2014. Training Manual on  “Technology, Leadership and American Culture”  For Faculty and Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University International Training Office.
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2014. Training Manual on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Faculty and Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University International Training Office.

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2014. Training Manual on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Undergraduate Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology, Department of Mechanical ...

2014. Training Manual on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Undergraduate Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering &
rey ty, Northern Illinois University, Mechanical Engineering , Zhejiang University of Technology, International Training Office
Division of International Affairs

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2014. Training Manual on  “Technology, Leadership and American Culture”  For Faculty and Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University International Training Office. 2014. Training Manual on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Faculty and Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University International Training Office. Document Transcript

  • Northern Illinois University
  • Edited by Rey Ty 2 Training Program on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Undergraduate Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology Department of Mechanical Engineering & International Training Office Division of International Affairs Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois, U.S.A. July 27 – August 16, 2014
  • Edited by Rey Ty 3 A Training Manual on “Technology, Leadership and American Culture” For Undergraduate Students of Mechanical Engineering in Zhejiang University of Technology. This is an open access publication. Individual authors retain ownership of the copyright for their articles. The copyright for the purposes of the papers in this manual is retained by the individual authors. Appropriate attribution can be provided by acknowledging the publisher, citing the original author of the work, citing the original article and book properly, and date of the publication in which the item appeared, which does not in any way suggest that we endorse you or your use of the work. For any reuse or redistribution of a work, you must also make clear the terms under which the work was reproduced. Open access to, and free use of, original work ensures the publication is freely and openly available. You may not use this work for commercial purposes. 2014 Northern Illinois University Department of Mechanical Engineering and International Training Office DeKalb, Illinois, U.S.A. Internet: http://www.niu.edu/me/ and http://www.niu.edu/ito/aboutus/index.shtml Disclaimer: All ideas expressed here belong to the individual authors. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this volume do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the International Training Office. Content, style, editing, and proofreading were the responsibility of each author or group of authors. All errors and omissions are those of the contributors. Index •Advanced Machining Processes •Advancements of Materials •Caterpillar •Chicago •Cultural Orientation •Eiger Laboratory •English Language •Fermi National Laboratory •Freedom Field Energy •Laser-Aided Manufacturing Processes •Leadership •Leadership Camp •Madison, Wisconsin •Micro-Manufacturing •Museum of Science and Industry •Robotics •Solar Farm •U.S. Culture •U.S. Geography •Vibrations •Wanxiang Plant Production Credits Printer: Northern Illinois University Printed in the United States of America
  • Edited by Rey Ty 4 CREDITS NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY FACULTY AND STAFF Vice President for International Affairs Dr. Ray Alden Associate Vice President for International Affairs Dr. Deborah Pierce College of Engineering & Engineering Technology (CEET) Dean Dr. Promod Vohra Department of Mechanical Engineering Chair Dr. Pradip Majumdar Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor & Project Director Dr. Jenn-Terng Gau International Training Office Director Dr. Lina Ong International Training Office Program Coordinator Leslie Shive International Training Office Training Coordinator Dr. Rey Ty International Training Office Training Specialist Dr. Srie Ramli International Training Office Program Assistant Jon Honstadt International Training Office Graduate Assistant Sai Sindhu Matam International Training Office Graduate Assistant Yangbing Lu Department of Mechanical Engineering Office Manager Beatrice Kooken FACULTY NOTES (IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE) Intercultural Orientation; U.S. and Chicago Geography Dr. Rey Ty Advanced Machining Processes Dr. Matt Gonser Robotics Dr. Ji-Chul Ryu Vibrations Dr. Abhijit Gupta Laser-Aided Manufacturing Processes Dr. Federico Sciammarella Leadership Dr. Rey Ty Advancements of Materials; Micro-Manufacturing Dr. Jenn-Terng Gau
