Howard Zinn 2 Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty"
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Howard Zinn 2 Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty"

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"Howard Zinn" Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty"

"Howard Zinn" Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty"

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    Howard Zinn 2 Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty" Howard Zinn 2 Philippines (c) 2010 "Rey Ty" Presentation Transcript

      • Howard Zinn on the Philippines
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ To me, it is Mark Twain who is a hero, because he denounced President Theodore Roosevelt after Roosevelt had praised an American general who had massacred hundreds of people in the Philippines” (Vol. 1, p. x).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “… President McKinley told a visiting group of ministers how he had come to the decision to annex the Philippines” (Vol. 1, p. 187).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ As he [President McKinley] prayed for guidance, he became convinced that ‘there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them… And then I went to bed and went to sleep and slept soundly” (Vol. 1, p. 187).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ The Filipinos, however, did not get a message from God telling them to accept American rule” (Vol. 1, p. 187).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Instead, in February 1899, they [the Filipinos] rose up in revolt against the United States, just as they had revolted several times against Spain” (Vol. 1, p. 187).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ The taste of empire was on the lips of politicians and businessmen throughout the United States, and they agreed that the United States must keep control of its new territory” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “Talk of money mingled with talk of destiny and civilization” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ ‘ The Philippines are ours forever,’ Senator Beveridge told the U.S. Senate” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ ‘ And just beyond the Philippines are China’s illimitable markets… We will not retreat from either” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ It took the United States three years to crush the Filipino rebellion. It was a harsh war” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “Americans lost many more troops [in the Philippines] than in Cuba” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ For the Filipinos the death rate was enormous, from battle and from disease” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ McKinley said the fighting with the rebels started when the rebels attacked American forces” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “Later, American soldiers testified that the United States had fired the first shot” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ The famous American author Mark Twain summed up the Philippine war with disgust, saying…” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • Mark Twain said: “ ‘We have pacified some thousands of the islanders and buried them; destroyed their fields; burned their villages, and turned their widows and orphans out-of-doors… And so, by these Providences of God—the phrase is the government’s, not mine—we are a World Power’ ” (Vol. 1, p. 189).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ The Anti-Imperialist League worked to educate the American public about the horrors of the Philippine war and the evils of imperialism, or empire building” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ The Anti-Imperialist League… published letters from soldiers on duty in the Philippines” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “There were reports of soldiers killing women, children, and prisoners of war” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ A black soldier named William Fulbright wrote from Manila, the capital of the Philippines, ‘This struggle on the islands has been naught but a gigantic scheme of robbery and oppression’ ” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “Race as an issue in the Philippines, as it had been in Cuba” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Some white American soldiers were racists who considered the Filipinos inferior” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Black American soldiers in the Philippines had mixed feelings. Some felt pride, the desire to show that blacks were as courageous and patriotic as whites. Some wanted the chance to get ahead in life through the military” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Some others [Black soldiers] felt that they were fighting a brutal war against people of color—not too different from the violence against black people in the United States, where drunken white soldiers in Tampa, Florida, started a race riot by using a black child for target practice” (Vol. 1, p. 190).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Back in the United States, many African Americans turned against the Philippine war because they saw it as a racial conflict, the white race fighting to conquer the brown” (Vol. 1, pp. 190-191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “They [African Americans] were fighting injustice at home, too” (Vol. 1, p. 191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ A group of African Americans in Massachusetts sent a message to President McKinley, criticizing him for doing nothing to advance racial equality” (Vol. 1, p. 191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Throughout the nineteenth century, black Americans, along with women, workers, and the poor, had raised their voices against oppression” (Vol. 1, p. 191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Many had found ways to resist the harshest effects of a political and economic system that ignored them” (Vol. 1, p. 191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “In the coming century, they would take their own steps toward change” (Vol. 1, p. 191).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “Anger was on the rise in America as the twentieth century opened” (Vol. 2, p. 1).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “The United States had just won the Spanish-American War” (Vol. 2, p. 1).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • “ Emma Goldman, an anarchist and feminist of the time, later remembered how the war in Cuba and the Philippines had filled people with patriotism:…” (Vol. 2, p. 1).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • Emma Goldman wrote: “How our hearts burned with indignation against the atrocious Spaniards!...” (Vol. 2, p. 1).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Howard Zinn. (2007).
      • Emma Goldman wrote: “But when the smoke was over, the dead buried, and the cost of the war came back to the people in an increase in the price of commodities…and rent—that is, when we sobered up from our patriotic spree—it suddenly dawned on us that the cause of the Spanish American war was the price of sugar… that the lives, blood and money of the American people were used to protect the interests of the American capitalists” (Vol. 2, p. 1).
      © 2010 Rey Ty
    • Reference Howard Zinn. (2007). A Young People’s History of the United States. Vols. 1 & 2. Adapted by Rebecca Stefoff. New York: Seven Stories Press. © 2010 Rey Ty
      • Howard Zinn on the Philippines
      © 2010 Rey Ty