The Email Marketer's Guide to Gmail
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The Email Marketer's Guide to Gmail

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View the on-demand webinar today to learn how to stay in compliance with Gmail's bulk sender guidelines, how Gmail's tabbed inbox categories are really affecting your response rates, and what you can ...

View the on-demand webinar today to learn how to stay in compliance with Gmail's bulk sender guidelines, how Gmail's tabbed inbox categories are really affecting your response rates, and what you can do to help your Gmail deliverability.

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  • ANSWER: Reputation
  • ANSWER: Reputation
  • Social Features – How much of that mail is read?Content Features – What is similar in content or headers that can be correlated with subscriber engagement?Thread Features – How much interaction is there with the mail? Did the user start the thread?Label Features – Did the user categorize or label the message?Social Features – how much mail from that sender is read by the recipient?Content Features – what headers or recent terms are used that are correlated with the subscriber engaging with the email?Thread Features – how has the user interacted with the thread so far?Label Features – how is mail labeled?Gmail takes a slightly different approach. Rather than use engagement to determine what really belongs in the inbox, they look to see what subscribers prioritize and place that in another inbox, specifically, the Priority Inbox and now with the addition of “Tabs”. Priority Inbox sits on top of the main, general inbox, so users are more likely to read and engage with emails that land in priority inbox. Google studies claim that Priority Inbox users reduce the amount of time spent reading emails by 6% which equates to a full work week in a year. There are many hundred features falling into a few categories. Social features are based on the degree of interaction between sender and recipient, e.g. the percentage of a sender’s mail that is read by the recipient. Content features attempt to identify headers and recent terms that are highly correlated with the recipient acting (or not) on the mail, e.g. the presence of a recent term in the subject. Recent user terms are discovered as a pre-processing step prior to learning. Thread features note the user’s interaction with the thread so far, e.g. if a user began a thread. Label features examine the labels that the user applies to mail using filters. We calculate feature values during ranking and we temporarily store those values for later learning. Continuous features are automatically partitioned into binary features using a simple ID3 style algorithm on the histogram of the feature values.*Tabs*
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Inbox classification:Inbox categoriesSpam classification:Authentication & IdentificationSubscriptionUnsubscribing FormatDeliveryThird-Party SendersAffiliate Marketing ProgramsAnd if you’ve ever read the guidelines, you are probably thinking “yeah, but there’s nothing specific in those guidelines that are helpful. They’re generic!” True, but keep in mind Gmail can’t give away their secrets. And not to mention, we’ll help you navigate these mysteries and more!
  • Emails lacking SPF and DKIM will go through more filtering than those messages with filtering. Gmail can also trust messages with DMARC more as well.SPF definedDKIM defined – special requirements for Gmail, 1024-bit key http://blog.returnpath.com/blog/ken-takahashi/google-is-failing-your-perfectly-good-dkim-key-and-why-thats-a-good-thingDMARC explained: make sure to tie in partnerships with ISPs like Gmail and Return Path
  • SubscribeEach user on your distribution list should opt to receive messages from you in one of the following ways (opt-in):Through an email asking to subscribe to your list.By manually checking a box on a web form, or within a piece of software.We also recommend that you verify each email address before subscribing them to your list.The following methods of address collection are not considered 'opt-in' and are not recommended:Using an email address list purchased from a third-party.Setting a checkbox on a web form or within a piece of software to subscribe all users by default (requiring users to explicitly opt-out of mailings).UnsubscribeA user must be able to unsubscribe from your mailing list through one of the following means:A prominent link in the body of an email leading users to a page confirming his or her unsubscription (no input from the user, other than confirmation, should be required).By replying to your email with an unsubscribe request.Because Gmail can help users automatically unsubscribe from your email, we strongly recommend the following:Provide a 'List-Unsubscribe' header which points to an email address or a URL where the user can unsubscribe easily from future mailings. (Note: This is not a substitute method for unsubscribing.)To help ensure that your messages aren't flagged as spam, we also recommend that you:Automatically unsubscribe users whose addresses bounce multiple pieces of mail.Periodically send confirmation messages to users.Include each mailing list they are signed up for, and offer the opportunity to unsubscribe from those in which they are no longer interested.It's possible that your users forward mail from other accounts, so we recommend that you:Explicitly indicate the email address subscribed to your list.Support a URL method of unsubscribing from your mailing list (this is beneficial if your mailing list manager can't tell who is unsubscribing based on the 'Reply-to:' address).
  • SubscribeEach user on your distribution list should opt to receive messages from you in one of the following ways (opt-in):Through an email asking to subscribe to your list.By manually checking a box on a web form, or within a piece of software.We also recommend that you verify each email address before subscribing them to your list.The following methods of address collection are not considered 'opt-in' and are not recommended:Using an email address list purchased from a third-party.Setting a checkbox on a web form or within a piece of software to subscribe all users by default (requiring users to explicitly opt-out of mailings).UnsubscribeA user must be able to unsubscribe from your mailing list through one of the following means:A prominent link in the body of an email leading users to a page confirming his or her unsubscription (no input from the user, other than confirmation, should be required).By replying to your email with an unsubscribe request.Because Gmail can help users automatically unsubscribe from your email, we strongly recommend the following:Provide a 'List-Unsubscribe' header which points to an email address or a URL where the user can unsubscribe easily from future mailings. (Note: This is not a substitute method for unsubscribing.)To help ensure that your messages aren't flagged as spam, we also recommend that you:Automatically unsubscribe users whose addresses bounce multiple pieces of mail.Periodically send confirmation messages to users.Include each mailing list they are signed up for, and offer the opportunity to unsubscribe from those in which they are no longer interested.It's possible that your users forward mail from other accounts, so we recommend that you:Explicitly indicate the email address subscribed to your list.Support a URL method of unsubscribing from your mailing list (this is beneficial if your mailing list manager can't tell who is unsubscribing based on the 'Reply-to:' address).
