performances 2:45 Present performances 3:15 Discussion and Wrap Up NOTES: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  • 24. Rey Ty 24 TRANSFORM: Building Community through Art and Culture (PPT File) Asad Ali Jafri
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  • 33. Rey Ty 33 Volunteer Community Service Learning Rey Ty I. Volunteer Community Service Learning A. Brainstorming: Humility, Service, Learn from the people, Give back to society, Change society, Forget your ego, Think of others, Engage in acts of kindness to (1) fellows, (2) animals, and (3) nature, and Serve the people B. Goal Setting Service Learning Sessions A teaching and learning approach that integrates volunteer community service with academic study to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen community (National Commission on Service Learning) 1. Goals a. Promote mutual understanding b. Strengthen democratic values and active citizenship c. Appreciate governmental and legal structures d. Understand diversity of society e. Strengthen skills for participatory approaches 2. Objectives a. Learn about civil society through volunteerism and civic engagement b. Be aware of the importance of the rule of law c. Participate in community building d. Learn about rights and responsibilities e. Develop skills f. Promote effective, accountable, transparent, and responsive government g. Forge partnerships and share lessons learned h. Engage in dialogue in civic participation, human rights, jus- tice, tolerance, participatory development, and grassroots empowerment i. Design and implement action plans 3. Service Outcomes a. Learning Outcomes i. Enhanced learning ii. Active learning through meaningful work iii. Understand socio-economic issues affecting the community iv. Continuing reciprocal communication v. Critical reflection 4. Democracy Outcomes a. Enhanced citizenship involvement b. Increased understanding of human rights, diversity, ethnici- ty, social justice, and socio-economic tensions c. Cultural awareness and breaking stereotypes d. Civic participation 5. Process Outcomes a. Active involvement in community service b. Mutual respect 6. Care for others 7. Increased direct services
  • 34. Rey Ty 34 8. Interaction community folks with whom participants will normally not have the change C. Three Views of Citizenship 1. Personally responsible citizenship: donate canned goods 2. Participatory citizenship: help organize food drive 3. Justice-oriented citizenship: work toward the elimination of hunger D. Citizenship Commitments 1. Thin Commitment 1. charity-oriented 2. scratch the surface 3. patronizing 4. perpetuate inequality 2. Different Approaches 1. Conservative: Performance, Efficiency, Top-Down 2. Liberal: Touchy-Feely, Horizontal 3. Justice: Social Change, Bottom Up II. Preparation 1. Pre-Service Orientation 1. Scholarship of Engagement a. Volunteer community work b. Link theory with practice c. Problem Solving: Critical Reflection and Critical Social Action d. Personal transformation e. Interpersonal development f. Skills in collaboration g. Social transformation 2. Socio-Economic-Cultural Context a. Understand the community and its needs b. Fill community needs c. Social justice issues: structures of inequality and inclusion 2. Linking Theory with Practice: Link concepts you have learned (theory) with knowledge, skills, and values you gain from the community work (practice) 3. Reflection on the Experience: What have you learned? How do you feel? So what (critique and interpretation)? Now what (what will you do to have a social impact)? 4. Reciprocity: Self-inventory. What are your social identities? As- sets? Motivations? Expectations? 5. Reciprocity: Understand the Community. Match your self- inventory with the community needs. Social investigation: social mapping, social profiling; community organization; community people; neighbor- hood; community assets and challenges; service tasks; how to respond to community needs III. Placement: community partners’ inputs; challenges; active observer; various tasks; posi- tive contribution; responsibilities IV. Conduct of Service Learning A. Not about you, but the community; you are not superior to community members B. Mutual respect be sensitive; not disruptive; don’t talk down to community mem- bers; respect people who are hungry and homeless C. Don’t be an outsider voyeur; be a collaborator; trade shoes
