40-Story Wood Office Building of the Future

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This presentation from the 2013 AIA Convention reviews how engineered wood systems are evolving to allow for higher structures using wood. It explores the hybrid systems that allow the construction of high-rise buildings with wood as the primary construction material. Finally, it highlights how a 40-story wood structure can deliver superior energy efficiency relative to similarly scaled buildings.

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40-Story Wood Office Building of the Future

  1. 1. EE150Friday, June 21, 2013.25 LU40-Storey Wood Office Building of the Future
  2. 2. This presentation is protected by U.S.and international copyright laws.Reproduction, distribution, display anduse of the presentation without writtenpermission of the speaker is prohibited.
  3. 3. This program is registered with AIA CES for continuingprofessional education. As such, it does not includecontent that may be deemed or construed to constituteapproval, sponsorship or endorsement by the AIA of anymethod, product, service, enterprise or organization. Thestatements expressed by speakers, panelists, and otherparticipants reflect their own views and do notnecessarily reflect the views or positions of The AIA or ofAIA components, or those of their respective officers,directors, members, employees, or other organizations,groups or individuals associated with them. Questionsrelated to specific products, publications, and servicesmay be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
  4. 4. Learning Objectives1. Review the benefits of maximizing the use of wood in tallerbuildings.2. Review engineered wood systems and materials, that allow tallerwood buildings to be constructed.3. Review the design issues, including the sustainable benefits ofconstructing taller wood buildings.4. Review how one option provides a viable solution to the design oftaller wood buildings.
  5. 5. Acknowledgements/Credits40 Storey Wood Office Building of the Future, Design TeamArchitecture: CEI ArchitectureStructural Engineering RJC Consulting EngineersMechanical Engineering Rocky Point EngineeringCivil Engineering 20/20 EngineeringValue Analysis SSA/QS
  6. 6. Course DescriptionIntroductionThe growing exploration of new engineered andhybrid technologies is driving the wood trend tosoaring new heights, with industry visionariesexpecting to see high-rise wood structureswithin our lifetime.Nowhere is that vision more clear than in a 40-story design recently recognized as anhonorable mention recipient in the “OfficeBuilding of the Future” Design Competition,held by the Commercial Real EstateDevelopment Association (NAOIP).
  7. 7. RegionBritish Columbia, Canada is located in the Pacific Northwest.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  8. 8. The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future CompetitionVancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  9. 9. Our Goals:1. To define an Innovative solution, to the issues of an office building ofthe future, addressing issues such as flexibility, daylighting,attractiveness and energy efficiency.2. To ensure that our solution also includes innovative sustainablestrategies that minimizes the “Embodied Carbon Footprint” as well asthe “Operational Carbon Emissions”.3. To define a solution that is uniquely Iconic and instantly branding.4. To develop a conceptual structural system for tall buildings thatutilizes mass timber.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  10. 10. 1. Wood stores carbon dioxide.2. Wood is a renewable resource.3. Wood appeals to people’s senses.4. Wood can meet the structuralrequirements for long spans.5. Wood is easy to work with.6. Wood buildings are lighter and moreflexible.1. Wood is economical.2. Advances in Wood technology isproviding solutions for tall wood buildingstructures.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future CompetitionWHYWOOD?
  11. 11. • British Columbia: 15% of BC GDP comes from the production of woodproducts.• With modern timber management practices more timber is grown than isused, therefore sufficient material resources are available.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  12. 12. Through the process of Photosynthesis, plant materials(wood) convertCarbon Dioxide into Oxygen.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  13. 13. Wood appeals to people’s senses. It is aesthetically pleasing.VanDusen Botanical Gardens Visitor Centre, Vancouver, B.C., Perkins and Will ArchitectsOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  14. 14. Wood appeals to people’s senses. It is aesthetically pleasing.UBC Earth Sciences Building, Perkins and Will ArchitectsOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  15. 15. Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future CompetitionWood Innovation Centre, Michael Green Architecture
  16. 16. Earthquake Safety: Wood is lighter and more flexible1. Redundant load paths forseismic forces.2. High stress to weight ratio.3. The ability to flex therebyabsorbing and dissipatingseismic forces.1. Wood structural panels,such as plywood, acting incombination with studs andjoists, create shear walls anddiaphragms.The failure of buildings and numerous deaths from recent earthquakesis fueling demand for safer housing.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future CompetitionEarthquake Analysis, Shake Table