  • SubscribeEach user on your distribution list should opt to receive messages from you in one of the following ways (opt-in):Through an email asking to subscribe to your list.By manually checking a box on a web form, or within a piece of software.We also recommend that you verify each email address before subscribing them to your list.The following methods of address collection are not considered 'opt-in' and are not recommended:Using an email address list purchased from a third-party.Setting a checkbox on a web form or within a piece of software to subscribe all users by default (requiring users to explicitly opt-out of mailings).UnsubscribeA user must be able to unsubscribe from your mailing list through one of the following means:A prominent link in the body of an email leading users to a page confirming his or her unsubscription (no input from the user, other than confirmation, should be required).By replying to your email with an unsubscribe request.Because Gmail can help users automatically unsubscribe from your email, we strongly recommend the following:Provide a 'List-Unsubscribe' header which points to an email address or a URL where the user can unsubscribe easily from future mailings. (Note: This is not a substitute method for unsubscribing.)To help ensure that your messages aren't flagged as spam, we also recommend that you:Automatically unsubscribe users whose addresses bounce multiple pieces of mail.Periodically send confirmation messages to users.Include each mailing list they are signed up for, and offer the opportunity to unsubscribe from those in which they are no longer interested.It's possible that your users forward mail from other accounts, so we recommend that you:Explicitly indicate the email address subscribed to your list.Support a URL method of unsubscribing from your mailing list (this is beneficial if your mailing list manager can't tell who is unsubscribing based on the 'Reply-to:' address).
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • Avoid URL shortenersCorrectly identify yourselfAll bulk messages you send must be formatted according to RFC 2822 SMTP standards and, if using HTML, w3.org standards.Messages should indicate that they are bulk mail, using the 'Precedence: bulk' header field.Attempts to hide the true sender of the message or the true landing page for any web links in the message may result in non-delivery.The subject of each message should be relevant to the body's content and not be misleading.
  • So now that we’ve outlined the key guidelines Gmail expects you to follow, you may be thinking – this is all interesting, but I need to do now to avoid the spam folder and reach the inbox!
  • When we talk about avoiding the spam folder and reaching the inbox – it’s all about engagement. So lets look at the key things Gmail considers important when it comes to engagement. WhileGmail can appear to be a mystery on the surface: they don’t share a lot of details on their postmaster page, don’t have a the typical feedback loop and aren’t forthcoming with information when you encounter delivery issues - however, the foundation of their filters is driven by ‘This is spam’ and ‘This is not spam’ votes.
  • According to Gmail it takes the average person 5 seconds or less to identify a message as spam. Since Gmail’s filtering technology is a learned system – this allows them to quickly learn what people like and don’t like and their filters can respond accordingly – putting mail in the inbox or junk folder depending on the subscriber’s actions. So what are you subscriber’s teaching Gmail about your email?You have a limited amount of time to make a positive impression on your subscribers so they don’t complain about your mail by hitting the spam button. A key metric Gmail looks at is whether or not your subscribers are voting your mail as “this is spam” or “this is not spam”.
  • So how do your subscribers vote?Lets say you have a message that is actually delivered to the inbox. Your subscribers may see that message and decide they really don’t want it and hit the spam button. What this is telling Gmail is that message was delivered to the inbox incorrectly and should be in the spam folder instead - so going forward that message would be filtered to the spam folder.
  • A key thing they monitor is complaints. If complaints are too high, future emails will be delivered mostly to spam. However, if more people click on “not spam” during this period, this indicates that the mail is safe to be delivered to the inbox.Spam and Not Spam a major indicator of wanted and unwanted emailMentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.
  • A key thing they monitor is complaints. If complaints are too high, future emails will be delivered mostly to spam. However, if more people click on “not spam” during this period, this indicates that the mail is safe to be delivered to the inbox.Spam and Not Spam a major indicator of wanted and unwanted emailMentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.
  • A key thing they monitor is complaints. If complaints are too high, future emails will be delivered mostly to spam. However, if more people click on “not spam” during this period, this indicates that the mail is safe to be delivered to the inbox.Spam and Not Spam a major indicator of wanted and unwanted emailMentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.
  • Conversely – if a message is delivered to the spam folder - you may have a subscriber that is looking for the message – they know they signed up, are expecting it – know they should receive it and are very engaged – so go looking for the message in the spam folder and mark the message as ‘Not spam”. This tells Gmail filtering system that this user really wants the message to go to the inbox. So the key here is ensuring you are sending to subscribers that WANT to receive your mail. You want to send to people that opted in to receive it and know they type of email they should receive from you and how often. These are the subscribers that are usually highly engaged with your email program because you’re sending relevant email to them that they want which results in their being so engaged they go searching for your emails in the spam folder. When they hit the “not spam” button – it sends a very positive message to Gmail that they filtered that email incorrectly and their system can adjust to begin sending it to the inbox instead.
  • A key thing they monitor is complaints. If complaints are too high, future emails will be delivered mostly to spam. However, if more people click on “not spam” during this period, this indicates that the mail is safe to be delivered to the inbox.Spam and Not Spam a major indicator of wanted and unwanted emailMentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.