  • 35. Rey Ty 35 D. Link and talk with community folks and service providers E. Recognize differences but don’t think you are better; don’t stereotype “the oth- ers;” honor uniqueness F. Recognize similarities but understand differences based on economic wealth, gender, politics, culture, homelessness, etc. G. Don’t judge your community partners. Don’t impose your values. Don’t romanti- cize either. H. Integrate social justice. Don’t say what you do is neutral or “good work.” Call “oppression” oppression; otherwise, we are involved in perpetuating it. I. Admit that there is power imbalance. As service providers, you are advantaged over the people whom you serve. Cultivate respect. V. Post-Service Activities A. Give token or certificate of appreciation on the spot. B. Critical reflection. C. Discuss. Personal transformation? Social transformation? D. Send a non-commercial, hand-made, not-computer-printed, home-made thank- you card, note, letter, or email. Do not criticize. VI. Ideas for Community Projects A. Charity Work: Do not rock the boat. 1. Donate old clothes and canned goods. 2. Give food for the poor. 3. Volunteer as a receptionist for a fund-raising dinner. 4. Donate blood. 5. Tutor a poor student enrolled in a public school. 6. Donate money to a group with which you have a common cause. B. Policy or Social Reform: Rock the Boat 1. Join a protest action about an important social issue (elimination of hunger) 2. Write or talk to a politician to change a public policy. 3. Join a non-governmental organization or a social movement. 4. Use a bicycle or public transportation to go places. 5. Organize and mobilize your friends to work for a cause: environ- ment, women’s rights, workers’ wages 6. Boycott, vote, or run for public office and in the process engage in public education 7. Money is important but think of a career that will make a differ- ence (not only think of profits) 8. Engage in micro-lending for empowerment
  • 36. Rey Ty 36 Action Plan Dr. Rey Ty Project Title: General Goal/s: Prepared by: Implementation Date: Why? Specific Objectives How? Specific Tasks Who? Human Resources What? Material Resources When? Time Frame Evaluation: Success Criteria 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.
  • 37. Rey Ty 37 CHAPTER 3: Diversity and Interfaith Dialogue In the Shadow of Hate & A Place at the Table The Battle Against Intolerance and Discrimination Workshop Facilitator: Dr. Janice D. Hamlet Associate Professor Department of Communication Northern Illinois University
  • 38. Rey Ty 38 Key Terms Cultural Competency An ability to interact effectively with people of different cultural backgrounds. Cultural competency comprises four components: (1) awareness of one’s own cultural background and worldview; (2) a positive attitude toward cultural differences; (3) knowledge of different cultural traditions, practices and worldviews; and (4) cross-cultural skills. Developing cultural compe- tence results in an ability to understand interact and communicate effectively with people repre- senting other backgrounds and cultures. Discrimination The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people or things i.e. ethnici- ty, race, age, gender, religion, sexuality, ability, etc. Diversity Refers to the variety of experiences, expressions and perspectives, which arise, from dif- ferences in race, culture, religion, mental or physical abilities, heritage, age, gender, sexual orien- tation, and other characteristics. Diversity is a significant component of multiculturalism. Ethnocentrism The belief in the intrinsic superiority of one’s own ethnic group or culture over others. It is often accompanied by feelings of dislike for other groups. Equity Involves access to equal opportunity and the development of basic capacity. It requires eliminating all barriers to economic and political opportunities and access to education and basic services, such that people (men and women of all ages, conditions and positions) can enjoy these opportunities and benefit from them. It is the recognition of diversity without these characteris- tics providing reasons for discrimination. Intersectionality Seeks to examine how various biological, social and cultural categories such as gender, race, ability, sexual orientation and other areas of identity interact on multiple and other simulta- neous levels, contributing to systematic injustice and social inequality. Multiculturalism The active, purposeful and consistent valuing, respecting and inclusion of people who come from different backgrounds and experiences. Tolerance The capacity and practice of recognizing and respecting the beliefs and practices of oth- ers.
