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Translating social media research into academically relevant practices. ...

Translating social media research into academically relevant practices.

Today’s college students use social media (i.e., Facebook, Myspace, Twitter), cell phones, blogs, and instant messaging at higher rates than people from other generations. In higher education, faculty members generally lag behind students in their use of technology. While some faculty members embrace it, most have negative views of newer technologies, believing that technology use hurts students academically and socially. Nevertheless, research demonstrates that students generally utilize newer technologies in ways that are beneficial to them. For instance, recent research has shown that students who use Facebook at high rates have more positive educational outcomes. Additionally, the use of blogs, cell phones, and instant messaging have all been shown to promote student academic and psychosocial development.
This presentation reviews recent research on how college students use technologies such as social media, cell phones, blogs, and instant messaging. Additionally, these slides highlight the latest research on student attitudes about social media, statistics on their use, differences in use based on gender, ethnicity, and social class (the digital divide), positive academic and social effects of technology use, and research-based strategies to help faculty members integrate technology into their courses in order to support student academic development.

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    Brunel eLearning 2.0 Keynote Slides Brunel eLearning 2.0 Keynote Slides Presentation Transcript

    • rey.junco@gmail.com www.reyjunco.com twitter.com/reyjunco Facebook : Rey Junco
    • PRESENTATION OUTLINE  College student technology use statistics  Adoption of newer technologies by faculty  The Digital Divide  Positive effects of technology use  Academically­relevant uses of technology
    • STUDENT TECHNOLOGY USE  Today’s College   Internet Students Use  Instant Messenger  Wikipedia  Blogs  P2P File Sharing  More than people   Facebook from other   Twitter generations Pew Internet and American Life Project (2009) & Junco and Mastrodicasa (2007)
    • Silent Generation Boom ers (1925-1942) (1943-1960) Personality Personality Loyal Optim istic Collaborative Com petitive Personal Sacrifice Individualistic Patriotic Reject Authority Conform ity Return to religious values Respect for authority Events Civic Pride VietnamW ar Events W atergate W I & II W W en’ Rights om s Great Depression Reagan recession NewDeal Civil Rights M ovement College Television 1943-1960 College 1961-1978 Ge ne ratio n X Ne t Ge ne ratio n (1961-1981) (1982-Now ) Personality Personality Independent Special Skeptical Sheltered Latchkey Kids Confident Shun Traditional Values Conventional Nihilism Team -Oriented Events Achieving Challenger Accident Pressured M TV Events Com puters Colum bine Shootings Video Gam es Septem 11 Attacks ber Persian Gulf W ar Oklahom City Bom a bing College College 1979-1999 2000-Now
    • SOCIAL NETWORKING WEBSITE  USE Pew Internet and American Life Project (2009)
    • TWITTER USE Pew Internet and American Life Project (2009)
    • FACULTY MEMBERS &  TECHNOLOGY USE  Typically from older generations  Not as likely to embrace newer technologies
    • NIELSEN MARCH 2009 REPORT  67% of global online community visit blogs and  social networking sites  Global active reach is greater than email  Facebook is visited monthly by 3 in every 10  people  Audience is becoming more diverse  In 2008, largest growth in 35­49 year olds  Increase of 156% from 2007 in use of cell phones to  access social networking in the US
    • FACEBOOK AUDIENCE BECOMING  OLDER SINCE 2007
    • THE DIGITAL DIVIDE Less Likely to  More Time  More Time  Own Mobile Talking SMS  Men   Women  Women  African American  African American  African American  Incomes <$10k  Latino/Hispanic   Incomes >$200k Junco, Merson, & Salter (Under review)
    • MULTITASKING Women, Latinos, and  first­year students  were more likely to  report that  multitasking had a  negative effect on  their academics. Junco & Cotten (In preparation)
    • FACEBOOK PENETRATION ON  COLLEGE CAMPUSES
    • GROWTH OF FACEBOOK, MYSPACE,  & TWITTER Unique Visitors Monthly Change Yearly Change Facebook 104,125,466 +14.36% +249.70% Myspace 55,559,317 -0.06% -8.61% Twitter 19,443,286 +38.56% +1,192.13%
    • BLOGS AND MICROBLOGS  28% of students reported maintaining a blog  44% reported reading blogs (Junco & Mastrodicasa,  2007)  Blog usage declined in early 2008, then has  increased steadily with the rising popularity of  Twitter  Blog use in the classroom (Nakerud & Scaletta,  2008)
    • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION
    • ENGAGEMENT ITEMS  Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions  Participated in a community­based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a  regular course  Used an electronic medium (listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.)  to discuss or complete an assignment  Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor  Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor  Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class  Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees,  orientation, student life activities, etc.)  Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students,  family members, co­workers, etc.)  Had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your  own  Had serious conversations with students who are very different from you in terms of  their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values  Attended an art exhibit, play, dance, music, theater, or other performance  Exercised or participated in physical fitness activities  Participated in activities to enhance your spirituality (worship, meditation, prayer,  etc.) National Survey of Student Engagement (2009)
    • RESEARCH ON FACEBOOK AND  STUDENT ENGAGEMENT  Few studies examining link  HERI (2007)  Heiberger (2008)  How is engagement related to technology use?
    • HERI (2007) & HEIBERGER (2008) HERI HEIBERGER N 31,500 via YFCY 375 Participants 114 Colleges and 1 Midsize Midwestern Universities U. Social Network All Social Networks Facebook only 94% use weekly 92% use daily No less time studying
    • ENGAGEMENT
    • RESEARCH­BASED STRATEGIES   Working with student  attitudes about online  privacy  Using social media to  enhance engagement  Facebook groups  Facebook applications  Using Social Media to  learn about faculty  Twitter
    • STUDENT ATTITUDES  Information posted on social networking sites is  private  “You shouldn’t be looking at my social networking  site unless, of course, I want you to”  “What is a privacy statement?”  The job search  Safety
    • CAREERBUILDER.COM SURVEY  (2008)  22% of Hiring Managers used Social Networking  websites to research candidates.  33% reported they found information to  disqualify potential employee:  41% posted information about them drinking or using  drugs  40% posted inappropriate photographs or information  29% had poor communication skills  28% badmouthed their previous company or fellow  employee  22% used discriminatory remarks  21% were linked to criminal behavior
    • FACEBOOK GROUPS
    • HELP STUDENTS CONNECT  TO GROUPS AND ACTIVITIES  ON CAMPUS
    • ENHANCE STUDENT  ENGAGEMENT IN LEARNING  COMMUNITIES
    • ENROLLMENT ORIENTATION  EFFORTS
    • LEARNING ABOUT FACULTY & STAFF
    • SOCIAL MEDIA  CONNECTIONS  Not for everyone  Build community  Learn about academic/faculty culture  Connect with professors   Maintain connection with students who graduate  Model appropriate social media behaviors
    • EFFECTS OF FACULTY SELF­ DISCLOSURE ON FACEBOOK  Three themes discovered by Mazer, Murphy, and  Simonds (2007):  Students like to learn about a professor’s  personality  Concern about faculty professionalism  Students concerned that faculty would “spy” on  them
    • FACEBOOK APPLICATIONS
    • COURSES 2.0
    • CAREERBUILDER.COM
    • CAUSES
    • STOCK MARKET CHALLENGE
    • TWITTER AND STUDENT  ENGAGEMENT
    • ENGAGING USES OF TWITTER
    • TWITTER IN THE CLASSROOM
    • QUESTIONS AND DISCUSSION