  • A TINS report indicates that the message is of value to the recipient. It is notsurprising that the messages of senders with the best deliverability rates are rescuedfrom the spam folder and reported not to be spam more often than the messagesof senders with lower deliverability rates. While the TINS rate for the lowestdeliverability rates (less than 88%) and the middle deliverability rates (88-97%) arevery similar (0.17% and 0.15%) those with deliverability rates over 97.1% had TINSrates of at least 0.44%.
  • A TINS report indicates that the message is of value to the recipient. It is notsurprising that the messages of senders with the best deliverability rates are rescuedfrom the spam folder and reported not to be spam more often than the messagesof senders with lower deliverability rates. While the TINS rate for the lowestdeliverability rates (less than 88%) and the middle deliverability rates (88-97%) arevery similar (0.17% and 0.15%) those with deliverability rates over 97.1% had TINSrates of at least 0.44%.
  • A TINS report indicates that the message is of value to the recipient. It is notsurprising that the messages of senders with the best read rates are rescuedfrom the spam folder and reported not to be spam more often than the messagesof senders with lower read rates. As shown here – the highest read rates correlate to high TINS rates – indicating the subscribers wanted to receive the message versus having it filtered into their bulk folder.
  • So if your message does end up in the spam folder – the common thing marketers what to know is why?!
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.
  • Why:Why messages are marked as SpamGmail has an automated system that helps detect spam by identifying viruses and suspicious messages, finding patterns across messages, and learning from what Gmail users like you commonly mark as spam. If you click your Spam label and open one of the messages, you'll see a message at the top with a brief explanation about why that particular message was placed in Spam. Use this information to protect yourself from potentially dangerous or fraudulent messages and to better understand why a message was or wasn't marked as spam.Here are some of the explanations that you might see:Phishing ScamsMessages from and unconfirmed sender – why authentication is so important to Gmail!Message you sent to spam - you previously marked these messages as spam by clicking the "Report spam" or "Report phishing" button. Both actions will send the message to your Spam folder and remove it from your Inbox. Similiarity to suspicious messages:Gmail uses automated spam detection systems to analyze patterns and predict what types of messages are fraudulent or potentially harmful. Here are just a few of the things our system considers when marking a message as spam: Content that's usually associated with spam such as mature content and "get rich quick" schemesMessages that falsely appear to be a "bounced message" response (a system-generated email that you might automatically get after sending a message that can't be delivered such as a message sent to an invalid email address)Messages sent from accounts or IP addresses that have sent other spam messagesBehavior of other Gmail users, such as many people reporting spam from a particular senderSimilarity to other spam or phishing messages based on a combination of things like subject matter, elements like spelling and formatting, and suspicious attachmentsA difference between your Gmail language preference and the language used in the messageAdministrator-set policies - If your organization uses Gmail, the administrator within your group can decide what messages will not marked as spam. Message content is empty - An email with no content in the subject and body of the message might be classified as spam. Spammers may send blank messages accidently due to an error, or on purpose to collect a list of valid email addresses to spam in the future. You tried to unsubscribe from this sender - If a sender continues to send you email after you tried to unsubscribe from their messages, new messages from this sender will go directly to Spam.
  • Gmail is monitoring your TIS and TINS rates and if you exceed their acceptable complaint rate – you will likely end up in the spam folder. The current complaint rate targetl at Gmail is just .01% - so there isn’t much room for error. Complaint rate goal for Gmail = keep .01% or below – if exceed likely to start to see mail being filtered into the spam folder. So how do you ensure you keep your spam complaint rates down?
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.
  • So how do you reduce complaints so they don’t negatively impact your email program?Set the Right Expectations: Analyze whether or not you are meeting customer expectations for content and frequency versus what they were promised when they requested your email. If you find discrepancies, identify areas of opportunity to improve engagement.Ensure Your Customers Recognize You: Make sure that your recipients can easily identify you as the source and the sender of the email by having a well branded “from address” and subject line. Deliver Email You Promised and Keep It Relevant: Send customers the type and frequency of email you promised to deliver. Nothing different. Nothing more. Nothing less. Make It Easier To Unsubscribe Than Complain: Use a one-click process to allow customers to remove themselves from your list. It is far better to allow someone to unsubscribe than to have them negatively affect your reputation by complaining about you. Unsubscribes don’t negatively impact your sender reputation – complaints do.Understand WHY people are complaining - Objectively Analyze Your Program: While it may not seem like it, complaints can be kind of a gift to you. Use the reasons people are complaining to improve your program. Perform regularanalysis of your mailing program by looking for high rates associated with a data source, age and activity, response rates, customer segments, and content or campaigns.So now you might be thinking – well, that sounds great – buy how am I supposed to know what people are complaining about since gmail doesn’t provided a FBL?
  • Gmail offers a way for you to not only discover what messages your subscribers are complaining about – but help you ensure they can be removed from your list.While Gmail does not offer a feedback loop service in the traditional sense, they provide complaint feedback to you via what is called the list-unsubcsribe header – which we often refer to as the “poor man’s feedback loop”. For senders using the list-unsubscribe header, whenever an email is marked as spam, the subscriber will be asked if they want to mark the email as spam and/or also unsubscribe from future mailings. To prevent abuse of this feature, the unsubscribe feature will only work for senders with good reputations in the Gmail network.
  • The List-Unsubscribe header is an optional chunk of text that email publishers and marketers can include in the header portion of the messages they send. Recipients don't see the header itself, they see an Unsubscribe button they can click if they would like to automatically stop future messages.To enable this functionality, the following are required:• The email messages have a list-unsubscribe header which points to an email address or an URL that a subscriber can easilyunsubscribe• Sending domains publish an SPF authentication record, sign outgoing email with DKIM, and pass at least one authenticationprotocol• The sender has a good reputation within the Gmail system.Go to Gmail’s Bulk Sender Guidelines for more information, or verify your reputation at SenderScore.org, where inbox placement at Gmail and one’s Sender Score are highly coorelated.
