5 Mistakes in Storytelling: Part 1

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The purpose of this presentation is to list 5 typical mistakes people make when sharing stories in business settings.

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5 Mistakes in Storytelling: Part 1

  1. MISTAKES IN 5STORYTELLING PART 1
  2. WE KEEP HEARING ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF STORYTELLING
  3. Sadly, not too many business presenters know HOW OR WHEN TO TELL A STORY
  4. MISTAKE #1 Some presenters announce: “Let me start with a story”
  5. “Let me start with a story” triggers the wrong mindset for business audiences, who typically “don’t have time for stories”
  6. TO TELL A STORY WELL, YOU MUST TRANSITION TO IT WELL
  7. SAYING SOMETHING LIKE: “Here is how we can prevent the disaster that happened last year” GETS PEOPLE’S ATTENTION MORE THAN ANNOUNCING: “Let me tell you a story…”
  8. STARTING WITH THE CONCLUSION is an effective way to get attention in a business setting: “You don’t need a title to be a leader. Here is an example that illustrates this point. Three weeks ago…”
  9. MISTAKE #2 Some presenters think they are sharing stories, when in reality, they are sharing facts
  10. TAKE A LOOK AT THE NEXT SCREEN It has the makings of a story, but it’s just facts
  11. The average American has a 23-minute commute, which isn't all that bad. But for many Americans, that trip is much longer. Some of those long commutes are by choice. Some people choose to live far away from the office for better schools, a bigger house, or to be closer to family and friends. Others get stuck in a long commute when they lose their jobs and end up not being able to find anything closer.
  12. THIS IS NOT A STORY BECAUSE NOTHING HAPPENS The average American has a 23-minute commute, which isn't all that bad. But for many Americans, that trip is much longer. Some of those long commutes are by choice. Some people choose to live far away from the office for better schools, a bigger house, or to be closer to family and friends. Others get stuck in a long commute when they lose their jobs and end up not being able to find anything closer.
  13. A story must have a distinct time, place, character, and an event THAT HAPPENED FOR A PURPOSE
  14. MAKE YOUR AUDIENCE WONDER: “…THEN WHAT HAPPENED?”
  15. MISTAKE #3 Some presenters get the hero wrong
  16. ALL GOOD STORIES HAVE A HERO
  17. In most corporate presentations, you or your company is the hero AUDIENCES DO NOT CARE ABOUT THAT
  18. MAKE YOUR AUDIENCE THE HERO
  19. SHOW THEM HOW THEY BECOME THE HERO WHEN THEY ACT ON YOUR MESSAGE
  20. “Imagine yourself the leader in your industry” works better as a story intro than “Let me show you what our company does.”
  21. MISTAKE #4 Some presenters don’t relate stories to people’s experiences
  22. If someone tells you a story about flying into space, but does not relate it to your routines or thoughts, that story is quickly FORGOTTEN.
  23. STORIES BECOME MEMORABLE WHEN WE CAN RELATE THEM TO OUR EXPERIENCES
  24. In a recent episode of Mad Men, Peggy Olson pitched Burger Chef. She drew on the Apollo 11 landing and the family connection the event created at the time.
  25. Then she linked the idea of family connection created by the Moon landing to the connection people feel at the dinner table. STORIES WORK BEST WHEN WE LINK THEM TO PEOPLE’S EXPERIENCES.
  26. MISTAKE #5 Some presenters mention a story only once
  27. STORIES HAVE HIGHER RECALL THAN FACTS, but that still does not guarantee people will remember your particular stories.
  28. THESE DAYS, WE ARE DROWNING IN STORIES
  29. If a story makes an important point, ALLUDE TO IT MULTIPLE TIMES TO ENSURE RECALL.
  30. Find out other reasons people forget your content and what you can quickly do about it. USE BRAIN SCIENCE TO CONTROL WHAT PEOPLE REMEMBER Register for the webinar on September, 25th, 10am PST Click here to learn more about the Brain Science Webinar Join our webinar
  31. Link to Part 2 of Mistakes in Storytelling Register for the webinar on September, 25th, 10am PST Click here to learn more about the Brain Science Webinar

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