  17. 17. PERFORMANCE DURING A FIRE• Fire safety strategies include:1. compartmentalization2. Fire/smoke detectors3. Sprinkler systems4. Smoke and heat extractionsystems5. Protected/secure escape routes6. Minimal penetrations throughtimber walls.• In 1994-1998 only 7% of reportedstructure fires had any type ofautomatic extinguishing equipmentpresent. By 2003-2007 thispercentage has risen to 10%.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  18. 18. PERFORMANCE DURING A FIRE• Regarding public safety, timber isrelatively harmless when youconsider the impact of smokedensity and toxicity produced duringa fire.• Timber performs favorably incomparison to other buildingmaterials.• During a fire, the surface turns tocharcoal (charring), reducing therate it burns by 50%. Exposed steelconnections are usually the weakestlink. Hidden connections, protectedby wood, perform better.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  19. 19. SPRINKLERS• When sprinklers are activated and operate they are effective97% of the time. For home fires, death is reduced by 83% andproperty damage is reduced by 40-70%National Fire Protection AssociationOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  20. 20. Canadian Wood Council, The Case for Tall Wood Buildings:MGB Architecture + Design (Michael Green), Equilibrium Consulting, LMDGLtd, BTY GroupOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  21. 21. To achieve continuity and ductility, wood works best whencombined with steel.To achieve strength and acoustic qualities, wood worksbest when combined with concrete.In essence this is a “Reinforced Wood” structureC.C. Yao, RJC Engineering, Vancouver, B.C.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  22. 22. Cross Laminate Timber PanelsGlue Laminated Beams incorporating steel connectionsPresent-day wood technology allows for the construction of tall woodstructures.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  23. 23. 1. Flexibility: column-free space.2. Connection with the naturalenvironment.3. Maximum Daylighting.4. Sustainable design strategies.5. Potential for interconnectedfloors.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future CompetitionTYPICAL FLOOR PLAN
  24. 24. Cross-laminated timber floor panels span 30 feet from central core toperimeter glue-laminated truss.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  25. 25. Floor to ceilingtrusses support floorstructure.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  26. 26. End trusses aresupported bylongitudinal trusses,that cantilever 30feet, from theconcrete pillar.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  27. 27. End trusses are supportedby longitudinal trusses,that cantilever 30 feet,from concrete pillarOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  28. 28. Sky Garden, located at every ten-storey interval.1. Provides access to exterior2. Mechanical space, serving tenstories at a time, allows forsmaller systemsOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOPOffice Building of the FutureCompetition
  29. 29. Our submission attempts to address the issues of creatingeffective and attractive working environments that areappealing to a broad cross section of the working public.We believe that a tall 40-storey office building from wood,provides opportunities to be uniquely Iconic, instantlybranding, flexible, aesthetically pleasing and attractive topotential tenants.Our Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of theFuture Competition
  30. 30. Wood is economical.A 5% savings was realized when wood wascompared to a traditional concrete andsteel tower.NAIOP COMPETITIONCOMMERCIAL OFFICE TOWER,VANCOUVER, BCCOMPARATIVESUMMARY(Innovative Hybrid v. Traditional)CONCEPTUAL ESTIMATEORDER OF MAGNITUDE COSTSSA QUANTITY SURVEYORS LTD.NAIOP - 40 Storey Tower$/SF $Parkade 149,325 SF $91 $13,595,305Electrical 149,325 SF $3 $485,547Mechanical 149,325 SF $4 $624,274Podium - Incl. Finish 38,500 SF $111 $4,292,125Electrical 38,500 SF $31 $1,180,334Mechanical 38,500 SF $51 $1,967,224Tower Shell, Core and Finish 546,340 SF $135 $73,597,143Tower Electrical 546,340 SF $29 $15,734,562Tower Mechanical 546,340 SF $46 $24,870,759Site Development $3,052,007TOTAL HARD CONSTRUCTION COST 734,165 SF $190 $139,399,278Management Fee $4,181,978Contingency 10% $21,537,188TOTAL HARD CONSTRUCTION COST INCL. CONTINGENCY $165,118,445Soft CostDesign and Consultantin Fees $19,814,213Project Management $1,651,184Permits and Fees $825,592General $1,000,000TOTAL ESTIMATED CONSTRUCTION COST 734,165 SF $257 $188,409,435Traditional - 40 Storey Tower (Matching Plan - LEED Certified)$/SF $Parkade 149,325 SF $91 $13,595,305Electrical 149,325 SF $3 $485,547Mechanical 149,325 SF $4 $624,274Podium - Incl. Finish 38,500 SF $111 $4,292,125Electrical 38,500 SF $31 $1,180,334Mechanical 38,500 SF $51 $1,967,224Tower Shell, Core and Finish 546,340 SF $145 $79,129,617Tower Electrical 546,340 SF $31 $16,749,695Tower Mechanical 546,340 SF $51 $27,916,158Site Development $3,052,007TOTAL HARD CONSTRUCTION COST 734,165 SF $203 $148,992,285Management Fee $4,469,769Contingency 10% $23,019,308TOTAL HARD CONSTRUCTION COST INCL. CONTINGENCY $176,481,361Soft CostDesign and Consultanting Fees $17,648,136Project Management $1,764,814Permits and Fees $882,407General $1,000,000TOTAL ESTIMATED CONSTRUCTION COST 734,165 SF $269 $197,776,718Note 1: Excludes Marketing Fees, Owners Contingency and LandNote 2: Estimate based upon 2012 (Q2) Unit Rates and Conceptual Design AssumptionsSFSFOur Solution—The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition
  31. 31. Conclusions:1. Wood towers can be constructed usingpresent-day technology.2. Wood towers sequester substantial amountsof carbon dioxide.3. Wood towers are aesthetically pleasing andpotentially iconic.4. Wood towers are lighter and perform betterin seismically sensitive areas.5. Wood towers are more economical thantraditional concrete and steel towers.Our Solution-The 2012 NAIOP Office Building of the Future Competition

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