  • To enable this functionality, the following are required:• The email messages have a list-unsubscribe header which points to an email address or an URL that a subscriber can easilyunsubscribe• Sending domains publish an SPF authentication record, sign outgoing email with DKIM, and pass at least one authenticationprotocol• The sender has a good reputation within the Gmail system.Go to Gmail’s Bulk Sender Guidelines for more information, or verify your reputation at SenderScore.org, where inbox placement at Gmail and one’s Sender Score are highly coorelated.
  • To enable this functionality, the following are required:• The email messages have a list-unsubscribe header which points to an email address or an URL that a subscriber can easilyunsubscribe• Sending domains publish an SPF authentication record, sign outgoing email with DKIM, and pass at least one authenticationprotocol• The sender has a good reputation within the Gmail system.Go to Gmail’s Bulk Sender Guidelines for more information, or verify your reputation at SenderScore.org, where inbox placement at Gmail and one’s Sender Score are highly coorelated.
  • In addition, if a sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header, their Gmail subscribers will be presented with another option to unsubscribe from the emails without registering a complaint.  This option is found by clicking on the downward-facing arrow underneath the from line of an open message, which then brings up the details box.  This feature is only available if the sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header mailto function.Gmail is on the move lately with another announcement and change to the UI. They announced at M3AAWG that they have just started to roll out a new feature which allows users to unsubscribe easily from promotional email. The new feature will be visible for most all promotional emails that contain a list unsubscribe header, those messages will display an "Unsubscribe" at the top of the email message.The change simply makes it easier to unsubscribe so users that want to unsubscribe are able without spending time searching for the small harder to find links that are usually buried at the bottom of a message. It's unknown at this time the overall impact to marketers but I expect that this in the long run will prove to be beneficial. According to Gmail their systems do have a harder time detecting 'soft' spam (bacn), messages that have been signed up for but the end user no longer wants. Sometimes they will report spam instead of searching for the unsubscribe link. The new feature will give greater visibility to the unsubscribe and hopefully users will chose that option instead of reporting spam.
  • In addition, if a sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header, their Gmail subscribers will be presented with another option to unsubscribe from the emails without registering a complaint.  This option is found by clicking on the downward-facing arrow underneath the from line of an open message, which then brings up the details box.  This feature is only available if the sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header mailto function.Gmail is on the move lately with another announcement and change to the UI. They announced at M3AAWG that they have just started to roll out a new feature which allows users to unsubscribe easily from promotional email. The new feature will be visible for most all promotional emails that contain a list unsubscribe header, those messages will display an "Unsubscribe" at the top of the email message.The change simply makes it easier to unsubscribe so users that want to unsubscribe are able without spending time searching for the small harder to find links that are usually buried at the bottom of a message. It's unknown at this time the overall impact to marketers but I expect that this in the long run will prove to be beneficial. According to Gmail their systems do have a harder time detecting 'soft' spam (bacn), messages that have been signed up for but the end user no longer wants. Sometimes they will report spam instead of searching for the unsubscribe link. The new feature will give greater visibility to the unsubscribe and hopefully users will chose that option instead of reporting spam.
  • In addition, if a sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header, their Gmail subscribers will be presented with another option to unsubscribe from the emails without registering a complaint.  This option is found by clicking on the downward-facing arrow underneath the from line of an open message, which then brings up the details box.  This feature is only available if the sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header mailto function.Gmail is on the move lately with another announcement and change to the UI. They announced at M3AAWG that they have just started to roll out a new feature which allows users to unsubscribe easily from promotional email. The new feature will be visible for most all promotional emails that contain a list unsubscribe header, those messages will display an "Unsubscribe" at the top of the email message.The change simply makes it easier to unsubscribe so users that want to unsubscribe are able without spending time searching for the small harder to find links that are usually buried at the bottom of a message. It's unknown at this time the overall impact to marketers but I expect that this in the long run will prove to be beneficial. According to Gmail their systems do have a harder time detecting 'soft' spam (bacn), messages that have been signed up for but the end user no longer wants. Sometimes they will report spam instead of searching for the unsubscribe link. The new feature will give greater visibility to the unsubscribe and hopefully users will chose that option instead of reporting spam.Per gmail link:Auto-unsubscribeWe don't think you should be burdened with managing messages you don't want to receive. We do our best to put messages in Spam when we're pretty sure you won't want or need them. But everyone has different preferences about the mail they want to see. You may not want to read any messages sent by a certain company or mailing list, while another Gmail user finds these same messages to be valuable.To help solve this problem, we're providing you with an unsubscribe tool for some messages. You'll see the unsubscribe tool when you mark a message from particular types of mailing lists as spam. If the particular message is a misuse of a mailing list you like to receive, you can Report spam as usual. But if you never want to receive another message or newsletter from that list again, click Unsubscribe instead. We'll send a request to the sender that your email address be removed from the list. It's that simple!Keep in mind that mailing lists may take up to three days to process your unsubscription request, so it may take a few days for you to stop receiving mail from the list. Also, please note that we are unable to provide the Unsubscribe option for all mailing lists. For your protection, Gmail won't display Unsubscribe for lists that are known to be owned by spammers. When you don't see the unsubscribe tool for a particular newsletter or mailing list that you trust, check the actual message for unsubscribe options, or try contacting the list owner about removal (you should only do this if the list owner is trustworthy and not a spammer).
