Summative assessment an example

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Project for CIADER session 3

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Summative assessment an example

  1. 1. CIADER: summative assessment: my experience and observationsG Out of the four major functions of summative assessment I chose to “check up” my TTC students’ performance by specially devising a task (the publication of a newsletter for teenagers on binge drinking) which would serve “the purpose of recording their performance at a particular time”, i.e. at the end of the 3-week project on “Teens’ healthy/unhealthy habits”. I conduct a “Creativity in FLL” workshop at a TT College in BA and I apply the CLIL methodology. It is a hands-on workshop which aims at providing English teacher trainees with the opportunity of developing creative skills (in the oral and written mode). By the end of the three weeks they were expected to submit a newsletter consisting of articles, interviews, surveys, etc. which would address one of the main concerns parents and schools have at present (teenagers’ binge drinking). What they had to develop: - Language skills: the students were expected to write clear, well-structured expositions of complex subjects, underlining the relevant salient issues. They were expected to expand and support their points of view at some length with subsidiary points, reasons and relevant examples. (C1 – CEFR) - Article writing skills: students were expected to: (Curriculum Council, 2005) o Demonstrate increasing sophistication, complexity, variety and control when conveying meaning with written texts. o Write a newspaper article that could give a detailed account of a topic o Select details to develop and experiment with creating a strong impression o Choose events and details that support the slant taken in the newsletter article. o Develop an introductory paragraph that would capture the attention of readers o Consider the reader’s knowledge of the subject and provide some details and background information o Recognize and use the conventions and features typical of the text format o Select vocabulary for precise meaning o Recognize meaningful divisions between sections of text and set these out as paragraphs o Express ideas clearly in well-structured sentences o Use most common punctuation marks and experiment with others o Ensure there is a flow in the sequence of ideas and events described by using paragraphs and transitional markers o Use suitable heading, sub-headings, text divisions o Select synonyms to enhance writing
  2. 2. - Newsletter design: the students were expected to: o Balance text with visual evidence o Use logo with name o Include three columns o Ensure font and size of text are easy to read o Use two or more graphics per page, appropriately placed with captions as needed What they were going to be tested on: their ability to write expository texts at C1 level respecting the guidelines for newsletter design and applying the Microsoft Publisher software. (See Apendix: analytic scale for assessing newsletter design, checklist for self- assessment of article writing, holistic (1-5) scale for self-assessment of written language use) During the 3-week project dealt with the different aspects of newsletter writing within a CLIL methodology (Coyle, 2007): - Content: students carried out research on binge drinking. Useful sites were visited, video clips were watched. Blog discussion took place initiated by the teacher and followed by students (http://cwsagradocorazon.blogspot.com/2010/06/healthy- living-part-1.html#links) . Oral presentations by students in which they shared what they have learnt about the topic and what they would like to include in the newsletter - Communication: students engaged in article writing awareness raising activities and in practice activities. (http://www.onestopenglish.com/section.asp?docid=147736). Class discussion and discussion of success criteria when assessing article writing: see checklist in Apendix. - Cognition: development of reasoning and critical thinking skills: class discussion following up video clips watching. (see blog for suggested video clips). Learning skills: self and peer assessment promote autonomous learning. Development of creative thinking (essential element in effective planning) - Culture/ Community: o Within the classroom  students work in groups: they feel that being members of a learning community is enriching (see Gisela’s comment in her reflective journal: Collaborative work at http://creativityworkshop- gisela.blogspot.com/)  students have the self-confidence and skills to work within a group, balancing personal interests and those of others
  3. 3. o Beyond the classroom  Students become acquainted with ways other cultures/countries, etc deal with the issues which concern teenagers, their parents and teachers. Before the end of each lesson we discussed how what we dealt with in class would enhance the newsletter they were in the process of writing. We discussed the assessment criteria as well (See Appendix) The publication was presented and advertised in the last lesson. Assessment rubrics and checklists were used for self-assessment purposes. Finally I provided feedback to the group as a whole (the design and publication of the newsletter) and to each student individually (applying the rubrics, scales and checklists in Appendix). Students were expected to reflect upon what they had learned and what they hadn’t learned yet. A final word: I would like to share that in the last three weeks of the term in the TTC where I conduct a language workshop, I have used one type of summative assessment: the design, writing and publication of a newsletter to look at what my students have learned. With the help of assessment rubric, scales, checklist, my students were able to self-assess their process and product, which allowed them to be confident in what they were doing. During the 3-week project we had the opportunity of constructing very useful knowledge in different areas: content, communication, cognition and culture. We also had the chance of going over the success criteria and even co-designing one of the grading scales (newsletter design rubric). Both the possibility of constructing knowledge in class and with the help of our blog (discussion blog and reflective journal blog) and of discussing the success criteria resulted in making students fully responsible of their learning to the extent that when the time came for marking their performance there was absolutely no doubt. To take a look at the newsletter designed by Gisella, Verónica and Gabriela, go to Into Teen’s World