  • Edited by Rey Ty 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS CREDITS........................................................................................................................................ 3 NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY FACULTY AND STAFF.......................................... 4 FACULTY NOTES (IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE) ............................................................ 4 CATERPILLAR SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR AURORA FACILITY PLANT TOURS........... 6 HOT-CLIMATE AND COLD-CLIMATE PEOPLE..................................................................... 7 INTERCULTURAL ORIENTATION & INTRODUCING U.S. CULTURES........................... 10 MACHINING PROCESSES ........................................................................................................ 23 ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING ............................................................................................... 37 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS ............................................................................................. 51 HUMANOID ROBOTS................................................................................................................ 55 WHAT KINDS OF ROBOTS IN SKY? ...................................................................................... 59 CONTROL OF MULTIPLE ROBOTS........................................................................................ 63 MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS................................................................................................... 66 LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING ........................................................................................ 74 LEADERSHIP .............................................................................................................................. 89 LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP....................................................................................................... 90 AN INTRODUCTION OF MICROMANUFACTURING: MICROFORMING......................... 94
  • Edited by Rey Ty 6 Caterpillar Form No. 01-080505-06 PC (2402) MS Word 97 CATERPILLAR SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR AURORA FACILITY PLANT TOURS Dress and Personal Items  Visitors must be at least 12 years old to tour our facilities.  OSHA approved Safety glasses with side shields will be provided and must be worn at all times. These will fit over your prescription glasses. Sunglasses are not allowed.  Steel Toe Shoes are required. Shoe covers will be provided to those without steel toes. Feet must be completely covered (No Sandals, No open toes or heels). Heels should not exceed 16 mm in thickness. Spike heels are prohibited to enter the shop.  Cameras are prohibited inside the factory.  Long Pants required (Shorts are prohibited inside the factory).  Cells phones are requested to be turned to vibrate mode or off during the visit.  Rings and dangling jewelry are to be removed to enter the factory.  Caterpillar Aurora is a smoke free campus. Smoking is not allowed anywhere on plant site.  Caterpillar staff will provide emergency procedures instructions upon arrival.  No cameras are allowed in the factory. Special Needs  Visitors with walking casts, orthopedic devices, and crutches must notify Caterpillar and make special arrangements for safe transportation within our facilities. Carts or wheelchairs can be provided  Standard Wheelchairs are allowed as long as prior communication is sent to Caterpillar preceding the visitor tour. A Caterpillar representative must assist in guiding the chair. Powered wheel chairs are not permitted in the plants.  Canes are allowed within our facilities and visitors using them need not make special arrangements as above unless their walking ability is severely limited by distance.  For Security reasons, name badges must be worn at all times while visiting our facilities.
  • Edited by Rey Ty 7 HOT-CLIMATE AND COLD-CLIMATE PEOPLE Dr. Ty, Rey 郑文华 博士 According to Lanier (2000), there is a distinction between intercultural relationship and cross- cultural relationship. Intercultural relationship is the relationship between and among people with different cultural practices which are totally alien to one another, while cross-cultural relationship is the relationship among people with cultural practices which are similar or the same. Based on Lanier’s typology, the Philippines belongs to the hot-climate region of the world and the U.S. to the cold-climate region. However, Southern U.S. is a hot-climate region “of its own kind,” with its “southern brand of hospitality.” Although this essay presents intercultural hot-versus-cold caricatures, there are in fact cross-cultural similarities between the hot and cold climate cultures. Also, there are hot and cold climate regions, say, within the generally cold- climate country, such as the cold-climate northern and hot-climate southern states of the U.S. This essay is based on the book Sarah A. Lanier (2000) wrote titled Foreign to Familiar: A Guide to Understanding Hot and Cold-Climate Cultures. There are seven distinctions between hot- and cold-climate cultures. They are the following. (1) relationship versus task orientation;(2) direct versus indirect communication; (3) individualism versus group identity; (4) inclusion versus privacy; (5) different concepts of hospitality; (6) high-context versus low-context cultures; and, (7) different concepts of time and planning. Hot-Climate People versus Cold-Climate People Hot-climate cultures are relationship-based. Communications need to build up a “feel-good” atmosphere in society, although this may not be the case for individuals. Human beings take precedence over efficiency and time. Furthermore, it is rude to “talk business” immediately upon arrival at a business meeting or to make a business phone call upon arrival at the same meeting. On the other hand, cold-climate cultures are task-oriented. Communications need to furnish accurate and precise information. The society is logic-oriented, although individuals maybe otherwise. Efficiency and time are high priorities and taking them seriously shows