Using Social Media in Student Affairs: An Evidence-Based Approach

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Talk given at #ACPA14 conference based on a chapter from the upcoming book Engaging Students through Social Media: Evidence Based Practices for Use in Student Affairs http://goo.gl/HGWW9j

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  • http://goo.gl/HGWW9j
  • They are tools with specific affordances - you don’t try to use a hammer to tighten a screw
  • Student affairs professionals don’t do this
    We often don’t think about social media as tools but as some disconnected reality
  • If you are thinking of implementing a social media intervention (program)
  • Informal learning refers to the types of learning that happen through processes and contexts that are not related to teaching, training, or research in educational institutions.
    Implicit learning is learning that happens without the person being aware that they are learning.
    They learn how to communicate with their peer group, how to discuss difficult issues, how to share successes without seeming like they are bragging
  • Ito et al. (2009) describe messing around as a multifaceted process by which youth experiment and learn about technologies; however, I extend this further to the social aspects of technology use to also relate to youth learning about how to be members of society. In other words, youth engage in messing around, a trial and error process that lets them learn what is culturally appropriate/acceptable and what isn’t within the context of their peer group. They “test the waters” with interactions by posting content and evaluating the reactions of their peers. Indeed, likes on Facebook are a “strong proxy for social status” and youth try to post photos that garner the maximum number of likes and go so far as to delete photos that don’t get enough likes
  • These are just examples - I’m not saying they engaged in connections to theory and research in a way that was appropriate.
  • They engage in social media listening by monitoring instances of student references to “financial aid” at “mizzou,” participating in conversations by responding to students who tweet about inferred needs (the office responded to a tweet containing “hate being broke” by inviting the student to visit the Office for Financial Success), answering direct questions that are sent to the office Twitter account or posted on the office Facebook page, and posting bulletins about upcoming deadlines. In these ways, they support student informal learning about financial aid procedures at The University of Missouri
  • These are just examples - I’m not saying they engaged in connections to theory and research in a way that was appropriate.
  • Using Social Media in Student Affairs: An Evidence-Based Approach