  4. 4. References  Council of Europe (2001) Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching and assessment. Cambridge: CUP.  Coyle D. (2007) Content and Language Integrated Learning: Towards a connected research agenda for CLIL pedagogies. In Coyle D. & Baetens Beardsmore H. (eds.) Research on Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Vol. 10, Nº 5, pp. 543 – 562.  Curriculum Council (2005) Outcomes and Standards Framework – English, Department of Education and Training, Western Australia.  Fisher R. (1995) Teaching Children to Think. Cheltenham: STP.
  5. 5. Newsletter assessment Choose the corresponding descriptor for each of the eight criteria 1 2 3 LAYOUT Newsletter lacks Attempts to balance Layout of graphics balance between text use of graphics with and text is balanced and images text with visual evidence of more planning and organization BANNER No logo. Name of Title of newsletter in Use of logo with name newsletter not largest print on page; of newsletter in largest distinguishes from the no logo size text on page rest of the text in size FORMATTING One column Two columns Three columns: more planning and organization evident FONT & SIZE Font is too fancy and Font and size of text Font and size of text too small to read are simple and easy to are easy to read and comfortably read encourages the viewer to read on GRAPHICS Uses text only, no Uses one graphic per Uses two or more graphics or graphics page with caption as graphics per page, overdone, no captions appropriate appropriately placed, for photos with captions as needed. TASK Newsletter is missing Newsletter has one Newsletter has COMPLETION more than one article article not meet the minimum requirement requirements requirements for all articles SCIENTIFIC More than one article One article does not Lead articles contain BACKGROUND does not meet the accurately explain the sufficient explanation requirements for scientific background of the scientific scientific background background FACT ACCURACY More than one article One article contains Facts in articles used contains inaccurate inaccurate facts in its to explain background facts in its explanation explanation or issues are accurately reported
  6. 6. Article writing assessment Answer Yes/No. Account for your answer referring to your articles  Does your article give a detailed account of a certain topic? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you selected details to develop and experiment with creating a strong impression? Yes/ No …………………………………………………………………….  Have you chose events and details that support the slant taken in the newsletter? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Does the introductory paragraph capture the attention of readers? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you considered the reader’s knowledge of the subject and provided some details and background information? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Do you recognize and use the conventions and features typical of the newsletter text form? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you selected vocabulary for precise meaning? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you recognized meaningful divisions between sections of text and have you set these out as paragraphs? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you expressed ideas clearly in well-structured sentences? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you used most of the common punctuation marks and experimented with others (e.g. dashes, colons, etc.)? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you ensured there is a flow in the sequence of ideas and events described by using paragraphs and transitional markers? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you used suitable headings, sub-headings, text divisions, etc.? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..  Have you selected synonyms to enhance writing? Yes/ No ……………………………………………………………………..
  7. 7. Qualitative aspects of written language use Mark with a cross the level you consider most suitable (1 – poor; 5 – outstanding) - I can write clear, well-structured texts of complex subjects, underlining the relevant salient issues, expanding and supporting points of view at some length with subsidiary points, reasons and relevant examples and rounding off with an appropriate conclusion. 1 2 3 4 5 - I can write clear, well-structured expositions of complex subjects, underlining the relevant salient issues 1 2 3 4 5 - I can expand and support points of view at some length with subsidiary points, reasons and relevant examples. 1 2 3 4 5 Project: Healthy teenagers Duration: 3 weeks Final tasks: 1. Newsletter for teenagers about the effects and risks of binge drinking 2. Radio programme for teenagers about eating disorders 3. Facebook posting for teenagers about …. Sex. The assessment consisted in their producing the newsletter (article writing and newsletter format), the radio programme (oral skills) and posting on the web. Summative decisions relate to passing or failing students on the basis of their progress or achievement, or certifying them based on their level of ability. Summative decisions are made after the processes of teaching and learning.

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