respect for others. In hot-climate cultures, communications are indirect, as a show of respect. Questions are raised indirectly so as not to offend others. Usually, one needs to talk to a third party in order to get a direct answer, because it is considered impolite to provide some direct answers. For instance, one is considered boastful to say how skilled one is, how rich one is, how experience done is. A yes may mean yes, no, maybe or I don’t know, as it is impolite to disagree with whom one converses. One is rude if one embarrasses other people. On the other hand, in cold-climate cultures, communications are direct. One is respectful if one asks short, direct questions, as everyone else is busy and has no time to beat around the bush. A yes is a yes. People do not hesitate to say no and it is not offensive to say no. One offers a direct answer as factual information and it is proper to do so. One can nicely give both positive and negative critique and it is not taken personally. Hot-climate cultures are group-oriented. One person’s identity is tied to the group identity, such as the family, clan, village, or ethnicity. Usually, the leaders and elders take the initiative, not the younger members of the community. In regular and difficult times, the group supports the individual, as the individual is an integral part of the whole community. A person must behave properly, because one’s fault or mistake is considered the group’s fault and shame. Cold-climate cultures, on the other hand, are individualistic. Each person has an individual identity which must be respected. Everyone is expected to have an opinion, to take
  • Edited by Rey Ty 8 initiative, and to decide for oneself. One’s behavior reflects oneself and nobody else. In hot- climate cultures, everything belongs to everyone. For instance, food, things, and conversations belong to everyone. Keeping things private and not including others in our meals, activities or discussions are rude. In cold-climate cultures, privacy and private property are sacred. We are doing alright to arrange for private moments, private space, private conversations, and private appointments, which other people must respect. Not respecting one’s privacy is rude. Misunderstandings may arise due to different perceptions, including hospitality. Hot-climate people freely give hospitality 24/7 to anyone, anytime, anywhere, including doing business, meeting strangers, and exchanging gifts. Cold-climate people, however, also give hospitality, but are planned, announced, and of limited duration. When a cold-climate person invites someone to dinner, each person is expected to pay one’s own meal, except if the host announces ahead of time that s/he will pay. Hot-climate people are from high-context societies where everything matters. For instances, one’s personal background and personal connections are important. People ask you who your parents are, who your relatives are, with whom you work, and the like. One is expected to behave politely, dress properly, respect the rules, and follow protocols strictly. But cold-climate people are from low-context societies. It means just “be yourself,” as long as you act appropriately. What are important are not your personal or professional connections, but your personal knowledge and skills. One is casual and dresses informally in general. Critique of the Dangers of the False Dichotomy For beginners, the categorization of people into cold-climate and hot-climate people sounds good. However, there are many problems in this scheme of things. One, these binary caricatures are extremes. A novice who does not know the nuances in people’s cultures around the world— especially one who has not traveled abroad—could easily make arguments that border on stereotyping. Two, not all people in cold-climate countries have the same culture. The same argument goes for people in hot-climate countries. For instance, putting aside Islamic practices, a Muslim Egyptian, a Muslim Iranian, a Muslim Kazakh, a Muslim Hui from China, a Muslim Azeri, and a Muslim Indonesian do not have the same cultural practices. Three, are cultural differences really critically based on the temperatures of one’s country? I really doubt it. The more important variables are the type and level of economic development. People in post- industrial societies tend to care about the environment and the world in general. People in advanced capitalist countries tend to have individualistic cultures. People in backward and feudal economies tend to have more collectivistic cultures, due to poverty and the need for community and collective support and assistance. Four, people within a country can also have different cultures due to their economic and ideological differences. While rich people in general can have different cultures from the poor, a peasant, for example, can be collectivist, another peasant can be individualistic; a free-market business entrepreneur can be individualistic, yet another social- democratic businessperson can be collectivistic. The rich people of today in hot-climate countries prefer privacy to communitarian living: many of the children of rich families in the hot-climate countries have their own rooms furnished with all the latest technological amenities, each one with one’s own private bathroom, television set, sound system, computer, and electronic games. Thus, the temperature of one’s country of origin is not the key variable in explaining one’s culture. The list of criticism of Lanier’s framework can go on and on. The readers are warned to be critical of gross generalizations, name calling, and stereotyping. I challenge the readers to come up with their own framework on how to view similarities and differences among people of different cultures.