  • In addition, if a sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header, their Gmail subscribers will be presented with another option to unsubscribe from the emails without registering a complaint.  This option is found by clicking on the downward-facing arrow underneath the from line of an open message, which then brings up the details box.  This feature is only available if the sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header mailto function.Gmail is on the move lately with another announcement and change to the UI. They announced at M3AAWG that they have just started to roll out a new feature which allows users to unsubscribe easily from promotional email. The new feature will be visible for most all promotional emails that contain a list unsubscribe header, those messages will display an "Unsubscribe" at the top of the email message.The change simply makes it easier to unsubscribe so users that want to unsubscribe are able without spending time searching for the small harder to find links that are usually buried at the bottom of a message. It's unknown at this time the overall impact to marketers but I expect that this in the long run will prove to be beneficial. According to Gmail their systems do have a harder time detecting 'soft' spam (bacn), messages that have been signed up for but the end user no longer wants. Sometimes they will report spam instead of searching for the unsubscribe link. The new feature will give greater visibility to the unsubscribe and hopefully users will chose that option instead of reporting spam.Per gmail link:Auto-unsubscribeWe don't think you should be burdened with managing messages you don't want to receive. We do our best to put messages in Spam when we're pretty sure you won't want or need them. But everyone has different preferences about the mail they want to see. You may not want to read any messages sent by a certain company or mailing list, while another Gmail user finds these same messages to be valuable.To help solve this problem, we're providing you with an unsubscribe tool for some messages. You'll see the unsubscribe tool when you mark a message from particular types of mailing lists as spam. If the particular message is a misuse of a mailing list you like to receive, you can Report spam as usual. But if you never want to receive another message or newsletter from that list again, click Unsubscribe instead. We'll send a request to the sender that your email address be removed from the list. It's that simple!Keep in mind that mailing lists may take up to three days to process your unsubscription request, so it may take a few days for you to stop receiving mail from the list. Also, please note that we are unable to provide the Unsubscribe option for all mailing lists. For your protection, Gmail won't display Unsubscribe for lists that are known to be owned by spammers. When you don't see the unsubscribe tool for a particular newsletter or mailing list that you trust, check the actual message for unsubscribe options, or try contacting the list owner about removal (you should only do this if the list owner is trustworthy and not a spammer).
  • In addition, if a sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header, their Gmail subscribers will be presented with another option to unsubscribe from the emails without registering a complaint.  This option is found by clicking on the downward-facing arrow underneath the from line of an open message, which then brings up the details box.  This feature is only available if the sender is using the List-Unsubscribe header mailto function.Gmail is on the move lately with another announcement and change to the UI. They announced at M3AAWG that they have just started to roll out a new feature which allows users to unsubscribe easily from promotional email. The new feature will be visible for most all promotional emails that contain a list unsubscribe header, those messages will display an "Unsubscribe" at the top of the email message.The change simply makes it easier to unsubscribe so users that want to unsubscribe are able without spending time searching for the small harder to find links that are usually buried at the bottom of a message. It's unknown at this time the overall impact to marketers but I expect that this in the long run will prove to be beneficial. According to Gmail their systems do have a harder time detecting 'soft' spam (bacn), messages that have been signed up for but the end user no longer wants. Sometimes they will report spam instead of searching for the unsubscribe link. The new feature will give greater visibility to the unsubscribe and hopefully users will chose that option instead of reporting spam.Per gmail link:Auto-unsubscribeWe don't think you should be burdened with managing messages you don't want to receive. We do our best to put messages in Spam when we're pretty sure you won't want or need them. But everyone has different preferences about the mail they want to see. You may not want to read any messages sent by a certain company or mailing list, while another Gmail user finds these same messages to be valuable.To help solve this problem, we're providing you with an unsubscribe tool for some messages. You'll see the unsubscribe tool when you mark a message from particular types of mailing lists as spam. If the particular message is a misuse of a mailing list you like to receive, you can Report spam as usual. But if you never want to receive another message or newsletter from that list again, click Unsubscribe instead. We'll send a request to the sender that your email address be removed from the list. It's that simple!Keep in mind that mailing lists may take up to three days to process your unsubscription request, so it may take a few days for you to stop receiving mail from the list. Also, please note that we are unable to provide the Unsubscribe option for all mailing lists. For your protection, Gmail won't display Unsubscribe for lists that are known to be owned by spammers. When you don't see the unsubscribe tool for a particular newsletter or mailing list that you trust, check the actual message for unsubscribe options, or try contacting the list owner about removal (you should only do this if the list owner is trustworthy and not a spammer).
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • While we encourage you include both List-Unsub formats, we have seen the functionality that results is different. Note – this is as we see it today, but Gmail could change it at any time!If you use the mailto: function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear giving them the option to either simply report the message as spam or both unsubscribe and report the message as spam.If you use the link function – when a subscriber selects the spam button, a pop-up box will appear that allows them to unsubscribe via the link provided. If the link is selected, a new pop-up window will appear allowing them to unsubscribe directly from the sender’s site. When the sender returns to their Gmail account, the pop-up box remains allowing them to continue with reporting the message as spam or cancel out. As a result, it APPEARS as if this option will alleviate a spam complaint on the message if the subscriber cancels out since they were allowed to easily unsubscribe via the link. Note – if you include BOTH options in your list-unsubscribe header, we have seen that the option is listed second (mailto or URL) drives the functionality that will appear to your subscribers.
  • Keep in mind Gmail doesn’t do anything without a reason – although ‘this is’ and ‘this is not’ spam votes are the foundation to their filtering – actions – what you’re starring in the inbox and your tabs are indications of how engaged you are with a particular email. They watch how many people have positive or negation actions and their filters then decide whether your mail belongs in inbox or bulk folder.