  • 39. Rey Ty 39 (A video presentation) Produced by Teaching Tolerance Through archival photographs, motion picture footage, and eyewitness reports, this video traces historic incidents of racial and ethnic discrimination from the dawn of American history to con- temporary times. As you watch the video presentation, consider the following questions: • How has intolerance been expressed in American History? • What are some of the underlying causes of intolerance? • What examples of intolerance can you think of in your own school and/or community today? • What can you do to improve these situations? How can you help? NOTES: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  • 40. Rey Ty 40 (Struggles for equality in America) A Video Presentation Produced by Teaching Tolerance The stories in this video feature the courageous efforts of unsung heroes who toppled barriers in education, voting, employment, housing and other areas in order to participate more fully in American democracy. The video introduces eight teenagers who voice the challenges of creating and sustaining an inclusive American society. As you watch this video presentation considers the following questions: • Did the video presentation, “A Place at the Table” present a troubling vision of America or a hopeful one? • What special challenges will you and your peers face in championing liberty and equality for everyone and how will you meet those challenges? NOTES: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  • 41. Rey Ty 41 Think about the perspectives, attitudes, talents and skills you possess that would be useful in working with others in bringing about harmony and peace. Be prepared to discuss your answer. ________________________ _________________________ ________________________ _________________________ ________________________ _________________________ ________________________ _________________________ Diversity will continue to place increasing demands on us and present formidable chal- lenges for businesses, educational institutions, health care systems, the criminal justice system governmental entities and the communities. The demands and challenges center on CHANGE. The status quo is no longer an option. Therefore: You be the change you wish to see. (Mahatma Gandhi)
  • 42. Rey Ty 42 Conflict Management & Mediation Dr. Tim Paquette Northern Illinois University Counseling & Student Development Center Presentation Outline  Introductions, ground rules, & preparing to work 1) Acknowledging and understanding our similarities and differences 2) Understanding the experiences, perspectives, biases, and assumptions we bring into the room 3) The ground rules (e.g., respect, do not interrupt, let everyone have a chance)  Understanding your values & the values of others 1) Values shuffle 2) The sea turtles & the eagles  Understanding your conflict style & strategies 1) Review of different conflict styles a. Direct vs. Indirect b. Talking vs. Listening c. Goals vs. Relationships 2) What is your conflict style? How do you react in a conflict situation? 3) The impact of values and culture on our conflict style (e.g., family vs. peers, societal norms and standards, comfort level/familiarity with someone) BREAK  Conflict Management & Mediation 1) Basic principles of conflict management & mediation 2) Putting the principles into action  Group Activity 1) What are the primary reasons for the conflict in Mindanao? 2) How would you end the conflict? What are your solutions? 3) What are the barriers and obstacles that stand in the way to ending the conflict? 4) What needs to change/be different for the conflict to end?  Group Discussion & Wrap Up
  • 43. Rey Ty 43 The Art of Conflict Management Conflicts are an inevitable part of human interaction. Conflict occurs when two or more people need to examine and express their behaviors, thoughts, and feelings. The process of conflict management is focused on a positive and productive solution for all involved. Conflict manage- ment is about healthy, assertive, and open communication not aggressive confrontation. Steps to Successful Conflict Management 1) DO NOT attempt to resolve a conflict when you are experiencing “in the moment” emo- tional reactions  Wait until you can approach the situation more calmly 2) Include all persons involved in the conflict and make sure they are present  Find times to talk that are best for all  Don’t expect others to stop what they’re doing when you’re ready to talk  Allow enough time to thoroughly discuss the situation 3) Come to agreement about the source of the conflict  Be specific and don’t make assumptions that someone else “knows what you’re talking about” 4) Provide opportunities for each person to express his or her point of view  Take turns sharing perceptions and feelings  Listen! Don’t cut people off and let them talk until finished  This process is not about “winning” an argument or debate, it’s about facilitating communication 5) Validate the other person’s position  Try to understand others’ point of view and verbalize that understanding  Be honest. If you don’t understand what someone is saying, let them know this 6) Identify changes or compromises that can be made by each person  Negotiate options and brainstorm ways to solve the conflict 7) Develop a plan of action that specifies responsibilities and expectations for each person  Is everyone satisfied with this plan? 8) Make a commitment to make necessary changes 9) Set a time to follow-up and check-in about the identified resolution  If the conflict remains unsolved, attempt the process again