    1. 1. Engaging Students through Social Media Foreword by Mary Madden REYNOL JUNCO EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR USE IN STUDENT AFFAIRS http://goo.gl/HGWW9j Wednesday, April 2, 14
    2. 2. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    3. 3. Using Social Media in Student Affairs: An Evidence-Based Approach Wednesday, April 2, 14
    4. 4. #ebsm @reyjunco Wednesday, April 2, 14
    5. 5. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    6. 6. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    7. 7. Engaging Students through Social Media Foreword by Mary Madden REYNOL JUNCO EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR USE IN STUDENT AFFAIRS Wednesday, April 2, 14
    8. 8. Engaging Students through Social Media Foreword by Mary Madden REYNOL JUNCO EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR USE IN STUDENT AFFAIRS http://goo.gl/HGWW9j Wednesday, April 2, 14
    9. 9. Research Wednesday, April 2, 14
    10. 10. Consumer Wednesday, April 2, 14
    11. 11. Consumer Wednesday, April 2, 14
    12. 12. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    13. 13. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    14. 14. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    15. 15. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    16. 16. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    17. 17. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    18. 18. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    19. 19. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    20. 20. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    21. 21. Use Evidence Wednesday, April 2, 14
    22. 22. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    23. 23. Skeptics Wednesday, April 2, 14
    24. 24. Crusaders Skeptics Wednesday, April 2, 14
    25. 25. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    26. 26. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    27. 27. Self Esteem Wednesday, April 2, 14
    28. 28. Self Esteem Shyness Wednesday, April 2, 14
    29. 29. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Wednesday, April 2, 14
    30. 30. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Neuroticism Wednesday, April 2, 14
    31. 31. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Neuroticism Political Activity Wednesday, April 2, 14
    32. 32. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Neuroticism Political Activity Social & Academic Integration Wednesday, April 2, 14
    33. 33. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Neuroticism Political Activity Identity Development Social & Academic Integration Wednesday, April 2, 14
    34. 34. Self Esteem Shyness Extraversion Neuroticism Political Activity Identity Development Student Engagement Social & Academic Integration Wednesday, April 2, 14
    35. 35. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    36. 36. Identity Development Wednesday, April 2, 14
    37. 37. Identity Development ≠ Wednesday, April 2, 14
    38. 38. Identity Development ≠ Professional Self- Presentation Wednesday, April 2, 14
    39. 39. • Time spent on Facebook is positively correlated with time spent in campus activities (Junco, 2013; Heiberger and Harper, 2008; HERI, 2007) • Time spent on Facebook is negatively correlated with scores on a measure of student engagement; however, creating and/or RSVP’ing to events on Facebook was a much stronger positive predictor and chatting a much stronger negative predictor of engagement (Junco, 2013). • Students maintain a connection with high school friends on Facebook as they transition to college (Ellison, Steinfield & Lampe, 2007; 2011; Junco & Mastrodicasa, 2007) • Students’ natural uses of Facebook (social information seeking, reflecting on their experiences, exchanging academic information, etc.) promote social and academic integration (Selwyn, 2009) • Facebook use has direct impact on: self-esteem, satisfaction with university life, and students’ performance proficiency (Yu, Tian, Vogel, & Kwok, 2010) Wednesday, April 2, 14
    40. 40. • Interacting with students on Twitter as part of a first year seminar improved their engagement and their academic performance in all courses (Junco, Heiberger & Loken, 2011) • Students who used Twitter were more likely to persist: 88% of students in the Twitter group persisted into the second year, as compared with only 70% of students in the control group (Junco et al., 2011; Junco, Heiberger & Alonso- Garcia, in preparation). • Students who used social networking sites to learn about on-campus activities participated in face-to-face activities at higher levels and were retained at higher rates (Ward, 2012). Wednesday, April 2, 14
    41. 41. Social Media Interventions Wednesday, April 2, 14
    42. 42. Informal & Implicit Learning Wednesday, April 2, 14
    43. 43. Messing Around Wednesday, April 2, 14
    44. 44. Promoting Informal Learning Wednesday, April 2, 14
    45. 45. Questions Wednesday, April 2, 14
    46. 46. What are your desired learning outcomes? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    47. 47. How will you measure success? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    48. 48. What do results of research studies say about effective interventions for your learning outcomes? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    49. 49. Are social media appropriate to use to reach these learning outcomes? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    50. 50. Which social media sites have affordances that match your goals? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    51. 51. Social Media in Student Affairs Wednesday, April 2, 14
    52. 52. Facebook Twitter YouTube Blogs 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 25% 49% 63% 71% 81% 82% 96% Personal Use Professional Use NASPA Technology Knowledge Community Survey (2013) Wednesday, April 2, 14
    53. 53. Facebook Twitter YouTube Blogs 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 25% 49% 63% 71% 81% 82% 96% Personal Use Professional Use NASPA Technology Knowledge Community Survey (2013) Wednesday, April 2, 14
    54. 54. Facebook Twitter Blogs LinkedIn 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 88% 72% 92% 66% 84% 98% Admissions Career Services Barnes and Lescault (2011) and NACE (2013) Wednesday, April 2, 14
    55. 55. How? Wednesday, April 2, 14
    56. 56. Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    57. 57. 1.Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    58. 58. 1.Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students 2.Engaging in community building Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    59. 59. 1.Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students 2.Engaging in community building 3.Guiding student sentiment Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    60. 60. 1.Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students 2.Engaging in community building 3.Guiding student sentiment 4.Promoting networking skills Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    61. 61. 1.Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students 2.Engaging in community building 3.Guiding student sentiment 4.Promoting networking skills 5.Modeling appropriate online behavior Informal Learning Outcomes Wednesday, April 2, 14
    62. 62. Examples Wednesday, April 2, 14
    63. 63. Reaching and deepening relationships with individual students Wednesday, April 2, 14
    64. 64. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    65. 65. Monitor social media references to “financial aid” at “mizzou” Wednesday, April 2, 14
    66. 66. Monitor social media references to “financial aid” at “mizzou” Respond to students who tweet about inferred needs: “I hate being broke” Wednesday, April 2, 14
    67. 67. Monitor social media references to “financial aid” at “mizzou” Respond to students who tweet about inferred needs: “I hate being broke” Answering direct questions about financial aid Wednesday, April 2, 14
    68. 68. •Supporting informal learning about financial aid procedures •Increasing student-student affairs professional contact •Interacting with students on social media leads to increases in engagement and increases in staff/student offline interactions •Providing prompt feedback •Academic integration, persistence, academic success Connection to Theory and Research Wednesday, April 2, 14
    69. 69. Engaging in community building Wednesday, April 2, 14
    70. 70. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    71. 71. Facebook groups with RA staff, front desk clerk staff, and residents Wednesday, April 2, 14
    72. 72. Facebook groups with RA staff, front desk clerk staff, and residents Resident group used as a virtual lounge Wednesday, April 2, 14
    73. 73. Facebook groups with RA staff, front desk clerk staff, and residents Resident group used as a virtual lounge Bringing online conversations offline Wednesday, April 2, 14
    74. 74. •Improving cooperation among students •Learning the cultural norms of their environment •Academic and social integration •Improving student engagement •Helping reticent students have a voice •Persistence and academic success Connection to Theory and Research Wednesday, April 2, 14
    75. 75. Promoting networking skills Wednesday, April 2, 14
    76. 76. Wednesday, April 2, 14
    77. 77. Used Twitter during Career Services “Industry Road Trip” Wednesday, April 2, 14
    78. 78. Used Twitter during Career Services “Industry Road Trip” Learning objectives: communicate skills and learn networking techniques Wednesday, April 2, 14
    79. 79. Used Twitter during Career Services “Industry Road Trip” Learning objectives: communicate skills and learn networking techniques Taught students how to maintain professional online presence Wednesday, April 2, 14
    80. 80. Used Twitter during Career Services “Industry Road Trip” Learning objectives: communicate skills and learn networking techniques Taught students how to maintain professional online presence Collected basic assessment data Wednesday, April 2, 14
    81. 81. •Engaging in active and informal learning •Learning the norms of professional self-presentation/networking •Promoting self-reflection •Improving student engagement offline through online interactions •Helping reticent students have a voice •Persistence and academic success Connection to Theory and Research Wednesday, April 2, 14
    82. 82. Connection Wednesday, April 2, 14
    83. 83. AMA Wednesday, April 2, 14
    84. 84. AMA Wednesday, April 2, 14
    85. 85. Wednesday, April 2, 14

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