  • Gmail: Keep in mind Gmail doesn’t do anything without a reason – although ‘this is’ and ‘this is not’ spam votes are the foundation to their filtering – actions – what you’re starring in the inbox and your tabs are indications of how engaged you are with a particular email. They watch how many people have positive or negation actions and their filters then decide whether your mail belongs in inbox or bulk folder. One thing that is probably obvious to people is that Gmail tends to bulk a lot of marketing mail. The introduction of tabs is Gmail’s way to better manage marketing or promotional mail (aka – graymail – mail you signed up for, but don’t always engage with). So hopefully people are starting to see their promotional mail go to the promotions tab versus the bulk folder – as that’s the goal. Keep in mind the promotions tab is inbox delivery – it’s just not the primary inbox – but it’s not bulk delivery!Gmail has also reported they are seeing less complaints coming into their system due to the new tabs function – an indicator that the new tabs are making their subscribers happy – and as we discussed before – keeping the subscriber happy is very important to ISP. Trying to deliver better based on how people react to their email. ining whether or not email is wanted.
  • Gmail: Keep in mind Gmail doesn’t do anything without a reason – although ‘this is’ and ‘this is not’ spam votes are the foundation to their filtering – actions – what you’re starring in the inbox and your tabs are indications of how engaged you are with a particular email. They watch how many people have positive or negation actions and their filters then decide whether your mail belongs in inbox or bulk folder. One thing that is probably obvious to people is that Gmail tends to bulk a lot of marketing mail. The introduction of tabs is Gmail’s way to better manage marketing or promotional mail (aka – graymail – mail you signed up for, but don’t always engage with). So hopefully people are starting to see their promotional mail go to the promotions tab versus the bulk folder – as that’s the goal. Keep in mind the promotions tab is inbox delivery – it’s just not the primary inbox – but it’s not bulk delivery!Gmail has also reported they are seeing less complaints coming into their system due to the new tabs function – an indicator that the new tabs are making their subscribers happy – and as we discussed before – keeping the subscriber happy is very important to ISP. Trying to deliver better based on how people react to their email. ining whether or not email is wanted.
  • System adjusts quickly to new spam threats: Gmail also uses Google search to fine tune their spam filters. As new spam data is released, Google's computer network allows them to quickly modify Gmail's spam-fighting algorithms. It's often a matter of minutes between the time a spammer sends out a new type of junk mail and when it's blocked from Gmail accounts.For example: Let’s say a large company gets hacked and phishing messages are being sent containing malicious URLs to steal personal information. Soon people start posting that information on the internet – researching what is going on. Gmail will react – they look at what is common – what is being searched and apply that information to their filtering often blocking emails that contain the malicious URLs.
  • The following case study shows how a large retailer focused on mailing to their most engaged subscribers and achieved successful inbox placement at Gmail.
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • Highlight more URL blacklisting problems (mentioned SURBL, UIRBL).    Point out subject/from domain correlation problems.  Large spam complaints from subjects that don’t relate to from domain or overly generic (“great deals here”).  Watch for URL shorteners with spam problems (mentioned bitly).  IP/Domain sending history is important.  Don’t mail large volumes from domain/IP that hasn’t mailed before (note – age of domain is irrelevant). Much spam filtering is campaign based.  Look at spam votes by campaign.  Affiliate marketing is fraught with issues.  Advise against, but if you must, affiliate should use from domain of primary sender/marketer.  Promotional Mail should go to promotional folder.  Warn against campaigns that try to steer mail into inbox.  Unspecific here, but implied that mail in promotional folder treated better? They kept stressing RBLs so will want to perhaps expand the list of blacklists we’re flagging  Bad URLs in messages will drive mail to the spam folder…we recently validated this with some IP and IM data.     Mentioned that content standards were an important thing to consider as well but did not give up a ton of detail here except that MailChimp does a good job of this…will have to do some discovery here.    Mentioned that if senders continues to send mail to users that complain about a message, not only will the message go the users spam folder BUT it will negatively impact a senders overall reputation.    I asked how they associate senders with affiliate marketers…they said that was proprietary ( I just had to ask!).  While they didn’t give us details they did respond with some ‘telling’ information.   Google considers every spam vote a piece of ‘evidence’ against a possible spammer and they have full authority to do whatever they want to investigate.  My guess on this is that they’re clicking and exercising links on any message that is voted as spam.  Avoid Blacklists – triggered by complaints and spam traps
  • If you follow all guidelines and best practices outlined to ensure high subscriber engagement and you’re still ending up in the bulk folder, you can open a ticket with Gmail for further investigation. All tickets are reviewed, however, you won’t receive a direct response – but any issue raised that has an impact on Gmail’s overall filtering system will be addressed and appropriate action will be taken. You’re probably thinking – but I want to talk to someone and get a personal response! Gmail believes a strong collaboration between senders in a public forum goes a long way in solving delivery issues. The following is the link to the Gmail platform where senders can go and discuss issues with other senders.http://productforums.google.com/forum/#!categories/gmail
  • That’s a lot of guesswork to figure out where you may be failing when it comes to gmail inbox placement and without the right data, most marketers have to unnecessarily remove subscribers that could potentially buy in the future. Here at Return Path, we created a tool called Inbox Optimizer to help marketers and senders be compliant with Gmail’s Bulk Sender guidelines.We’ve already seen great results….