  • 44. Rey Ty 44 Understanding the Mediation Process What is Mediation? Mediation is the intervention of a trained neutral third party to facilitate a solution to a conflict Mediation helps the involved parties understand and explore their concerns and perspectives Mediation helps the involved parties take a more objective view of the conflict and reduces the negative impact of subjective perspectives Mediation often provides the involved parties more than one way to resolve their concerns, and when done successfully, an outcome that maximizes the interests of both parties A Mediator Must Be: A good communicator A good listener An advocate for both of the involved parties, not for one party more than another Able to summarize other people’s opinions and feelings without letting their own opinions and feelings negatively impact the process Able to use language that is clear and descriptive, never insensitive or inflammatory Able to utilize reasoning and negotiating skills in order to provide solutions to resolve conflicts Questions to Ask Before Attempting Mediation: Are the individuals involved in the conflict unable to find an independent solution? Are the individuals willing to utilize a neutral third party to facilitate the resolution process? Do the individuals recognize that the mediator is not responsible for the success or failure of the mediation process? Are individuals aware that the mediator is not being involved to “take sides” or be convinced about who is “right”? NOTE: You must complete extensive training to be a professional mediator! (but you can see how the steps for mediation can be helpful in your life)
  • 45. Rey Ty 45 Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement Presented by Reema Ahmad I. INTRODUCTIONS ● Introduce self → brief history of my background, family, schooling → professional work (add to what is said in bio) ● Lay out in general terms what the next 2 hours will look like: → We’re going to talk about what leadership is, what it looks like, etc. → Work on improving the skills we already have in order to make us better leaders and get the work we want to see done manifested in reality. II. WHAT IS LEADERSHIP? ● Who is a leader? ● What do leaders look like? ● Example of a leader in action: Obama Speech at DNC ***start at 1:09, go to 8:08*** → watch clip of Obama telling story of self, story of us, story of now → Ask students to pay attention/take notes of what they see/hear/feel that makes them think of a leader or leadership ● Deconstruct leadership → What did you hear? see? → How did you feel? → What is a take-away message? → How did Obama convey his message? III. STORYTELLING ● Storytelling as innate to human nature, human experience → How many of you have ever told a story before? → How have you used stories? → When do you tell stories? → How do stories make you feel? ● Stories move people to action, so the most effective leaders are always ones that have a compelling story that is authentic, connects with others, and have clear next steps
  • 46. Rey Ty 46 ● Come back to the larger group and give everyone a chance to present → In addition to knowing yourself, your story, an effective leader is able to speak publicly → Introduce ‘power pose’ (example in Amy Cuddy TED Talk) → Provide cape for everyone to use → Make sure people LISTEN! IV. INTENTIONAL LEADERSHIP ● How does everyone feel? ● What did you learn about yourself: purpose? vision? ● We can recognize leaders, but they do not take one set shape: Student Activist Example → Show video of student using their story of self as a social actor → Ask students to pay attention once more ● Who you are (story) impacts your leadership (development). What we see is that leadership is the necessary backbone for change. V. LIVING WITH PURPOSE ● PRES model ***ATTRIBUTE TO ARIEL GROUP!*** 1. Being PRESENT: the ability to be completely in the moment & flexible enough to handle the unexpected. 2. REACHING out: the ability to build relationships through empathy, listening, & authentic connections. 3. EXPRESSIVENESS: the ability to express feelings & emotions appropriately using words, voice, body, & face, to deliver one congruent message. 4. SELF-knowing: the ability to accept yourself, to be authentic, to reflect your values in your decisions & actions. ● Think of the two video examples we saw today, as well as the examples of all the leaders we have in this room → How did we see this model in action? → How do the definitions of a leader that we discussed earlier relate or fit in? ● Make connection between individual story and role as social agents for change → The exercises we’ve done today have shown us that leadership involves skills. (ask what are some of those skills) ...These are not innate, instead they take time to work on, practice, and hone. → Leaders are not born, they are made. VI. CLOSING
  • 47. Rey Ty 47 ● While home is on the horizon for most of you and this hopefully excit- ing/insightful/fun experience is coming to a close, each of you will be continuing along your individual journeys as leaders within your respective communities. ● Before we end today, I want you to pull out a piece of paper and think about these three questions: 1. What is something you’ve done? (recognize where you come from/what makes you) 2. What is something you’re doing? (recognize the value you are already giving) 3. What is something you will do? (recognize your potential) ● This last exercise was for you. Please take these notes back and keep them as a reminder while you continue along your journey as leaders. You have each done much to get to where you are today. You are doing wonderful things right now. And the horizon is limitless for your potential. NOTES: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  • 48. Rey Ty 48 CHAPTER 4: Environmentalism and Ecological Activism Environmental Issues in the Philippines: Role of Youth in Sustainability Dr. Susan Russell
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  • 61. Rey Ty 61 Water as a Resource Presented by Dr. Melissa Lenczewski
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  • 69. Rey Ty 69 Conservation, Sustainability, Food, & the Environment Dr. Kendall Thu
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