  • Edited by Rey Ty 9 Cultural Types People can react to another culture in one of three ways. Cultural ethno-centrists are those who reject anything foreign and insist that the only way to do things is how it is done in their home country. They will definitely have a bad time abroad. Cultural romantics are those who accept everything foreign to the extent of rejecting everything that comes from their country of origin. These persons will enjoy traveling and living abroad but will reject and criticize everything that comes from their country of birth. Both cultural ethno-centrists and cultural romantics are extremes and do not have a balanced view of different cultures. They praise one culture and criticize the other cultures. Lastly, cultural cosmopolitans are those who both love their own cultures as well as the cultures of others, including especially the culture of the country to which they travel. However, unlike the cultural ethno-centrists, cultural cosmopolitans find fault with their own culture but embrace their own culture with all its strengths and recognize its weaknesses as well. Unlike the cultural romantics, cultural cosmopolitans do not only enjoy foreign cultures but also recognize the demerits of foreign cultures. Thus, cultural cosmopolitans (1) neither hate or romanticize their own cultures nor (2) hate or romanticize the cultures of others. Taking into account the strong points and limitations of each culture, they are comfortable accepting their own culture as their foundation, but learn to adapt to the cultures of others. Reference: Lanier, A. A. (2000). Foreign to familiar: A guide to understanding hot and cold-climate cultures. Hagerstown, MD: McDougal Publishing.
  • Edited by Rey Ty 10 INTERCULTURAL ORIENTATION & INTRODUCING U.S. CULTURES Dr. Rey Ty, 郑文华 博士
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 23 MACHINING PROCESSES Dr. Matthew Gonser
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 37 ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING Dr. Matthew Gonser
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 51 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS Dr. Ji-Chul Ryu
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 55 HUMANOID ROBOTS Dr. Ji-Chul Ryu
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 59 WHAT KINDS OF ROBOTS IN SKY? Dr. Ji-Chul Ryu
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 63 CONTROL OF MULTIPLE ROBOTS Dr. Ji-Chul Ryu
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 66 MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS Dr. Abhijit Gupta
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 74 LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING Dr. F.M. Sciammarella
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 89 LEADERSHIP Dr. Rey Ty, 郑文华 博士 Reference: Northouse, P. G. (2013). Leadership: Theory and practice, 6th ed. London: Sage Publications, Inc. I. Introduction A. Definition 1. Ways of Conceptualizing Leadership 2. Definition and Components B. Description 1. Trait vs. Process 2. Assigned vs. Emergent 3. Leadership vs. Power 4. Leadership and Coercion 5. Leadership and Management II. Trait Approach: Intelligence, self-confidence, determination, integrity, sociability, five-factor personality model, emotional intelligence III. Skills Approach IV. Style Approach V. Situational Approach VI. Contingency Theory
  • Edited by Rey Ty 90 VII. Path-Goal Theory VIII. Leader-Member Exchange Theory IX. Transformational Leadership X. Servant Leadership XI. Authentic Leadership XII. Team Leadership XIII. Psychodynamic Approach XIV. Women and Leadership XV. Culture and Leadership XVI. Leadership Ethics LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP Dr. Rey Ty, 郑文华 博士
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  • Edited by Rey Ty 94 AN INTRODUCTION OF MICROMANUFACTURING: MICROFORMING Dr. Jenn-Terng Gau
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