  • TrendRed line is 6 months prior to Gmail Optimizer being enabledBlue line is 6 months after Gmail Optimizer was enabled and clients were able to make corrective actions* Dark red line is the daily inbox placement before gmail optimizer was enabled and the light red line is the median inbox placement from May 11th up to July 11th.*Dark blue line is the daily inbox placement after gmail optimizer was enabled and the light blue line is the median inbox placement from that period through September 11th.*The enabled clients increased inbox placement rate overall in the after timeframe substantially.
  • We’ll email them the report.http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-5145506-pencil.php?st=fe3241dPencilStock photo File #: 5145506

The Email Marketer's Guide to Gmail Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 1
  • 2. Melinda Plemel Email Intelligence Group Return Path Melinda.Plemel@returnpath.com Tonya Mitchell Sr. Deliverability Consultant Return Path Tonya.Mitchell@returnpath.com
  • 3. A Brief History of Gmail
  • 4. April 1, 2004 1000 Users
  • 5. June 2005 Gmail buys gmail.com from Garfield
  • 6. 2006 Gmail has 7.1 million users
  • 7. February 14, 2007 Gmail opens signups worldwide
  • 8. 2008 Gmail has 29.6 million users
  • 9. 2009 Gmail is Out of Beta
  • 10. 2010 Priority Inbox is introduced
  • 11. 2012 Gmail has 425 million users
  • 12. April 1, 2014 Gmail Turns 10!
  • 13. New in Gmail
  • 14. The Tabbed Inbox
  • 15. Images on by default
  • 16. In App Actions
  • 17. Easy Unsubscribe
  • 18. What does Gmail say?
  • 19. Delivery Guidelines
  • 20. Delivery Guidelines • Authentication & Identification
  • 21. Delivery Guidelines • Authentication & Identification • Subscribe & Unsubscribe
  • 22. Delivery Guidelines • Authentication & Identification • Subscribe & Unsubscribe • Content
  • 23. Delivery Guidelines • Authentication & Identification • Subscribe & Unsubscribe • Content • Delivery
  • 24. Delivery Guidelines • Authentication & Identification • Subscribe & Unsubscribe • Content • Delivery • Third-Party Senders & Affiliate Marketing Programs
  • 25. Authentication SPF • Authenticates the IP DKIM • Authenticates the Domain • Gmail requires 1024-bit key DMARC • Technical specification to email authentication protocols
  • 26. Subscribe Unsubscribe
  • 27. Subscribe Unsubscribe
  • 28. Subscribe Unsubscribe
  • 29.  RFC 2822
  • 30.   RFC 2822 Correctly Identify yourself – Maintain Consistent From and Sending Domain
  • 31.    RFC 2822 Correctly Identify yourself – Maintain Consistent From and Sending Domain Relevant Subject – Not Pushy
  • 32.     RFC 2822 Correctly Identify yourself – Maintain Consistent From and Sending Domain Relevant Subject – Not Pushy Avoid URL Shorteners
  • 33.      RFC 2822 Correctly Identify yourself – Maintain Consistent From and Sending Domain Relevant Subject – Not Pushy Avoid URL Shorteners Don’t Hide
  • 34. Delivery
  • 35. Delivery • Inspire Subscribers to Personally Whitelist You
  • 36. Delivery • Inspire Subscribers to Personally Whitelist You • Occasionally Send Re-Confirmation Emails
  • 37. Delivery • Inspire Subscribers to Personally Whitelist You • Occasionally Send Re-Confirmation Emails • Not Spam Votes Matter
  • 38. Delivery • Inspire Subscribers to Personally Whitelist You • Occasionally Send Re-Confirmation Emails • Not Spam Votes Matter • Segment Mail Streams
  • 39. Delivery • Inspire Subscribers to Personally Whitelist You • Occasionally Send Re-Confirmation Emails • Not Spam Votes Matter • Segment Mail Streams • Warm-Up New IPs
  • 40. Third Party Senders & Affiliates
  • 41. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic
  • 42. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic • Monitor Every Campaign for Spam
  • 43. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic • Monitor Every Campaign for Spam • Ensure Affiliates Follow Best Practices
  • 44. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic • Monitor Every Campaign for Spam • Ensure Affiliates Follow Best Practices • Ensure Whois and Abuse information is up to date
  • 45. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic • Monitor Every Campaign for Spam • Ensure Affiliates Follow Best Practices • Ensure Whois and Abuse information is up to date • Assess User Interaction
  • 46. Third Party Senders & Affiliates • Watch Affiliate Traffic • Monitor Every Campaign for Spam • Ensure Affiliates Follow Best Practices • Ensure Whois and Abuse information is up to date • Assess User Interaction • Monitor your program to take down spammers
  • 47. So What Now?
  • 48. AVOID THE SPAM FOLDER… It’s all about Engagement!
  • 49. 5 SECONDS TO SPAM! 51
  • 50. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 51. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 52. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 53. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 54. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 55. Spam vs. Not Spam How Do Your Subscribers Vote? INBOX: SPAM FOLDER:
  • 56. TINS and Spam Filtering Source: 2013 Return Path TINS Report 58
  • 57. TINS and Spam Filtering Source: 2013 Return Path TINS Report 59
  • 58. TINS and Engagement Source: 2013 Return Path TINS Report 60
  • 59. TINS and Engagement Source: 2013 Return Path TINS Report 61
  • 60. WHY is Your Message Considered Spam?
  • 61. Why is Your Message Considered Spam?
  • 62. Why is Your Message Considered Spam?
  • 63. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam
  • 64. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams
  • 65. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams • Unconfirmed Sender
  • 66. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams • Unconfirmed Sender • Message Looks Suspicious
  • 67. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams • Unconfirmed Sender • Message Looks Suspicious • Administrator Policies
  • 68. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams • Unconfirmed Sender • Message Looks Suspicious • Administrator Policies • Message Content Empty
  • 69. Why is Your Message Considered Spam? • Previously Marked As Spam • Phishing Scams • Unconfirmed Sender • Message Looks Suspicious • Administrator Policies • Message Content Empty • Unsubscribe Request Failed
  • 70. Complaint Rate = .01%
  • 71. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? 73
  • 72. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? •Set Expectations 74
  • 73. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? •Set Expectations •Email Recognition 75
  • 74. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? •Set Expectations •Email Recognition •Be Relevant 76
  • 75. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? •Set Expectations •Email Recognition •Be Relevant •Respect Unsubscribe Requests 77
  • 76. How do You Reduce Spam Complaints? •Set Expectations •Email Recognition •Be Relevant •Respect Unsubscribe Requests •Understand WHY people complain 78
  • 77. List-Unsubscribe 1. List-Unsubscribe Header From: sender@domain.com Subject: Get 20% off – today only! Date: February 26, 2014 3:13:02 PM EDT To: subscriber@gmail.com List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:unsubscribesender@domain.com>, <http://www.senderdomain.com/email/unsubscribe/> 80
  • 78. List-Unsubscribe 1. List-Unsubscribe Header From: sender@domain.com Subject: Get 20% off – today only! Date: February 26, 2014 3:13:02 PM EDT To: subscriber@gmail.com List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:unsubscribesender@domain.com>, <http://www.senderdomain.com/email/unsubscribe/> 2. Authenticate with DKIM and SPF 81
  • 79. List-Unsubscribe 1. List-Unsubscribe Header From: sender@domain.com Subject: Get 20% off – today only! Date: February 26, 2014 3:13:02 PM EDT To: subscriber@gmail.com List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:unsubscribesender@domain.com>, <http://www.senderdomain.com/email/unsubscribe/> 2. Authenticate with DKIM and SPF 3. Have a Positive Gmail Reputation 82
  • 80. THEN… 83
  • 81. THEN… 84
  • 82. NOW… 85
  • 83. NOW… 86
  • 84. NOW… 87
  • 85. List-Unsubscribe Options MAILTO ADDRESS: UNSUBSCRIBE LINK: 88
  • 86. List-Unsubscribe Options – MAILTO ADDRESS 89
  • 87. List-Unsubscribe Options – MAILTO ADDRESS 90
  • 88. List-Unsubscribe Options – MAILTO ADDRESS 91
  • 89. List-Unsubscribe Options – UNSUBSCRIBE LINK 92
  • 90. List-Unsubscribe Options – UNSUBSCRIBE LINK 93
  • 91. List-Unsubscribe Options – UNSUBSCRIBE LINK 94
  • 92. List-Unsubscribe Options – UNSUBSCRIBE LINK 95
  • 93. Subscriber Actions In Account
  • 94. Starred or Important 97
  • 95. Starred or Important Actions Teach Filters 98
  • 96. System Adjusts Quickly to Spam Threats
  • 97. A Retailer’s Case Study: Engagement Strategy Only mailing to Gmail users 0-6 months old who put an item in their cart or clicked on an email Mailing only to Gmail users who had put an item in the cart or clicked on an email in last 30 days
  • 98. A Retailer’s Case Study: From 30 Days to 6 Months Expanded Engagement filtering rules and only mailing active Gmail users of 0-6 months who put an item in their cart or clicked on an email Reverted to only mailing Gmail users showing 30-days of activity
  • 99. What Else We’ve Learned…
  • 100. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy
  • 101. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy 2. Transactional mail is important
  • 102. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy 2. Transactional mail is important 3. SURBL and URIBL blacklists
  • 103. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy 2. Transactional mail is important 3. SURBL and URIBL blacklists 4. Overly generic subject lines = high complaints (Great Deals Here!)
  • 104. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy 2. Transactional mail is important 3. SURBL and URIBL blacklists 4. Overly generic subject lines = high complaints (Great Deals Here!) 5. Gmail’s spam filtering is dynamic and can vary with each campaign
  • 105. What Else We’ve Learned… 1. Gmail’s #1 priority is keeping their subscribers happy 2. Transactional mail is important 3. SURBL and URIBL blacklists 4. Overly generic subject lines = high complaints (Great Deals Here!) 5. Gmail’s spam filtering is dynamic and can vary with each campaign 6. Stop mailing to people who complain or risk reputation
  • 106. When All Else Fails… Open a Ticket with Gmail: https://support.google.com/mail/trouble shooter/2696779 Gmail Public Forum: http://productforums.google.com/forum/ #!categories/gmail
  • 107. 110
  • 108. Inbox Optimizer Corrective based on 50+ variables Important to email filters 111
  • 109. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 112
  • 110. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 113
  • 111. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 114
  • 112. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 115
  • 113. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 116
  • 114. Inbox Optimizer – Identify and Fix It! 117
  • 115. The Results…
  • 116. The Tab Impact for YOU
  • 117. Jot This Down • Find Out if Gmail Tabs is affecting you: http://gmailtabs.returnpath.com/ • The Email Marketer’s Guide to Gmail, Outlook, and Yahoo!: http://landing.returnpath.com/marketerfield-guide • Gmail Tabs Study: http://landing.returnpath.com/gmailtabbed-inbox 120
  • 118. Questions? Melinda Plemel Email Intelligence Group Return Path Melinda.Plemel@returnpath.com Tonya Mitchell Sr. Deliverability Consultant Return Path Tonya.Mitchell@returnpath.com